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He sat at the table (,) reading the paper.

Hi! I have a question about the presence/absence of a comma. Some type of intransitive verb may be followed by a present participle. In that case, I think a comma may or may not appear in front of the participle. I made up the following pair. (1) He sat at the table, reading the paper. (2) He sat at the table reading the paper. I am wondering about this kind of pair. Would you think the comma there is grammatically optional? Is there any semantic difference between sentences like (1) and...Read More...

[the original price] or [its original price]

(1a) I bought the computer on sale for $300. The original price was $700. (1b) I bought the computer on sale for $300. Its original price was $700. Which one sounds more natural to native speakers: "the" or "its"? Thank you very much for your time. I really appreciate your help.Read More...

[have been asking] or [have asked]

(1a) A lot of students have asked Professor Brown how to solve the most difficult physics problem in the textbook. So, he will show the solution next class. (my example) (1b) A lot of students have been asking Professor Brown how to solve the most difficult physics problem in the textbook. So, he will show the solution next class. (my friend's revision) (2a) A lot of people have been asking me how old I am. I don't want to tell them. (my example) (2b) A lot of people have asked me how old I...Read More...

[in my learning centre] or [at my learning center]

I have made up the A versions of the sentences below. (1a) Low student enrollment in my learning centre has reduced the work assigned to all tutors. (1b) Low student enrollment at my learning centre has reduced the work assigned to tutors. (my friends' version) (2a) Low student enrollment in my learning centre has reduced the work assigned to some tutors. (2b) Low student enrollment at my learning centre has reduced the work assigned to tutors. (my friends' version) My non-native English...Read More...

Reply by happyday

Thanks- hopefully this will clarify- the statement is "To partner with like-minded ministries to record Scripture in every language of...

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Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hello, BonnieHong, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. Adjectives like twofold, threefold, etc. are used before nouns or after the verb...
Gustavo, Contributor

pp as adjective

Excuse me! I will ask a common question. If he broken a cup, I want to "where is the cup"? Which of the following is OK? (1) Where is the cup?->This is very simple and clear. (2) Where is the broken cup?->This focuses on the status of the cup. (3) Where is the cup which is broken?->This is the full sentence of (2). (4) Where is the previously -broken cup?->This focuses on the action of breaking. (5) Where is the cup which was broken previously?->This is the full sentence of...Read More...

just since September

Which are correct and make sense: 1) They can't have been working on this project since September. They must have started working on it much earlier. 2) They haven't been working on this project since September. They must have started working on it much earlier. 3) They haven't worked on this project since September. They must have started working on it much earlier. Could one say ' only since September'? Or 'just since September'? Is it necessary to do so? Gratefully, NaviRead More...

Grammar

Hello, I'd like to ask which of the grammatic expression is correct between these 2 expressions. 1. "The dose of phytase in study 2 was 3-fold of the dose in study 3" 2. "The dose of phytase in study 2 was 3 folds of the dose in study 3" Thanks.Read More...
Hello, BonnieHong, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. Adjectives like twofold, threefold, etc. are used before nouns or after the verb be but are not followed by "of"-phrases. They are used to mean that there is more than one aspect or feature involved, or that something is twice, three times, etc. as big as something else. I think what you want to say is: 3. The dose of phytase in study 2 tripled the dose in study 3.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Reply by Alexey86

Well, this reading didn't occur to me. It makes sense. Thank you! What do you think about, " Men's responsibility that is demanded by...

Reply by happyday

Thank you. The statement is, (and yes, it's a sentence fragment that turns into a run-on sentence as well..ha) "To partner with...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Well, the same illogicality would apply to "pastry," if your reasoning were correct. You have to think of "mix" as the action of...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Robby zhu

Thanks, Gustavo. So from a grammar standpoint, the antecedent can only be "a food". But I kind of feel it is illogical: how can a single...

Reply by Alexey86

Of course! I missed that. What do you think of, " Men's responsibility that is demanded by this knowledge," or "Men's responsibility...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, Robby zhu, The antecedent of a relative clause in the predicate cannot be found in the subject, the only apparent exception being...
Gustavo, Contributor

The antecedent

Hello. Sentence: Pastry is a food made from flour, fat, and water that is mixed together, rolled flat, and baked in the oven. It is used, for example, for making pies. Source: https://www.collinsdictionary....onary/english/pastry Is the antecedent of this relative clause, "that is mixed together...", "pastry"?Read More...
Got it, thanks.Read More...
Last Reply By Robby zhu · First Unread Post

Need help with quotes over a long sentence

Hello everyone look at this conversation and tell me if this is the correct way to quote this conversation. If not what am i doing wrong? Thank You. ," Hello Tom are you here for the usual massage?” ,"No Marissa left me I’ve been down in the dumps ever since and really stressed out. I have migraines and pain in the neck"., " I can help you alleviate that with a Shiatsu massage. I had no idea you were single. Why don't you come back when my shift is over at ten we can have a few drinks at the...Read More...
Hello, Jacques, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. Your quotation has a number of issues. Can you correct some of these problems? run-on sentences misuse of commas misuse of quotation marks absence of paragraph breaks where paragraph breaks are needed Do you have a particular grammatical question you would like to discuss or have answered? The Grammar Exchange is not a copy-editing service.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Reply by Alexey86

I agree. But even an odd sentence can be grammatical. Let's go back to the dialog: - You've never seen one (an alien) before, have you?

Reply by ahmed_btm

I agree, however, I think that the first conditional would work better here if we say: If I stay up late tonight , I will feel tired...
ahmed_btm

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, I think "will" is also possible to indicate a highly likely result. While the present tense indicates a usual or habitual result,...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Alexey86

I understand that. My question was exactly about the reformulated phrase, " The men's responsibility that is demanded by the knowledge...

Reply by Alexey86

I meant a particular type of responsibility, the one demanded by the knowledge men have. Or it still should be "men's responsibility...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hello, Tip, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. "many" can be preceded by "the," but "plenty of" can't. - Due to the many benefits ...
Gustavo, Contributor

Using "the"

Hi everyone, I'm confused about when to use "the". Could you please explain why we should write "due to the many benefits" instead of "due to the plenty of benefits" Thank you!Read More...
Hello, Tip, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. "many" can be preceded by "the," but "plenty of" can't. - Due to the many benefits ... - Due to the numerous benefits ... but NOT: - Due to the plenty of benefits ...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

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Reply by Alexey86

I'm confused, since "by" is used in passive constructions to introduce a doer/agent in a sentence, for example, "I (a patient/receiver)...

the girl on the right's fiancé

She is the girl on the right's fiancé.Read More...
I agree with Gustavo's answer. It might help to vary the terms of the example: It is the girl on the right's dog. That sentence means that the dog is the dog belonging to the girl on the right. It is [the girl on the right]'s dog. We're seeing a phrasal possessive. The apostrophe + "s" (possessive morpheme) attaches to the entire noun phrase "the girl on the right," headed by "girl." P.S. to Abo Hamza: I changed the thread title, originally "Is this sentence correct?"Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, Ahmed, "of" is used to introduce the material : - That window is made of wood . "from" (also "out of") can be used to indicate the...
Gustavo, Contributor

Responsibility demands by men

Hello! I was watching The X-files and came across the following dialog: - You've never seen one (an alien) before, have you? It’s shocking at first. The acceptance of the idea... it’s something only children and fools believed in. But then you come to understand. - Understand what? - The responsibility that this knowledge demands by the men who have it. As I see it, the responsibility is demanded by the knowledge. Then, shouldn't it be, "The responsibility that this knowledge demands from...Read More...
I'll keep it in mind. Thank you for your help!Read More...
Last Reply By Alexey86 · First Unread Post

Reply by Marie

Sayed might also want to consult Quirk et al. "A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language", which I think can be considered as a...

Which article to place in front of a currency?

We normally put “the” in front of a currency, like “the yen is getting stronger”. But, we say “A strong yen would not harm the Japanese economy”. When to use “the” vs “a” when referring to a currency?Read More...
Thank you. I was confused as there was only one Japanese currency, the yen. I did not understand why we could use “a” in some instances.Read More...
Last Reply By PJ · First Unread Post

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Reply by David, Moderator

Indeed it is, or at least a character from the sequel to Alice in Wonderland, titled Through the Looking-Glass . Native-speaking...
David, Moderator

maybe i need a chill pill?

I recently joined an international nonprofit in public relations. One of the vision statements that is printed in most of our hardcopy and online messaging is written in a way that makes me bite my cheek every time I hear it. I brought it to the attention of my boss, who said it was done by higher-ups before she arrived and she's not doing to ruffle any feathers...I pointed out to her that a publication that printed a news release I sent changed the wording so it made grammatical sense. To...Read More...
Thanks- hopefully this will clarify- the statement is "To partner with like-minded ministries to record Scripture in every language of the world that needs it by the year 2033 and make these recordings freely available by every means possible." What do you think?Read More...
Last Reply By happyday · First Unread Post

Reply by David, Moderator

I had the same realization, Gustavo. To supplement your explanation of how "fall" can be either a verb or a noun, I'd like to share with...
David, Moderator

choose the correct answer :

Could you answer this question, please?Read More...
Hi, Abo Hamza, I agree with Ahmed_btm's answer. However, I have three comments to make: two about the thread you have started here and one about your question. The title "choose the correct answer :" is not an appropriate title for a discussion thread at the Grammar Exchange. A thread's title should relate to its content. The body of your opening post, "Could you answer this question, please?," is not appropriate either. Ask your question in the opening post, not in an attachment. The...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

I've been thinking about what may have led you to that confusion, bear_bear, and I think it's the word "fall." In those sentences "fall"...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by David, Moderator

No, bear_bear. As Gustavo explained, the apostrophe "s" is being used to express possession. It does not stand for anything; no...
David, Moderator

New Member

Reply by bear_bear

Thanks again. But I got another thing to clarify. "The actor's fall..." . What does the Apostrophe s stand for? Isn't " The actor is /...

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Zizi, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. I agree with Ahmed_btm's answer: the singular verb is needed in each case.
David, Moderator

thinking about John

1) I couldn't sleep thinking about John. 2) I couldn't sleep, thinking about John. 3) Thinking about John, I couldn't sleep. 4) I was unable to sleep thinking about John. 5) I was unable to sleep, thinking about John. 6) Thinking about John, I was unable to sleep. Do '1' and '4' mean: I couldn't sleep while I was thinking about John? Maybe I stopped thinking about him and managed to go to sleep. Do '2', '3', '5' and '5' mean: I couldn't sleep because I was thinking about John? Gratefully, NaviRead More...

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Zizi, I'd go with (1). I see that the main subject here is the singular subject 'effortless website navigation'. You can also say:...
ahmed_btm
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