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Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, wpc205, Sorry for not answering this question -- which you had published some time ago -- earlier. The point is I didn't have at the...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hello, Manaka, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. Actually, your question is not about grammar, but, being your first question, I'll...
Gustavo, Contributor

subject vs genre

Hi, If you're searching for a book in the library, you can do a search by title, author, or subject. Would genre be the same thing as subject? Thank you for your help.Read More...
Hello, Manaka, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. Actually, your question is not about grammar, but, being your first question, I'll help you all the same. In a library you can find poetry (lyric genre), plays (drama), fiction (narrative genre: novels and short stories), and non-fiction. In this Wikipedia article you can find a long list of different types of books. "subject" means an altogether different thing, being closer to "topic" or "theme." For example, you can find books of...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, Subhajit123, As I told you in this other thread which you seem to have overlooked, the article "the" before postmodified plural...
Gustavo, Contributor

Usage of the

Is the needed in the following sentences? What does the sentences with and without the mean? ( The ) people who stand by you in your tough times are the best friends of yours. This notice is for ( the ) people who want to donate blood in the camp near the university ground. (The) students who used to read at this school are very successful now. Nikolas Maduro betrayed (the) people who voted for him. Another question, please tell me is it necessary to use the ? 5- John: What do you think...Read More...
Hi, Subhajit123, As I told you in this other thread which you seem to have overlooked, the article "the" before postmodified plural nouns seems to have a totalizing effect ( all the students, all the people). Only in (1) is "the" actually required, and that is because the subject complement is quite definite: 1. The people who stand by you in your tough times are the best friends of yours (I prefer: your best friends ). When the article is not there, it may sound more natural to use "some"...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

How "much" emissions or how "many" emissions?

The following is what I found in the website of US Energy Information Administration. Is the word "emissions" usually used with "much" as in the quotation? If so, why is the verb "are" used instead of "is?" How much of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions are associated with electricity generation?Read More...
Hi, Fujibei, This question: https://www.eia.gov/tools/faqs/faq.php?id=77&t=11 does appear in U.S. EIA site and seems to be quoted by other scientific publications. "how much" refers to the volume of the emissions. "how many" could perhaps be used to refer to different instances or occurrences of emission, which is not the meaning that wants to be conveyed. I would definitely have used "is" instead of "are": - How much of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions is associated with electricity...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Capitalisation

I have seen some grammar advice that suggests one should capitalise the name of a document even if the name is also a description of the document. For example, if I am writing a business plan and the title of the document written on the front page is "Business Plan", I should refer to the document as the Business Plan rather than the business plan. What are people's views on this? Does the need to capitalise change if we are referring to the document in the plural. For example if I was to...Read More...
Hi, wpc205, Sorry for not answering this question -- which you had published some time ago -- earlier. The point is I didn't have at the time -- and still don't have -- any source to support my reply other than my experience as a translator, which has allowed me to see and analyze different types of texts. In English there is indeed a strong tendency to capitalize nouns if they refer to a term of key importance within a text. The capitals will tend to be dropped if the noun is used in the...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

New Member

Reply by Taney Roniger

Thank you so much for all the great feedback, DocV. I really appreciate it. I know what you mean about the two men in question, but I...

Usage Of Plural Nouns With And Without 'The'

Hi there, can I use the plural nouns in the given sentences with and without the . What difference in meaning does the create in the sentences? And as an English speaker which one sounds best to your ears? John, I have been to many countries in my life. I can tell you one thing that (the) people in America are politically very aware. (The) students at this school are diligent, intelligent and smart. As an ESL learner it confuses me a lot because I have seen sentences like these are used both...Read More...
Hi, Subhajit123, Before dealing with the article issue, please notice that "be aware" requires the preposition "of" if the object one is aware of is mentioned (in this case, the object is "one thing"). Also pay more attention to your spelling. In such cases, even if you refer to all the people or all the teachers (and not to some specific ones), you can use the definite article. I'd say that in this particular case the definite article makes the phrase more comprehensive than the zero...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Reply by Doc V

Taney, Thank you for sharing this beautiful piece of poetic prose. Now that I understand it for what it is, I'll say that many...

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Ahmed, Use: 'interview'. For more information, See: https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/interview
ahmed_btm

Reply by Taney Roniger

Thanks, DocV. I'm very glad to be here. The sentence in question appears in the first paragraph of an essay I'm writing on form in...

Reply by Doc V

Ahmed, Do you think that the "no" could be omitted if we understand "the outside world" to mean the immediate natural setting, rather...

Reply by Doc V

I find Taney's sentence very interesting and poetic, but before commenting on it I would like to see it in the context of the paragraph,...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hello, Disha, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. I've edited your post as follows: Correct senten c es - I have a query ... - So, are...
Gustavo, Contributor

Ellipsis of subject in comparative constructions

Please compare these 2 sentences. source: https://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/overqualified In sentence 1, there is a blank after "than", while, in a similar case, sentence 2, a "what" is put in that blank. I want to make sure if, in both of the the sentences above, a what is optional. A relevant sentence: 3, As (it) appears from her essay, she has read widely in Romantic literature. (CGEL by Quirk et al) Is "it" in this case optional?Read More...
I know. This is the typical case where one has to find the rule by comparing examples. My first question is, why is this sentence incorrect?: a. The apples are fresher than were bought yesterday. I think it has to do with the lack of identity between the current apples and the ones bought yesterday. My first impression is that, for "as" and "than" to work in reduced clauses, there must be actual or potential identity between the two things being compared. b. lf you are overqualified for a...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Correct sentences

Hi I have a query related to the appropriateness of a sentence. Positive sentence- I eat meat. Negative sentence- I do not eat meat. Interrogative sentence- Do I eat meat? So, are the sentence forms correct?Read More...
Thank you. I will keep in mind about the title thing.Read More...
Last Reply By Disha · First Unread Post

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Egyptian2017, Your sentence lacks 'no' above. There is an overlap between the meaning of 'contact' and communication here. Although...
ahmed_btm

Reply by David, Moderator

That's not the way this website works. Each discussion thread should be devoted to one particular grammatical topic, and the example...
David, Moderator

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

If you use "it," I understand you mentioned the tree in the previous sentence. I find this paragraph to be fine: - I like the tree . No...
Gustavo, Contributor

Little

Hello, Is there any problem with any of the following ? 1- little sleep isn't good. 2- little time of sleep isn't good. 3- little time of sleeping isn't good. 4- sleeping little isn't good. 5- sleeping for ( a) little time isn't good. Thanks in advance.Read More...
Last Reply By menem · First Unread Post

Reply by Taney Roniger

Okay, great -- thank you so much! But I guess what I was worried about was that the first part of the sentence is modifying the subject...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hello, Taney Roniger, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. I will focus on the second part of the sentence. If we consider that "about"...
Gustavo, Contributor

Questionable sentence

Hi, I'm working on an essay that contains the following sentence: "No taller than two men and naked and spindly, there ought to be nothing remarkable about it." The "it" here refers to a tree, which was the subject of the previous sentence. I like the sentence the way it is, but it seems more grammatically correct to say: "No taller than two men and naked and spindly, it ought to have nothing remarkable about it" -- but this feels awkward. Is the first sentence permissible? I'd love your...Read More...
Thank you so much for all the great feedback, DocV. I really appreciate it. I know what you mean about the two men in question, but I figured the reader would make the adjustment in her mind. I'll give it some thought. Thank you for "wrested"! I was indeed wondering about that. Re: "by some stroke of happenstance...", the word "manufacture" always felt too industrial to me. And perhaps "happenstance" isn't right either. I wonder if it was the words or the structure that you found...Read More...
Last Reply By Taney Roniger · First Unread Post

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Abo Hamza, 'That' is the correct answer as it is preceded by 'all' . 'Which' is the correct answer'. 'Which' replaces 'it' (one...
ahmed_btm

choose the correct answer

COULD YOU TELL ME THE BEST ANSWER AND WHY, PLEASE? 1-I am grateful for all ( which, what, that) I have. 2-A destination is referred to as a place(when, whose, which, where) one visits for one's holiday. 3-(Either, neither, every, Each) one of the boxers will stop boxing until the other defeated.Read More...
That's not the way this website works. Each discussion thread should be devoted to one particular grammatical topic, and the example sentence(s) should relate to that topic, as should the title of the thread. Here you have simply asked for answers to a random set of test questions, each of which has nothing to do with the other, and issued a command ("choose the correct answer") as the title of the thread. If you start a thread like this in the future, please expect to have it deleted.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Reply by Robby zhu

Thanks. I get it. In that construction , "with" introduces a tool. Sorry about the capitalization. I so address you because I remember...

Reply by David, Moderator

No, that doesn't work. I see what you're trying to do. You want to rescue your passive construction from ungrammaticality by changing it...
David, Moderator

Camping

I love camping because there is .............. with the outside world. ( connection - conduct - contact - communication )Read More...
Ahmed, Do you think that the "no" could be omitted if we understand "the outside world" to mean the immediate natural setting, rather than the city from which we have momentarily escaped? Even if so, I agree that 'contact', 'communication', 'connection' and '[a] link' are all possible answers here. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Reply by Robby zhu

Thanks, david and GUSTAVO. I just came up with another version( according to GUSTAVO's "not ditransitive" analysis): Adjectives can be...

Reply by David, Moderator

If you made that replacement, the sentence would be ungrammatical: * Most adjectives can be changed into adverbs by being added "-ly."...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Kyle, No, that sentence isn't correct. The adverbial of duration, "(for) a long time now ," is incompatible with the past tense. One...
David, Moderator

Reply by Robby zhu

1, So if the verb is ditransitive, both of the following sentences are correct and mean the same ? -Most people can be made happy by...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, Robby zhu, "add" is not a ditransitive verb, where both the direct and the indirect object can become the subject of the passive.
Gustavo, Contributor

Sentence

Hi! Can anyone tell me whether or not this sentence is grammatically correct? My science teacher was teaching there a long time now. Shouldn't it be " My science teacher has been teaching there for a long time."?Read More...
Hi, Kyle, No, that sentence isn't correct. The adverbial of duration, "(for) a long time now ," is incompatible with the past tense. One possible revision is the one you've suggested. Here is another possible revision, which gives a different meaning. Which you should choose depends on whether the teacher still teaches there. My science teacher was teaching there (for) a long time. My science teacher taught there (for) a long time.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post
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