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Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, Navi, I wouldn't say that "where" is incorrect but only vague. As a teacher or editor, I think I'd correct it as follows: 1) He was...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Re: Nouns
Hello, P.J., and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! In: "fit" does not work as a noun to mean what "fitting" denotes (the act of trying...
Gustavo, Contributor

play them off against one another

Is there a difference between: 1) Play them off against one another and 2) Play them against one another If yes, what is the difference? Gratefully, NaviRead More...

not where

Are these sentences correct: 1) He was supposed to write a short story, but not like this, not where one has to know a lot of history to understand what the story is about. 2) You're supposed to write a short story, but not a complicated one, not where the writer has to be an expert in history. If they are, what does 'where' refer to in them? Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Hi, Navi, I wouldn't say that "where" is incorrect but only vague. As a teacher or editor, I think I'd correct it as follows: 1) He was supposed to write a short story, but not like this, not one in which one has to know a lot of history to understand what the story is about. 2) You're supposed to write a short story, but not a complicated one, not one in which the writer has to be an expert in history. I prefer (2) because in (1) "not like this" refers to the manner, not the subject-matter...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Nouns

Hello, I’d like to know why these nouns use the -ing form instead of the simple form. I’d appreciate any help. ej. “A dress fitting” instead of “a dress fit.” “A drinking problem” instead of a “drink problem”. But, this example use the simple form: “Dance floor” instead of “dancing floor”. Thanks in advance.Read More...
Hello, P.J., and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! In: "fit" does not work as a noun to mean what "fitting" denotes (the act of trying clothes on to check whether they fit). In: "drinking" refers to the action of drinking, while "drink" refers to one particular drink or act of drinking. Just as we speak about "eating disorders" (NOT "food/meal disorders"), we speak about "drinking problem." This: is perhaps the hardest to explain and, therefore, the most idiomatic. I think it has to do with...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

New Member

Each vs both

The following sentence is from New Hello, Third Secondary, Egypt. My parents ….. have a mobile phone. a) all b) each c) every d) both The model answer is both, but I wonder if 'each' is also a possible answer. However, is it necessary to use commas if 'each' is another possible answer, i.e My parents, each, have a mobile phone? Thanks for anyone who can help me out!Read More...

done/finished doing something

I have made up an example below. (1) I have finished cleaning the room. Most of my non-native English speaking friends think my sentence is wrong. So, they revised it to make the two sentences below. (2) I am done cleaning the room. (3) I am finished cleaning the room. They have heard a lot of people say (2) and (3). I don't think they are grammatical. I could be wrong. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ (A) Is...Read More...

"within' + a preposition that is not "of"

I know 'within" means before a certain period of time has passed. I have trouble using it correctly. I have written a few examples below with it. (1) Everyone will receive a raise within five days after the management and the union reach an agreement and complete all the paperwork. (2) John asks me, " Within what period from the date of purchase do you choose canned foods that are safe to eat?" I reply, "I usually choose canned foods that expire within one year of the date of purchase." Some...Read More...
Hi, Ansonman, "within" can in fact be used with the preposition "of," as in this example from the Longman dictionary: - Within an hour of our arrival Caroline was starting to complain. Example (1) is fine to me. "of" and "from" could not be used in this case in which a clause follows. The present perfect could be used in the time clause: (1') Everyone will receive a raise within five days after the management and the union have reached an agreement and completed all the paperwork. In (2),...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

come here for three days vs come here three days

I have made up two similar sentences below. (1) Tom will come here for three days next week. (2) Tom will come here three days next week. Some of my non-native English speaking friends and I think "for three days" means three consecutive days . The second sentence without "for" means three days that are not consecutive . But, my other friends think (2) is grammatically wrong when it is missing "for". Please help me. Thank you very much for your help.Read More...

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Ahmed and Ahmed, There is no question of one not being formally correct or not as formally correct as the other. In each...
David, Moderator

Reply by Ahmed Abdelhafeez

Thank you sir I just wanted to know what the piece of the attachment explains concerning using "will" Sorry for repeating the question

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Ahmed, Please, forgive me, but I don't understand what you want to know exactly. In a previous thread, you asked a similar question:...
ahmed_btm

Reply by Ahmed Abdelhafeez

Sir, this is a piece quoted from "Practical English Grammar". Does it mean that we should use future simple not present continuous in...

Reply by tara

Thank you both very much About this that you said" If you'd like suggestions as to how to make your presentation even more elegant, send...

Reply by Doc V

David, thank you for your response, and for these specific examples, which do an excellent job of illustrating the "sense of immediacy...

Reply by David, Moderator

That makes sense to me, DocV. On the extremely rare occasions when I might be inclined to use "wanting" in the progressive, I would use...
David, Moderator

Reply by tara

I started a new thread since that thread is about stative verbs but I had questions about just "want" Sorry DocV, I really don't have...

Reply by terry

I want to have a girlfriend. Today is Valentine’s Day. I am wanting to have a girlfriend badly. Just an example. It does not really...
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