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generic you in the object of a verb in the past tense

Hi! I was wondering whether generic you (used for people in general) can appear as the object of a verb in the past tense. I got this question when I was reading this article: What's your favorite place that you've played so far? "It wasn't in the United States, it was actually over in Japan when I played there in 2016. I loved playing in the city of Sapporo. The people there — the culture was pretty unique, and they embraced you."...Read More...

Reply by kuen

Hi David, I have some more questions as follows: 1. Do you mean that 'very much' doesn't mean "he truly is a loner," or "The category of...

a puzzling question

1- ..........show(s) how a living thing will develop. a) Genetic engineering b) Genes c) Cells I go for 'b'. Am I right?Read More...

Phrase Heads & Licence Complements - Reference Book

In the book "Oxford Modern English Grammar", 5.1.2 - Complements in Phrases it states: "He wasn't particularly fond of Bax" "The Head of this AdjP is the adjective fond which licences the PP..." Essentially I'm trying to determine what complements are licensed by a phrase head for other words. Many thanks, PhilipRead More...
The simplest one, thus far, is the "Australian Concise Oxford Dictionary", pg 545, listing Fond as: "fond adj. 1 (foll. by of)...Read More...
Last Reply By Philip · First Unread Post

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Kuen, No, "out-and-out" is not a natural or a good substitute for "very much" in the example I gave. "He is an out-and-out loner"...
David, Moderator

Reply by kuen

Hi David Does it sound natural to use 'out-and-out' instead of 'very much' in your example? A: Is he a loner? B: Oh, yes! He is an...

Reply by Doc V

Ahmed_btm (and to this day I still have no idea what "btm" means) wrote: My dear friend Ahmed, I believe you meant to write " whom we...

Reply by Erudite_Birdy

It may have become popular from 1975 onward due to this song. Song: My Way or Hit the Highway Artist: Jill 'Baby' Love Label: Black...
Erudite_Birdy

seems like (as if)?

Hello! 1. He seems to be happy. 2. It seems that he is happy. (formal style) 3. It seems like ( as if ) he is happy. (informal style) In sentence 2 and 3, I assume that; 1) the conjunctions - ' that ' and ' like ', ' as if' in informal style - lead not a subject complement but a real subject clause (that is, impersonal subject + complete intransitive verb + real subject clause). 2) ' seems ' is justified to function as an complete intransitive verb , which leads a real subject clause.Read More...

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: Whose
Hello, Hs12. Welcome to the Grammar Exchange and Happy Easter! Generally, "those" refers to things that come before. It would have been...
David, Moderator

Reply by ayman

@ahmed_btm , Thanks for your concern. However, you added nothing more to solve the problem. Concerning the natives' matter, I put...

A variety or number

Hello, "There are a..............of departments for the students to choose from." A- number b- variety I think (number) because of the plural verb (are).Read More...

Reply by ahmad

Hi, Gustavo, I see my folly now. Thanks a lot.
ahmad

Whose

Hi everyone First of all happy easter to everyone Are those sentences correct? I have a friend whose car we need. Or I have a friend whose car we are in need of. Thanks.Read More...
Hello, Hs12. Welcome to the Grammar Exchange and Happy Easter! Generally, "those" refers to things that come before. It would have been better to say, "Are these sentences correct?," because you are talking about sentences that you are about to mention. The example sentences you have written are very strange, but they are grammatically correct. What context do you have in mind for them? Here are more natural sentences: I have a friend whose car needs gas. I have a friend whose car is in need...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

... (he) suffered from many ....

I have made up a sentence below. (1a) He was weak and throughout his adult life suffered from many illnesses. My friends think I need "he" after "life". (1b) He was weak and throughout his adult life he suffered from many illnesses. Do I need "he" there? Thanks a lot.Read More...
Hi, Ansonman, Both (1a) and (1b) are correct. You can add "he" after "life" or not. It's your choice. The sentence is correct either way. Sentence (1a) has one independent clause, and (1b) has two. Sentence (1a) is the following sentence with the "throughout"-phrase re-positioned: (1a') He was weak and suffered from many illnesses throughout his adult life. As you can see, "throughout his adult life" is adverbial modifying the verb phrase "suffered from many illnesses." It modifies that verb...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Is it wrong to omit the conjunction "and"?

Last week, I made up three sentences for my non-native English speaking friends to comment on. I have written them below. (1a) This is an interesting, exciting story. (2a) He is a reliable, dedicated employee. (3a) The couple has a happy, healthy relationship. My friends said the sentences sound wrong without the conjunction. So, they revised them to make the sentences below. (1b) This is an interesting and exciting story. (2b) He is a reliable and dedicated employee. (3b) The couple has a...Read More...
Hi, Ansonman, Yes, all six sentences are perfectly correct. Moreover, the sentences your friends said sound wrong sound perfectly fine.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Reply by Rasha Assem

I've checked the link but there was no satisfactory explanation to the why 'a' is the correct choice. So please can anyone help me see...

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Azz, Sentence (a) can mean (2), (3), or (4). It is context that will make the difference. Sentence (b) can mean (1). For meaning...
David, Moderator

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hello, HS12, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! Your sentence: is totally ungrammatical. "than" needs to appear after the adjective in...
Gustavo, Contributor

Than whom

Hi guys. Is it correct to say : I have a friend than whom my father speaks English better as in : I have a friend who speaks English My father speaks English better than my friendRead More...
Hello, HS12, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! Your sentence: is totally ungrammatical. "than" needs to appear after the adjective in comparative degree. If you want to use a relative, you can choose one of these: - I have a friend whose English is not as good as my father's. - I have a friend who doesn't speak English as well as my father (does).Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Grammatically speaking, it is true that "if you want to be fluent in this language" refers to "should learn English words." However,...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Freeguy

Of course. Yours is much better. I would be happy if you would share your opinion about a and b.
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