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Reply by john121

Thanks. Brilliant reply. I just need one last thing clearing up. Can you please tell me, i read something online which puzzled me "...

Reply by davidmoderator

Hi, Hussein: The normal, native expression is not "all day round"; it's " the whole day round." If you search for that phrase, you will...
davidmoderator

Reply by husseinhassan

Thanks, Gustavo for your reply. Another question popped into my head: with regard to the time indication "all day ROUND", I don't know...
husseinhassan

Reply by gustavocontributor

Hi, Hussein, I agree that the sentence is strange as it is, and that using the past perfect in the first coordinate clause and the past...
gustavocontributor

sequence of tenses

husseinhassan
Good morning, our teacherS, From The General Secondary Education Certificate Examination of Egypt, 2018: 1. I worked hard all day round, but I had failed to ___________ my goals. ( find / follow / score / achieve ) Sure, "achieve" is the correct choice, but I wonder whether the sentence is MEANINGFULLY correct or not. Note the tenses sequence, i.e. Wh ich action logically should happen first? Shouldn't it be: 2. I HAD WORKED hard all day round, but I FAILED to achieve my goals. Or 3. I HAD...Read More...
Hi, Hussein: The normal, native expression is not "all day round"; it's " the whole day round." If you search for that phrase, you will reap a nice harvest of results. I agree with Gustavo's answer. I'd also like to mention that it is perfectly fine to use the past simple in both clauses, to omit the repeated subject from the second clause, and to use "all day." You do not have to use "all the day" instead of "all day" if the period of time is completed. "All day" is correct in both cases.Read More...
Last Reply By davidmoderator · First Unread Post

Reply by gustavocontributor

Re: soon
Hi, bear_bear, 1(c) is the only one that is wrong, because there "soon" interferes between "time" and "for lunch": the phrase is "time...
gustavocontributor

Reply by ahmedbtm

Hi, John and welcome to the new platform, Well, first of all, you should have mentioned the source of your questions and chosen a better...
ahmedbtm

Reply by ahmedbtm

Hi, Ayman and happy Eid al-Fitr, As for me, as a non-native speaker, I always teach students what they have in their books. In fact,...
ahmedbtm

Reply by ahmedbtm

Hi, Thienan, and welcome to the G.E's new platform, 'Rather than' can be used either as a conjunction or a preposition. It can be...
ahmedbtm

When it rains, it pours vs It never rains, but it pours

"When it rains, it pours".Have you ever heard that idiom before? I would like to know does it same in meaning with "It never rains but it pours". Thanks.Read More...
Hi, bearbear, Yes. Both of them mean misfortunes seldom come singly. I also agree with the writer 'Joe Devney' that using 'but' in 'It never rains but it pours' is a bit unusual. See his opinion here: https://www.quora.com/What-doe...ns-but-it-pours-mean BTW, you should say: I would like to know if it has the same meaning as: .........Read More...
Last Reply By ahmedbtm · First Unread Post

participle subject advice needed

Hi And thanks for reading this post. I am trying to find the reason for errors in writing. Being a guy, *it is hard for him to understand her point of view. Having heard this before, *her patience was wearing thin. Being very rational, *speaking frankly was a very important to him. Wounding like an arrow, *he sometimes hated to hear the truth. Mentioned as constructive criticism,*there were no hard feelings. The explanation is: When a participle clause is placed before a clause, the...Read More...
Thanks. Brilliant reply. I just need one last thing clearing up. Can you please tell me, i read something online which puzzled me " Phrases that describe should be placed close to what they describe." Can you expand on this, is there a manner in which descrpitive phrases should be laid out. Many thanks.Read More...
Last Reply By john121 · First Unread Post

Verb form after "rather than"

Sometimes I see to infinitive and V-ing used after rather than. Can you please explain the correct use to me?Read More...
Hi, Thienan, and welcome to the G.E's new platform, 'Rather than' can be used either as a conjunction or a preposition. It can be followed by 'a bare infinitive' or 'ing' . Rachel, our great late moderator, gives more detailed information about 'rather than' as a conjunction (or a "quasi-coordinator' according to Quirk) and as a preposition on the following link: https://thegrammarexchange.inf...-than-and-instead-of On 'A Practical English Grammar' (4th ed):Read More...
Last Reply By ahmedbtm · First Unread Post

soon

Which position is correct? Are they same in meaning in any positions? 1 (a) It was soon time for lunch. (b) It was time for lunch soon. (c) It was time soon for lunch. 2 (a) Father lay down and dozed off soon. (b) Father lay down and soon dozed off.Read More...
Hi, bear_bear, 1(c) is the only one that is wrong, because there "soon" interferes between "time" and "for lunch": the phrase is "time for lunch," and it cannot be split. The difference between 1(a) and 1(b), as well as between 2(a) and 2(b), is subtle. I prefer 1(a) and 2(b) because the end position gives too much importance to an adverb of time that does not contribute much meaning. When the adverbial provides more information, then the final position may be justified: 1(d) It was time for...Read More...
Last Reply By gustavocontributor · First Unread Post

Reply by davidmoderator

Hello, Ayman: In order to be able to address that question properly, I think we (we here at G.E.) need to know which "we" you are...
davidmoderator

Reply by davidmoderator

Hi, Ruifeng: Sorry for the delay. The awkwardness of your sentences was a bit of a turn-off at first, and then your question slid down...
davidmoderator

Formal or informal English

Hi, I have this question concerning teaching English (grammar): Should we teach formal English only or we should teach the informal form too?Read More...
Hi, Ayman and happy Eid al-Fitr, As for me, as a non-native speaker, I always teach students what they have in their books. In fact, that has been Okaasan's advice to me. So, when our books mention something informal, I refer to it and connect my explanation with the exam. For example, our books say: I wish there was/were something I was interested in. I tell my students that both 'was' and 'were' after 'wish' here are correct, but 'were' is preferable . If they have to choose between them...Read More...
Last Reply By ahmedbtm · First Unread Post

Reply by davidmoderator

Hello again, Navi: To me, that can't mean that she talked to you as if you were a child. That is not a possible meaning. What (5) means...
davidmoderator

Reply by navi

Thank you very much, David, What do you think of: 5) She talked to me like a child. Would that work if she talked to me as if I were a...

Reply by davidmoderator

Hello, Navi: These are interesting specimens. In my estimation, (1) and (2) work, the comma making no difference as to meaning; and (3)...
davidmoderator

Reply by davidmoderator

Hello, Sadra, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! The sentence "He screamed while being shot at" is neither wrong nor uncommon. The...
davidmoderator

like a wild animal

Are these sentences correct: 1) They threw him in a cage like a wild animal. 2) They threw him in a cage, like a wild animal. 3) He threw me a bone like a dog. 4) He threw me a bone, like a dog. Does the comma change anything? Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Hello again, Navi: To me, that can't mean that she talked to you as if you were a child. That is not a possible meaning. What (5) means is that she was like a child when she talked to you; that is, she talked to you in a childish manner. In informal dialectal English, you might very well hear " She talked to me like I was a child ," and that, of course, would have the "as if I were a child" meaning. As you know, one alternative to using "as if I were a child" or "like I was a child" is to...Read More...
Last Reply By davidmoderator · First Unread Post

grammar issue

hi is this sentence grammatically wrong or just uncommon : he screamed while being shot at.Read More...
Hello, Sadra, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! The sentence "He screamed while being shot at" is neither wrong nor uncommon. The sentence is grammatically correct, and the grammatical structures it contains are common. What is it about the sentence that perplexes you or causes you to worry that it might be wrong? Are you familiar with reduced adverbial clauses, the progressive passive, and the prepositional passive? The sentence means the same thing as "He screamed while he was being...Read More...
Last Reply By davidmoderator · First Unread Post

Reply by davidmoderator

Swan has contradicted himself with his own example, unfortunately. The assertion that "[t]he past continuous is used to express repeated...
davidmoderator

Reply by ahmedbtm

Yes, I think so. I once had a discussion with Rachel about the use of 'would' and 'used to'. You could read it on the following link:...
ahmedbtm

Usage and omission of "the"

Hi there, can anyone please tell me if I can omit the in the following sentence? Is the in the following sentence optional? (The) villagers in this village are very rich because they use modern technology for cultivation. And one more question, I was watching a cricket match and I heard a commentator (a native speaker) saying "The match is in an interesting stage. Indian fans are shouting for Virat Kohli and his team." Don't you think it should be " the Indian fans are shouting for Virat...Read More...
Hello, Subhajit123, I find that "the" is required because we are speaking about specific villagers, those living in "this village." That noun phrase is comparable to " the inhabitants of this village." Strictly speaking, "the" is necessary as it refers to the Indian fans watching the match, but I think it can be acceptably omitted in speech. Please note that in your explanation you are mixing up the people who are chanting with the police trying to stop them. I find the first omission of the...Read More...
Last Reply By gustavocontributor · First Unread Post

Reply by ceedhanna

And What about This (The past continuous is used to express repeated or habitual actions in the past that were temporary: At that time,...
ceedhanna
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