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'Feel well' or 'feel good'?
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(Reposted from old newsgroup on 2/13/03)

Everybody wants to "feel well." Everybody also likes to "feel good." What's the difference?

From Rachel rsk1@earthlink.net

[This message was edited by Admin on February 13, 2003 at 08:16 AM.]
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(Reposted from old newsgroup on 2/13/03)

"Feel well," I think, is used only to refer to a good health condition. "Feel good," on the other hand, can also be used in this way, but is also very commonly used to refer to a good emotional condition.

David Shaffer disin@mail.chosun.ac.kr

[This message was edited by Admin on February 13, 2003 at 08:17 AM.]
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(Reposted from old newsgroup on 2/13/03)

This is an interesting topic.

So can we say as follows...?

(Someone sick long in the hospital says to the person visiting him/her.)

"I can't feel well but I feel good this morning."

Thanks for your comments.

Bocchi (Hirosima,Japan)

[This message was edited by Admin on February 13, 2003 at 08:17 AM.]
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(Reposted from old newsgroup on 2/13/03)

Both answers are correct.

"Feel well" and "be well" refer to one's health. "Well" in this case in an adjective. This is the only use of "well" as an adjective - to mean healthy, not sick.

"Feel good" means to "feel happy."

So in Bocchi's answer above -- "I can't feel well but I feel good this morning" -- the sick speaker in the hospital is saying that he can't feel healthy, but he does feel happy, or in a good state of mind.

Compare "feel good" with "feel bad," as discussed in "feel bad vs. feel badly" on the Grammar Exchange. "Feel good" means to "feel happy"; "feel bad" means to "feel unhappy."

("Feel badly," as well as "feel bad," meaning to feel unhappy, guilty, or uneasy, does exist, as described in Quirk, page 408-409. It has become acceptable according to The American Heritage Dictionary, as seen in the usage entry under "bad." Still, Quirk notes that "...there are prescriptive objections to the adverb form ...badly with feel.)

Rachel rsk1@earthlink.net

[This message was edited by Admin on February 13, 2003 at 08:17 AM.]
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niether well nor good are correct. feel better is the correct one
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Sorry, Yaseen. It's not true that neither "well" nor "good" is correct. They are both correct, as described above.

"Feel better" is also correct, but it has a different meaning. It means that one has improved from a previous time.

You describe your state or condition as feeling well or feeling good without making a comparison.
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