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Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

I agree. I'd say that it is the inversion following "nor" that causes a break between both coordinate clauses. A comma is required...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by navi

Thank you very much, DocV, I do appreciate it, but I wasn't sure it was really there. Respectfully, Navi

Reply by Doc V

Evy, Welcome to the Grammar Exchange. The simple answer to your question is yes. If you say the sentence out loud, you should be able to...

Reply by Doc V

Bingo! As ridiculous as it sounds, I thought that that was the sort of ambiguity that you would appreciate. DocV

Reply by navi

Thank you ver much, DocV, The only other meaning meaning I can come up with for '4' is: 5) There isn't any money that is better than...

Reply by navi

Wow! It is good to have DocV around! I had completely forgotten the soundtrack album! Thank you all very much! Navi

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Shivam Raj, That word is not in any dictionary that I know of, though I don't want to discourage you from using it. Prefixes can...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

To clarify what the Longman editor meant, it is not that such sentences are ungrammatical. They are perfectly grammatical. But they are...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

I think that vindicates Navi's specimen. The prepositional phrase needn't be regarded as nonrestrictive if there is a way to read it as...
David, Moderator

Reply by Doc V

I don't really like any of your examples, Navi. For the first three, these sound better to me: 1a: Having money is better than being in...

Reply by Doc V

One minor correction, Navi. There was also an album named Quadrophenia that was released in 1979, being the soundtrack album for the...

Reply by navi

Thank you very much, DocV, I thought that '4' might mean the same as '3' as well as being a self-contradictory statement. Apparently it...

Reply by Doc V

I agree with both of you. The obvious interpretation is that someone knocked on your door while he was eating his lunch, which is not...

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Ayman, Yes, I agree. It is a clear example of what is called "a dangling participle or dangling modifier". It is quite clear that...
ahmed_btm

Reply by Hussein Hassan

Hello, Ahmed and DocV, I would think that we can use two other prepositions in context NO. 2; 2b: Many websites allow people to download...
Hussein Hassan

Reply by Doc V

Navi, (1) and (2) are both correct and mean pretty much the same thing. (3) says that it is possible to use as many as three...

Reply by Doc V

Ahmed, I'm sure I've seen this question before. Both are correct but they mean different things. (A) can mean that she does programming,...

Reply by Doc V

Ahmed, Generally we use "upload" to mean transferring from a smaller system to a larger one and "download" for larger to smaller. A...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, Navi, I don't think it's a mistake. The year when the album was launched is extra information which could have been inserted between...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, Azz, "for women to be treated equally with men" is an event, and the passive renders the first interpretation unlikely. I think the...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Poet20, "Noise" can be used as a countable noun and as an uncountable noun. In "What a weird noise!," it is countable. In "What...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Mimichan, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! Yes, "sure" is an adjective there. As for proof, what other type of word were you...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Kuen, The speaker is saying that, to him, life would be unbearable without peanut butter. "Life" refers to the burdens of life, or...
David, Moderator

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hello, Lauraaliali, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. I don't think the difference between "for" and "by" in adverbials of time...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Doc V

Sadude, Welcome to the Grammar Exchange. I can't help but wonder why this question should be so important, but I'll answer it anyway.

Reply by Shivam Raj

Thank you very much for explaining in such detail. Much appreciated.

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hello, Shivam Raj, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. Even if in speech sentence (1) is heard a lot, in written language only (2) is...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Doc V

Kuen, As the Urban Dictionary says, the person has a history of unreputable actions. Not just one action, but actions plural. They might...

Reply by Doc V

Ahmed, I agree with you, and I especially appreciate your taking the time to research Rachel's comments from years past. DocV

Reply by Doc V

Eddy, Welcome to the Grammar Exchange. Your question is more about syntax than grammar, but I'll allow it. I think that it helps to have...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Yes, Fujibei, it should be "until he was seated." The text mixes direct and indirect speech. After that clause, which being in the...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, Ruifeng, "in/of the world" does not make sense to me in (1) and (2). I'd just say: 5. He wants to become a good writer. Or perhaps...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Doc V

Jonghun, Welcome to the Grammar Exchange. I've taken the liberty of editing the subject title for the thread. Since this is a grammar...

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, CIL, 'Has' works according to American English. 'Have' works according to British English. So, both choices are correct. Generally...
ahmed_btm

Reply by Doc V

Azz, Only (1) is correct here. For the meaning to be (2), it would have to be: b: It is important that she come here. DocV

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Ahmed55, My guess is that whoever made up this sentence has just done one thing: He looked up the definition of the word...
ahmed_btm

Reply by Freeguy

I copy-pasted what we had in the exam. However, I now saw that in the original we have "them. So, without "them" the sentence is wrong,...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Freeguy, are you sure the first part of the sentence is complete? I would have said: - Cars may be stuck in heavy traffic because there...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Freeguy

Re: not to
I think I didn't fully understand the point. Do you mean the "not to" is because of the feature of the verb "make sure", and it's not...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Re: not to
Hi, Freeguy, When "make sure" is followed by a verb that refers to the same subject of "make sure," an infinitive can be used. In direct...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Navi, As a native speaker of American English, I understand "away from" as ambiguous between "before" and "after" in (1) -- I can...
David, Moderator

Reply by navi

Thank you very much, David, Very interesting. Sentence '1' strikes me as a very rare specimen. It can have two meanings. That is of...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Thank you, David, for making that clear. I think I should also clarify that "which was news to me" in end position also refers to the...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by David, Moderator

I agree with your analysis, Gustavo. Since Mengxin_2009 has indicated that he thinks the comment-clause parenthetical can only be part...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Navi, I agree with you that all three sentences can be considered informal. Even though "like" has been used as a subordinating...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Freeguy, Please number your examples the next time. All four sentences are correct. The second and third sentences are essentially...
David, Moderator
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