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use and meaning of "one of"
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The Managing Director of Dhaka Wasa has said that this is a common scenario during the dry season since deep tube wells malfunction during the time. If this trend is known, then the question is, why adequate preparation was not taken ahead of time to deal with it? The MD has himself stated that there has been no reduction in water production. So the problem must be one of logistics rather than one of supply. We understand that Wasa itself has infrastructural constraints. But, given the seriousness of this not so uncommon crisis, and the fact that it is the socially vulnerable that suffer the most, we demand Wasa deals with it with the importance such an issue deserves. Better management of logistics could ease the suffering, if not fully eradicate it.


All this sentences have been taken from Water crisis in the city.


It is a link of a news. I would like to draw attention on a sentence. The sentence is So the problem must be one of logistics rather than one of supply.

What may happen if I omit one of and write this sentence in the following way?

So the problem must be logistics rather than supply.

Actually I can understand the use of one of in this case. I would be happy if anyone would explain it.

Thanks in advance!

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Nousher Ahmed,
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Location: Argentina
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Hello, Nousher.

quote:
All this sentences have been taken from Water crisis in the city.


"this" is singular. You should have said:

- All these sentences have been taken...

OR

- All this paragraph has been taken...

That said, let me tell you the paragraph contains at least one mistake -- the use of a interrogation mark (?) after a question which, being in affirmative order, looks like an indirect or reported question:

- [...] the question is why adequate preparation was not taken ahead of time to deal with it. (reported or indirect question)

- [...] the question is, why was adequate preparation not taken ahead of time to deal with it? (uncontracted direct question)

- [...] the question is, why wasn't adequate preparation taken ahead of time to deal with it? (contracted direct question)

Now, in answer to your specific question, that sentence in particular is fine as it is. The author of the article wanted to use an adjective to qualify the problem, that is, to describe the kind of problem. We do have an adjective for "logistics" (logistic, logistical), but there is no adjective for the noun "supply," so the writer decided to use the structure "one of (noun)" to mean "a problem related to (logistics/supply)."

If you omit "one of," the sentence may be acceptable but imprecise: the problem is not the area of logistics/supply as a whole but refers to the area of logistics/supply. This description can be achieved by means of an adjectival structure. Since, as I said, there is no adjective for both nouns, a prepositional phrase (of logistics/of supply) is used.

This message has been edited. Last edited by: Gustavo, Contributor,
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In a number of ways man brings diversity in his language. Your nice explanation reminds me this fact and teaches a great lesson. You and your way of explanation, both are great!
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