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Reply by Hussein Hassan

Dear Gustavo, hope that you're fine. I just was wondering if you could clarify the meaning of the verb "win" in that context. Does it...
Hussein Hassan

Usage of who

Hello, In sentence #1 below, I am curious to know whether the use of the pronoun who is wrong and why sentence # is 2 is preferable. 1. I believe I am not the only person who asks him that question. 2. I believe I am not the only person to ask him that question. thank youRead More...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, Ahmed55, Adverbials formed by "this time" + a NP indicating future are typically used with the future progressive (to indicate an...
Gustavo, Contributor

For a long time vs for long

Hi. What's the difference between these 2 phrases? Sample sentences: 1. They didn't work for long. 2. They didn't work for a long time. My guess is: Sentence 1 convey a habitual idea: during a certain period of time in the past, like maybe last year, they didn't work for long hours every day. Sentence 2, on the other hand, means there was a certain period of time that they didn't work, which is long in length. Did I get it right? Many thanks in advance.Read More...

Reply by Abdul Rahman

Hello, sir. I really appreciate every help from anyone. However, I resorted to this site for its "native" experts. We resort to this...

Auxiliary Verbs with Either & Neither

A: Mrs. Davis won’t attend the meeting. B: Mr. Johnson WON’T either. But when starting the sentence with NEITHER, speaker B said “Neither WOULD Mr. Johnson.” Would you please clarify why speaker B used WOULD with NEITHER? Why not WILL, as was the case with EITHER? Thank you very muchRead More...
Thank you very much.Read More...
Last Reply By Abdullah Mahrouse · First Unread Post

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

I forgot to mention that, as it introduces a restrictive clause, "who" would be normally dropped: - The millionaire has a very ugly girl...
Gustavo, Contributor

The future tenses

This time next week,I ..... the final match .Im confident of myself(will win/will be winning/May be winningRead More...
Dear Gustavo, hope that you're fine. I just was wondering if you could clarify the meaning of the verb "win" in that context. Does it mean: 1. "To get something as a prize" I would think it won't take much time to happen, i.e. using "win" in the progressive form is a bit awkward, isn't it? OR 2. To be most successful at a specific point during the game" like when I say: Who's winning? I guess the two meanings are different, aren't they?Read More...
Last Reply By Hussein Hassan · First Unread Post

Reply by Robby zhu

Got it and thanks for the "could fall in love" suggestion.

Reply by Yoozee

I really appreciate your response Gustavo. As new grammar challenges arise I will try to find the explanation through my own research.

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, Abdul, I endorse Ahmed's answer. Sometimes non-native members' replies help, especially if provided by experienced teachers like...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Yoozee

Hey Gustavo. Thanks for the speedy reply. I am a native English speaker who is helping a Japanese friend t o improve her E nglish...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, Robby zhu, I'd add "so" before "many boys," and use "could fall in love" instead of "fell in love." I think you need a...
Gustavo, Contributor

Use of With as a preposition

Hi. I have just been asked a grammar question by a Japanese friend and I was not 100% sure. Comparing sentences: 1. We carried on a conversation 2. We carried on WITH a conversation Are both correct? Is there a difference in meaning? Thanks YoozeeRead More...
I really appreciate your response Gustavo. As new grammar challenges arise I will try to find the explanation through my own research. However, it is comforting to know I can seek help from experts if I am still unsure. Best wishes and I will be back 😀Read More...
Last Reply By Yoozee · First Unread Post

Reply by terry

Thank you both for your responses. The situation is that the speaker and the addressee both know that Helen passed away. I was comparing...

Reply by des3

I would take a guess and say 1. Reason is because 2. also refers to the fact that Helen was your auntie and therefore 'was' may be more ...

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Terry, I think both can be used depending on the context and the situation. If the speaker and the addressee know that Helen died, I...
ahmed_btm

Reply by Abdul Rahman

Thanks, mates. I really needed the editors' answer not just the non-native members'. Anyway, I know that we can use "went" or "had gone"

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, CP1612, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange, The use of 'Were it that' is just very archaic. I don't know the whole context, but the...
ahmed_btm

"Were it" question

Wondering if the current usage of 'were it' is acceptable: Were it that the waters were not calm, so that she might at least be pushed in some other direction! I understand that it would make more sense to the modern audience to use 'If only' rather than 'were it', but the atmosphere I am going for is a more old-fashioned one. Any suggestions? Thanks in advance to any who decide to reply to this.Read More...
Hi, CP1612, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange, The use of 'Were it that' is just very archaic. I don't know the whole context, but the usage of 'If only' seems better here. You could say something like "Oh, God! If only the waters were not ...."Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Modal verbs

Sentence: The millionaire has a very ugly girl who I <may/can/could/would> not have dreamed many boys fell in love with. If I want to express it with the fact that: many men actually love her, from a grammar standpoint, which modal verb is possible? Many thanks in advance.Read More...
I forgot to mention that, as it introduces a restrictive clause, "who" would be normally dropped: - The millionaire has a very ugly girl I would not have dreamed so many boys could fall in love with.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

present simple or continuous

What's the difference between: Do you speak when you're riding a bike? and Do you speak when you ride a bike?Read More...

Causative verb + Ajd/Adv?

Hello. I sometimes see structures like this > He *has you sad*. > He dreamed he *had his pants down* in front of everyone I would like to know: 1. Are these sentences the passive causative or active ones? 2. What is the meaning they're conveing?Read More...
Hi, Harry O'Neil, The passive causative is formed by "have" + object + past participle: - He had his pants taken down (= lengthened). (Somebody took them down for him.) The active causative is formed by "have" + object + bare infinitive: - He had a tailor take down (= lengthen) his pants. (A tailor took them down for him.) I don't think "have" has a causative meaning in the sentences above, if we understand that "causative" means making somebody do something for you, or getting somebody to...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Abu Hamza, Both are correct, but 'makes' seems more common. Generally speaking, the singular verb is particularly preferred in...
ahmed_btm

Reply by Hussein Hassan

I remember the following answer when I asked a native speaker the same question. He said, "Both the singular and the plural verb are...
Hussein Hassan

Implied subject of a -ing clause

This course is of great interest to students, _____ to improve their writing skills. A. hope B. to hope C. hoping D. hoped Hello everyone. The answer to that question is C, but I want to know who's hoping? This course? If it is the "students", wouldn't a restrictive modifier be better? Thanks in advance.Read More...
I get it, thanks, Gustavo.Read More...
Last Reply By Robby zhu · First Unread Post

Passed away - tense

1 Was Helen your auntie, a blood relative? 2 Is Helen your auntie, a blood relative? Helen passed away. Is 2 correct because although Helen passed away, it refers to the relationship which is a fact?Read More...
Thank you both for your responses. The situation is that the speaker and the addressee both know that Helen passed away. I was comparing to the case: Richard is an ex-colleague. Maybe it is different because the word “ex-colleague” itself bears the meaning which reflects the relationship in the past. But we still use present tense. David: Richard was a teacher of King’s College. David: Richard is an ex-colleague of mine. Both David and Richard are live and kicking. Richard is no longer...Read More...
Last Reply By terry · First Unread Post

Archive download

ceedhanna
Hello I miss you so much. Stay safe. I have a suggestion. Could forum archives be downloadable? Thank you.Read More...

Question about introducing quotations...

Hi there, I'm writing a children's book and have a question about a particular construction. Here's the sentence in question: Mr. Owl spoke again, “I know that the Night seems very dark to your eyes, but you have to trust my words more than you trust your eyes. Day will come again. Do you believe that?” Note that the comma before the quotation is essentially filling in for the word "saying," as in "Mr. Owl spoke again, saying, "......". My question is this: can I write this as I have above,...Read More...
Wonderful! Thank you very much.Read More...
Last Reply By Christopher · First Unread Post

unless

Hello. I can't decide which one of the following sentences is correct and which one is not and why. Please help. Thank you 1- I wouldn't have the first prize unless I trained hard. 2- Unless you had studied hard, you wouldn't have got high marks. 3- Gamila wouldn't have bought the new car unless she had saved money. 4- I wouldn't have been able to do it unless she had helped me. 5- Unless you had told me about Rasha's new dress, I wouldn't have noticed it. 6- Unless my sister had been born,...Read More...

The amount of the work (article usage)

Hello! I hope you're doing well. Would you, please, check my understanding of article usage in 'amount of something' ? Here are my examples and reasoning: Context 1: Our man has been building a house for three days = It's the entire amount of work. a) It's hard to estimate [the amount of work] [he did yesterday]. b) It's hard to estimate [the amount of] [work he did yesterday]. c) It's hard to estimate [the amount of the work] [he did yesterday]. d) It's hard to estimate [the amount of] [the...Read More...

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, akcpenguin, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. To add a little to Gustavo's response, with which I completely agree, I think it...
David, Moderator

Reply by AmitD

Thank you kindly! My head was hurting with the question: "What would you have done?" Does the person mean ...if you had been in my...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, bananas, I see nothing grammatically wrong with your sentence. Perhaps it could be improved to: - His high level of commitment to...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Apart from the quantifiers David proposed, here are the adjectives suggested by the Oxford Collocations Dictionary for Students of...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Abdul Rahman and welcome to the G.E, The first answer with 'had gone' is the better one here because it reflects the usage of 'go'...
ahmed_btm

Reply by Rodrigo_Berne

Considering your examples, you could say both. In this case, both verbs have a close meaning. If you want to be more specific about the...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

That's perfect. I'm afraid I didn't make myself clear enough. It doesn't matter whether the subject is I, you, he, she, we or they. My...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Me, myself, and I

Thanks for your welcome to GE and for sharing your thoughts on my question, Gustavo I chose my name because it seemed like a fun ID that...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hello, akcpenguin, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. Both and are correct. The difference is, just as you seem to have guessed, that...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hello, Me, myself, and I (is that the username you really intended to adopt or did you just get confused with the title of your...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, David and Gustavo, David, you are really such a nice and thoughtful man! I do wish everybody here to stay safe and healthy. One...
ahmed_btm

Reported speech {go}

Hello, sir! I'd like to know how to report this sentence "Did you go to school?", mother said. Is it OK to say: Mother asked if I had gone to school. Or, Mother asked if I had been to school.Read More...
Hello, sir. I really appreciate every help from anyone. However, I resorted to this site for its "native" experts. We resort to this site as a trustworthy one as we, second language learners, may argue about some kind of a rule. * Concerning the use of "had gone", not "went", I learnt that the past simple tense can be changed into past perfect or it can be kept unchanged. Thanks, allRead More...
Last Reply By Abdul Rahman · First Unread Post
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