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Reply by bearbear

Thanks, but what do we call " There has been" ? How about the usage in examples?

Definite or indefinite article

Hi there, What article would you use in the following sentence: The earth revolves around the sun at a (or the) rate 365 1/4 days per year. I think both the options are possible. Am I wrong? Thank you in advance for your help.Read More...
Hi, Eternal Hope, I would revise the entire sentence: The earth revolves around the sun every 365 1/4 days.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Reply by Doc V

Re: out
Please! Is it possible to leave Alice Cooper's classic rock anthem "School's Out" (1972) out of this discussion? "School's Out" by Alice...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hello, bear_bear, This is a typical case in which the present perfect is required to refer to a state or an action extending from the...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Fujibei: I find the headline extremely unclear with the contraction of "was" and "not" ("wasn't"). I believe that the intended...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

I've never heard "all honey and no sting," bear_bear, but it's clearly a reference to bees. Bees make honey (which is good from the...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: out
Hi, bear_bear: "When the school was out " means "when the school was not in session ." That is my own definition. Some dictionaries do...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Yama, The sentence "It is sensitive of you to consider the feelings of the others" is grammatical; however, from a semantic...
David, Moderator

Where are the replies to old posts?

I've searched the forum for a topic that I've posted before but I can't view the reply. How can I view the replies? An example is the post with the title "Past" At 8:30 yesterday, we were watching TV. I usually see the past cont. used in this sentence and similar ones and I wonder why the past simple is not used. At 8:30 yesterday, we watched TV.Read More...
Here you go, Rasha. Two replies are associated with this thread: Gustavo's excellent answer and your thank-you note to him. For the sake of thoroughness, I am quoting both posts and showing you everything I see on my end. If any member reading this has any idea what "CONTENT TYPE RECIPE CONDITION" might mean, please share your thoughts. That is the category under which all the posts that went "missing" in the transplant are listed. To reiterate, I have reason to believe that "Approve Reply"...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

out

What does it mean? out Eg: In the evening when the school was out, two strangers at the school gate greeted Peter.Read More...
Please! Is it possible to leave Alice Cooper's classic rock anthem "School's Out" (1972) out of this discussion? "School's Out" by Alice Cooper I agree with David, that "out", when referring to school, usually means that there is a holiday break, but it can also simply refer to the end of the day, as in your example. Of course, in the context of the song, "out" can mean "out of fashion", or "unpopular". Bear_bear, you surely have access to a dictionary that can advise you of many meanings of...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

all honey and no sting

Could you tell me the meaning and example of the idiom - all honey and no sting? Even I search through the Internet, but I failed to get the meaning. Thanks.Read More...
I've never heard "all honey and no sting," bear_bear, but it's clearly a reference to bees. Bees make honey (which is good from the standpoint of customary human perception), and bees sting (which is bad from the standpoint of customary human perception). Thus, if someone were said to be all honey and no sting, the idea would be that she is sweet and kind and never causes anyone any harm. Here is a related idiom which is much more common: "all bark and no bite."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

a moment that wasn't

The headline of a CNN news of August 11 reads, "In Trump's White House, Charlottesville was a moment that wasn't." What does "Charlottesville was a moment that wasn't" mean?Read More...
Hi, Fujibei: I find the headline extremely unclear with the contraction of "was" and "not" ("wasn't"). I believe that the intended meaning is the one that would stand out if "was" and "not" were not contracted and if "was" were stressed: In Trump's White House, Charlottesville was a moment that was not I think that the simple past-tense form of "be" ("was") is being used in the sense of "exist." In Trump's White House, Charlottesville (i.e., the event that occurred in Charlottesville a year...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Reply by navi

Thank you very much, DocV, Your replies are great and are always appreciated. You, Gustavo and David are doing a wonderful job on this...

Reply by Doc V

Navi, I find your examples (1) and (2) grammatical, but I would prefer to substitute "because of" for "for". To me, this makes the...

Reply by Doc V

Thanks again, Ahmed. These links are very helpful. I especially appreciate the Collins link. In my experience, "doing math" refers, not...

Reply by ahmed_btm

At your command, DOC V. LDOCE: https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/do 10 study [ transitive ] British English to study a particular...
ahmed_btm

punctuation - how would you punctuate this?

I wrote this sentence yesterday and was wondering if I punctuated it correctly: "Headlines today include Don "lashing", "raging" and "slamming." I'm getting tired of this languaging (& behavior)." wondering if the commas go inside or outside the series of quotes.Read More...
So, regarding point 1, I hope you understand and appreciate my suggestions. Regarding 2, it always helps when our members describe what constraints they are under. And, as I said, the language is evolving. It could very well be that in a few years, "languaging" will be considered a perfectly cromulent word. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

for what he did

Are these sentences correct: 1) He is a bad person for what he did to you. 2) He is not a good person for what he did to you. Does '2' mean the same as '1'? Is it ambiguous? I think it can mean: 3) What he did to you doesn't make him a good person. but I don't know if it could also mean the same as '1'. Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Thank you very much, DocV, Your replies are great and are always appreciated. You, Gustavo and David are doing a wonderful job on this forum. You know exactly why I'm asking a question and what I'm looking for. You guys are great. I hope that the old posts will be restored. So many hours of work went into their production. Gratefully and respectfully, NaviRead More...
Last Reply By navi · First Unread Post
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