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Written form of name
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This question was submitted by Dmitri, a new member.

Is it acceptable to use yNa Symmone as a name instead of Yna Symonne?
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Location: Saudi Arabia
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Well, I think that depends on what language is being talked about. If it was English, I don't think it is acceptable unless the name is seen on advertisement or shirt or suchlike to attract attention or so.

This maybe acceptable in languages, if there is any, where there systems allow for such.

I also would like to know of the "Y" is pronounced in that name. In case not pronounced, that may allow for writing it in lower case.

That's was my two centsSmile

I hope I was able to hit the nail on the head.


SmileIzzy loves you allSmile
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Izzy, that's it! You have hit the nail on the head exactly!

The spelling -- yNa -- would not normally be acceptable. The usual and unchallenged way to write this name would be Yna. I think this is a variation of Ina, pronounce EYE-na in English and EE-na in Spanish.

However, as Izzy mentions, in certain kinds of advertising or promotions, all kinds of changes are made to the usual spelling and pronunciation of words.
_______

Sometimes, though, there is a foreign prefix to the last name, such as de, del, al, etc. There are different rules about the prefixes from each language, so the best thing here is to pay close attention to the correct spelling of these names. Sometimes these prefixes are capitalized -- always at the beginning of a sentence -- and sometimes they are not.

Examples of some non-capitalized foreign last names would be like these in the New York Times:

  • ... of this year that both Leslie Oudin andde Villiers admitted their affair ... De Villiers, who has been coaching Oudin since she was 9, ...

  • From a distance, del Potro looks far older than his 20 years 11 months. ... On his day off, del Potro is primed to support his team in its ...

  • Abdel Basset Ali al-Megrahi at the airport in Glasgow, clutching his ...
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    Thanks a lot, Rachel.


    SmileIzzy loves you allSmile
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