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"Change of" or "change in" plans?
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Hello,

Which is correct please ?

1) There has been a change IN plans.

2) There has been a change OF plans.

Thank you.

Ricky

<Grammar Exchange 2>
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Both forms are correct. In a perfect grammar world the rules would go like this:

1) The phrase "change of plans" signals that the plans as a whole have been changed. The first plan is abandoned and a new plan substituted, e.g.

There's been a change of plans for the program, and now the entire schedule has had to be revised

2) The phrase "change in plans" signals that the plans as a whole are still there, but that a part of the plans has been changed, e.g.

There has been a slight change in plans: we're meeting at five-thirty for dinner instead of six before we go to the opera

In actuality, we find both expressions used for both situations. If we use the word "complete" modifying the word "plans," however, the much more common expression is with of:

There has been a complete change of plans; we're rescheduling the party for after the holidays, and this time we're inviting the children

Marilyn Martin
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