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Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Yama, Allow me to clear two points here: The way native speakers use 'will' and 'be going to' is totally different from ours. A...
ahmed_btm

give me time vs give me a time

Hello! I know that ''time" can be both countable and uncountable, and has different meanings. When I ask someone to give me time, I mean that I need time to think something over, and I don't want to make a hasty decision. In what context can I use "give me a time"? My only guess is when I want to make an appointment and ask the interlocutor to propose any convenient time.Read More...

Use of the word already

Is that a correct usage of the word already in the example sentence given below? Please suggest any other word or phrase if it is better suited here. Example : Give her the prize already! Little bit of context : I was watching a video on Facebook in which a beauty pageant contestant answered a question so well that that I felt like there's no need to ask her any more questions.Read More...

will - are going to

Hello. Could you please help me? Which form is correct or both? Simple explanation please. You (will - are going to) pick up all of those toys right now. This room is a mess! Thank you.Read More...

Reply by Yama

According to what you said, In the following question, I should use "will" instead of "going to". The doctors predicted that the patient...

Present Perfect or Simple past In this sentence?

Could you guys see this sentence and say if I should use Present Perfect or Past Simple? I think it is Past Simple, because it sounds odd using the Present Perfect tense. Although, I think I should use the present perfect tense because there no time expression either here in the sentence, nor in the context. **Furthermore could you tell why it was used Simple Past or Present Perfect?**Read More...
Hello, Harry O'Neil, Stories are always narrated in the past tense, so you should use the Past Simple even if there are no time adverbials: - Once upon a time there was a man who had everything and still wasn't happy => This story is about a man who had everything and still wasn't happy.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hello, jccohen, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. As far as I know, "would" cannot be used to express subjunctive. It is a modal verb...
Gustavo, Contributor

as-would tense

Hello, what is the mood or tense of the following sentence: "she finds the same thrill in playing football as other girls would in dolls or sewing" Is that the conditional or the subjunctive or some other?? thanks!Read More...
Hello, jccohen, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. As far as I know, "would" cannot be used to express subjunctive. It is a modal verb that can be used to express different ideas: future from a past perspective, obstinacy or persistency in the past, express or implied conditions of a tentative nature, etc. In your sentence, an implied condition is involved: - She finds the same thrill in playing football as other girls would in dolls or sewing = She finds the same thrill in playing...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Evy, I agree with Gustavo's answer completely and would simply like to add that "whom" is also possible, in a formal register, in...
David, Moderator

Reply by navi

Thank you very much, Gustavo, I think in '3' suggests that we are speaking about the same kind of talent while '4' is ambiguous (one...

gap in time between two actions

hi all. Please have a look at the sentence below. Of all the three options, are A had B imply that he went in immediately after gazing, while C suggests there is a gap in time between "gazing" and "going in"? He ________the display for several minutes before re-entering his shop. A gazed at B had gazed at C had been gazing atRead More...
Hi, Robby zhu, In the absence of any further information (context) to the contrary, (A) and (B) do suggest that he re-entered his shop immediately after gazing at the display. Answer (C) does not suggest what you think it might. I see no justification for using the past perfect progressive there, but it works in the following example: He had been running from the authorities for years before getting caught. In that example, the past perfect progressive indicates that his running from the...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, Pal, "for" can introduce clauses of reason. It is a formal conjunction equivalent to "because" but, unlike "because," "for" does not...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, Evy, "whom" is the object form of "who" and, most of the times, "who" can be used instead, the only difference being that "whom" is...
Gustavo, Contributor
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