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Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Of course you don't. Answering questions to the best of our knowledge is our mission here (actually, nobody forces us to do so), so we...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by npexp

Ok thanks, that makes sense! Is the same true for: Jack is both a good student and a talented soccer player --> Are "both...and" also...

smell the bread bake

I can smell the bread _______ . a. bake b. baked c. baking Are they all correct? What are the differences? Thanks!Read More...

Reply by Doc V

They are both grammatically correct. Personally, I prefer: 3: There are two very good restaurants by the park. Note that in (2), "they"...

Reply by Doc V

David, These both work. I didn't know I could do this on the new platform. Thanks again. DocV

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Coco, You've asked a very interesting question. I agree with DocV's answer and would like to add that everything relates here to...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Sedo and Ahmed, I agree with your answer, Ahmed. Both the singular and the plural form are commonly used in that construction by...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, DocV, When logged in, all members should be able to access their individual posting histories by clicking on their display name at...
David, Moderator

too vs so

Which is more suitable? 1. Children can be SO naughty sometimes. 2. Children can be TOO naughty sometimes.Read More...

Reply by Doc V

Re: Wish
I agree with what Gustavo says, and I'd like to add a few thoughts of my own. 1a: I wish I could lead a healthier lifestyle. 1b: I wish...

Reply by ahmed_btm

Yes, the correct answer here is: d) so Thank you Doc V for answering this question in particular and clarifying the fabrication of this...
ahmed_btm

Reply by Doc V

Again, does the book have a name? I don't know where your colleague heard that rule, but it's not correct. Rather, "such" precedes a...

Reply by Doc V

Sorry, Ahmed. As often happens, I was in the middle of writing my reply when you posted yours. DocV

Reply by Doc V

Yama, Just yesterday, on the Either or all thread, you wrote: You may recall that the most significant mistake was failure to cite the...

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Yama, Yes, 'each' is the best answer here. It is clear that there are more than two persons here, so 'both' and 'either' can't be...
ahmed_btm

Reply by Doc V

Cocoricot, (2) is a different structure than (1) because "himself" is the object of the preposition "of". If we omit "himself", we are...

Reply by Doc V

David, You wrote: How do I access my posting history? Thank you very much in advance, DocV

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, poet, May I ask about the name of this book? There are two possible answers here. Both 'have to' and 'will have to' are correct answers.
ahmed_btm

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Sedo, The answer is: 'both'. In fact, your example above is wholly taken from Michael Swan, page: 522. He says: "After expressions...
ahmed_btm

Singular or plural

Could you please help me answer this? Choose: She is one of the few women who ......climbed Everest. A. has B. have C. BothRead More...
Hi, Sedo and Ahmed, I agree with your answer, Ahmed. Both the singular and the plural form are commonly used in that construction by native speakers. The strict correctness of using the plural, however, becomes obvious when one rearranges the sentence: (B1) She is one of the few women who have climbed Mount Everest . (B2) Of the few women who have climbed Mount Everest , she is one. (B3) * Of the few women who has climbed Mount Everest , she is one .Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

will have to

you .............get up early tomorrow if you want to catch the bus. (have to/will have to/don't have to/don't) the answer in the book (don't have to) why can't I choose (will have to)Read More...
Hi, poet, May I ask about the name of this book? There are two possible answers here. Both 'have to' and 'will have to' are correct answers.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Leave or omit object?

cocoricot
Dear teachers, 1. "The coffee is too hot for me to drink the coffee." I know that I can omit the second "the coffee" because it is redundant. There is no need to repeat it because it is clear that everyone knows it. -> The coffee is too hot for me to drink. 2. "Peter is too young to take care of himself." Is it a similar case? Does it mean that 'himself' can also be omitted? Please explain to me. Thanks.Read More...
Hello, Coco, You've asked a very interesting question. I agree with DocV's answer and would like to add that everything relates here to subject and object within infinitive clauses. You might not be accustomed to thinking of infinitive constructions as clauses, but they are: they have a subject and a predicate. But the verb in infintiive clauses lacks tense. That's why they are referred to as nonfinite clauses. (1a) The coffee is too hot for me to drink. (1b) The coffee is too hot to drink.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Reply by cocoricot

Thank you, David, for your reply. I will join the forum as often as possible. I wish all of you happiness and good health. Thank you for...
cocoricot

won't have to or don't have to

you ..... ..........come if you don't want to. (won't have to or don't have to)Read More...
Hello, Poet20, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! This appears to be an exercise from a workbook or perhaps an item from a test. It is OK for members to ask questions about such items, but we encourage members to do more than simply present the exercise. Try to say why you feel uncertain of the answer, or tell us which answer you think is right. The answer to your exercise is "don't have to": " You don't have to come if you don't want to ." The other answer, "won't have to," is not...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Reply by David, Moderator

Dear Coco, Welcome back! Yes, you've made it back to the Grammar Exchange. We've missed you. I believe this is the first post you've...
David, Moderator

So or such

Help me with this question taken from our school book. It's ........... hot outside that I can't go shopping. a) enough b) too c) such d) so I think the answer is (d). But one of my colleagues told me the answer was (c) because" it Is " or " it was " should be followed by " Such ". Please, let me know which is right. Thanks.Read More...
Yes, the correct answer here is: d) so Thank you Doc V for answering this question in particular and clarifying the fabrication of this rule. Regrettably, it isn't one of Yama's colleagues who mentioned that fabricated information above. That information is mentioned in one of our outside books which thousands of pupils and hundreds of teachers trust. The puzzle is that the sentence above is written correctly in our student book page 32. It says: It is so hot outside …. . I wonder from which...Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Reply by Yama

Is there any other difference between " So " and " very " other than the one mentioned above in the quotation? I'm asking because the...

Are both or both are

Which sentence of these two is more correct? 1- There are two restaurants by the park and they are both very good. 2- There are two restaurants by the park and they both are very good. Let me know which one is right. If they both are correct, let me know if there is a difference in meaning. As usual, I really appreciate it. Thanks in advance.Read More...
They are both grammatically correct. Personally, I prefer: 3: There are two very good restaurants by the park. Note that in (2), "they" can be omitted: 2a: There are two restaurants by the park and both are very good. You can't do that with (1). DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Both or each

grandmother says that my brothers and I can ........... take a cake from the kitchen. 1- each 2- every 3- both 4- either I guess the suitable answer is (1). But, I'm not sure. If I'm right, I don't know why (3) isn't suitable. Thanks in advance.Read More...
DocV, I'm honored to share you the same opinion.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Re: Wish
Yes, I think you are on the right track. "I wish I could lead..." is equivalent to "I wish I were able to lead...," as if something...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by KES

Re: Wish
Thanks for the quick reply! I've just noticed my typo. I should have written led not lead in my second example. The nuance still remains...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Re: Wish
Hello, Kes, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! No, Kes, you need what we call "unreal past" to express a wish about the present or the...
Gustavo, Contributor

Wish

Hi there, Just want to double check something here. Q. Write a sentence with 'wish'. I don't get enough exercise. I wish I could lead a healthier lifestyle. But, is 'I wish I lead a healthier lifestyle' possible? Could is better in this case because there is a possibility of it being true? What are your thoughts?Read More...
I agree with what Gustavo says, and I'd like to add a few thoughts of my own. 1a: I wish I could lead a healthier lifestyle. 1b: I wish I led a healthier lifestyle. As Gustavo says, (1a) is used by someone who wants to lead a healthier lifestyle, but can't; something is preventing him. The same person could say (1b) instead, but there are a number of other circumstances where (1b) might be used. For example, he may have just noticed how bad his habits are, and feels ashamed. Kes, you wrote:...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

New Member

Reply by Yama

Thanks for your help. I'm truly sorry for any unintended mistakes. I'll do my best to avoid these mistakes again. Thanks again.

Reply by Yama

I'm not annoyed at all. On the contrary, I wanted to show my pleasure. Maybe it's my bad English or something else that made you think...

Use "they" when you don't know the gender.

1 If I don't know the gender, I should use "they", not "that person or this person" in the present. Ex: a I should say "If you meet someone today, they'd better be a doctor." not "If you meet someone today, that person / this person had better be a doctor.". b I should say "I'm looking for someone reasonable from the FBI to mediate my situation, and I'd be very grateful if I could find them (not that person / this person)." c I should say "When you pray for someone—how does your prayer...Read More...

Reply by Doc V

I agree with Hussein. An exception can be made if you have just finished climbing the hill, in which case it is possible to say That was...

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Azz, What an interesting batch of sentences. They are all certifiably bad, but none of them is certifiably ungrammatical. In the...
David, Moderator

figure out how to complain

a. He has yet to come across a book he can't figure out how to complain about. b. He has yet to come across a problem he can't find someone to solve. c. He has never met a man he didn't know how to find fault with. d. He has never met someone he couldn't find a way to deal with. Are the above sentences grammatical? I know one can end sentences with prepositions. That is not a problem for me. Many thanks.Read More...
Hi, Azz, What an interesting batch of sentences. They are all certifiably bad, but none of them is certifiably ungrammatical. In the linguistic literature, they would receive question marks, not ungrammaticality asterisks. Each of your sentences contains a syntactic island violation. In (a) and (c), you are trying to relativize an element contained in embedded questions; in (b) and (d), you are trying to relativize an element that itself comes from a relative clause. Relative clauses and...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Reply by Doc V

And did this book have a name? Never mind. I found the source (an "outside book" called The Best ) with the help of an Egyptian friend...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

In keeping with the same line of thought I followed here , I'd use (3) so , Yama. I'd reserve too for a context in which some negative...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

The structure is formed by two coordinated noun phrases, with "not only" and "but (also)" being the coordinating conjunctions.
Gustavo, Contributor

It Is/Was The Hardest Thing I Have..

Hi there, Should I use is or was with present perfect tense "I have ever done" in the following context? Here's the context: A year ago, I climbed to the top of a hill after trying for three hours. Oh my God, that is/was the hardest thing I have ever done.Read More...
I agree with Hussein. An exception can be made if you have just finished climbing the hill, in which case it is possible to say That was the hardest thing I have ever done. But it is never wrong to use "is" in that sentence. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Help with grammatical terminology please

Can a grammar bod help me to explain what is missing in this sentence. I need the proper grammatical terminology! " Approximately 15% chance of failure if a person had one previously, or 25% if a person has had two." Obviously this sentence is a fragment, it needs something added like "There is an approximately 15%..." to make is a proper sentence (or rewriting). But what's the grammatical term for what's missing? Is it that the sentence doesn't have a subject? (Is "There is" a subject?) Or...Read More...
Hey Gustavo - this is super helpful, thanks! "grammatical subject" that's what I was after.Read More...
Last Reply By Toom · First Unread Post

fundamentally wrong and primarily wrong

Hi! I came across this IELTS grammar exercise (on this website: https://www.examenglish.com/IELTS/ielts_grammar_test2.htm ): The conclusions of the climate deniers _______ wrong. a) up to a point b) fundamentally c) primarily According to the website, the correct answer is "b) fundamentally". I don't understand why answer "c) primarily" is incorrect. I researched "primarily wrong" in Google's search box and several hits came up with this combination. I know that this is not a guarantee that...Read More...
You're right. I forgot to include the word "are". Oops! Glad you caught that! Thanks for you quick response and clear explanation!Read More...
Last Reply By shantower · First Unread Post

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, Perriced, The expression with the verb "go" is "go to the movies " (meaning: go to the movie threater). "movies" with the zero...
Gustavo, Contributor

Movies or THE movies?

Hi, She enjoys going to the movies / movies . In my mind, same meaning. Anyone care to chime in? Thanks.Read More...
Hi, Perriced, The expression with the verb "go" is "go to the movies " (meaning: go to the movie threater). "movies" with the zero article will be fine with other verbs, like: - She enjoys watching movies .Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

the free verse that is really verse...

1) Yvor Winters , the poet/critic said "the free verse that is really verse, the best that is, of W.C. Williams , H. D. , Marianne Moore , Wallace Stevens , and Ezra Pound is the antithesis of free" Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_verse#cite_ref-autogenerated1937_8-1 The Wikipedia article cites as the source of the quoted passage this book: Primitivism and Decadence: A Study of American Experimental Poetry Arrow Editions, New York, 1937 I think '1' is unambiguously saying that the...Read More...
Hi, Navi, I think there is a couple of commas missing in (1), one to close the two appositions "the poet/critic" and "the best, that is, of ... and Ezra Pound," and another to precede the reformulatory "that is." 1') Yvor Winters , the poet/critic , said "the free verse that is really verse, the best , that is, of W.C. Williams , H. D. , Marianne Moore , Wallace Stevens , and Ezra Pound , is the antithesis of free." I find "that is for instance" redundant in (2). At least, I'd separate them,...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Reply by npexp

Hey, thanks for all your answers, it's really interesting. -- 5. Jack played the guitar five months at the Music Conservatory. I agree.

Enough, so, too or such

The exam was.............. difficult for me. 1- enough 2- so 3- too 4- such Help me answer this question. Thanks in advance.Read More...
Hi, Yama, I suspect your book, or your teacher, expects you to use "too." However, "so" would also be possible. "too" is more negative, the result being that the speaker did not pass the exam. "so" would be a colloquial way of saying "very" or "rather."Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Too or so

I'm........... hungry. When will dinner be ready? 1- such a lot 2- too 3- so 4- enough I think, the answer must be 2 or 3. I have no idea which one is better. Please, let me know what you think. If possible, let me know why you chose your answer. Thanks a lot.Read More...
In keeping with the same line of thought I followed here , I'd use (3) so , Yama. I'd reserve too for a context in which some negative consequence is implied, for example: - I'm too hungry to wait two hours for dinner. I'll have a sandwich.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

So - very - too - enough

Carol had a bad experience in that shop. They were ........ rude to her for no reason. 1- so 2- very 3- too 4- enough Let me know what is the best answer. If possible, tell me why you chose it. Thanks.Read More...
Is there any other difference between " So " and " very " other than the one mentioned above in the quotation? I'm asking because the difference you mentioned won't help me much in answering other questions which aren't related to emtions. As always, thanks for your much appreciated help.Read More...
Last Reply By Yama · First Unread Post

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, Yama, "cake" is usually countable, and this sentence is no exception. The correct choice is (3): - It was such a delicious cake that...
Gustavo, Contributor
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