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Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

You need proof of something . In the text above, what the writer says is that what happened is the only proof you need of the police's ...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, Toaha, I wonder where you have taken these sentences from. The noun "police" requires the definite article. Also, when pointing out...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by David, Moderator

You've presented some good options, Ahmed. If Toaha intends the adverbial "last night" to apply to both independent clauses, those are...
David, Moderator

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Toaha, I'd say " Last night, I went to the the hospital and saw a patient in the act of being treated ." You can also say "Last...
ahmed_btm

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: choose
Helllo, Hobapop, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. Both answers are correct. Would you like to ask a question?
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Navi—Yes, (1) is ambiguous in that way. Nice observation. On reading (b), "swearing" is a gerund, i.e., a noun. (Compare: "He has...
David, Moderator

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Yes. Unlike "wanted," which can point to the future within the past ( he wanted to have a meeting/meetings ), "liked" expresses a...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Toaha—Both are incorrect. The hyphens in (1) are incorrect, and you have misspelled "through" in (2). With the misspelling...
David, Moderator

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, hero, Where have you taken this sentence from? With the verb "like" in the present or past simple we use generic nouns: Jim didn't...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Toaah, No, it isn't. You can say either 'have second thoughts' ('thoughts' here is always a plural noun) or 'on second...
ahmed_btm

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Gustavo, ِAnd who would?! I have just seen this comma and I don't know how I have inserted it. Thank you for referring to this typo.
ahmed_btm

Reply by ahmed_btm

I can't say that 'grammar' has no rule here. 'Grammar' has talked about 'any' when it means 'it doesn't matter'. Swan, page (47) says...
ahmed_btm

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Rasha, Normally 'that' is often omitted here without affecting the meaning. See: https://www.bbc.co.uk/worldser...it/learnitv105.shtml
ahmed_btm

Reply by Ivana

Thank you so much for your reply.I'm sorry I didn't make my question clearly. Actually, I'm confused with plural noun after any when the...

Reply by cwm9

I agree this makes far more sense. I do not like the dichotomy of 'simple/compound'. A child should not be greatly faulted for confusing...

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Ilko, I am afraid it is meaningless.
ahmed_btm

Reply by cwm9

Thank you. If a sentence is simple-complex, would it be acceptable to call that sentence merely 'simple' (omitting the complex part),...

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Ivana, and welcome to Grammar Exchange, You can also use 'At all events'. I don't understand this second part of your question, so I...
ahmed_btm

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Ahmed, Sometimes they are used interchangeably. 'Relating to' is a preposition meaning 'concerning' or 'about' . On LDOCE, you can...
ahmed_btm

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hello, KDog, The subjunctive "be" can be used in front position, followed by a noun or a pronoun in subject case (e.g. they ), to...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Ahmed, See David's answer here: https://thegrammarexchange.inf...c/topic/each-vs-both
ahmed_btm

Reply by Mrchuffie

Thank you. If I use The Players List then is it simply a matter that players is functioning as an adjective to describe what type of...

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Gopal—Both are OK; however, there is a difference in meaning. With "was," the thing noticed (his being alone or not) was...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Ahmed—As to the general patterns, Gustavo has given you an excellent explanation of the difference between "adapt himself to be...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Toaha—In what context did you encounter the expression "regulation hottie"? Definitions can easily be found on Google. It appears to...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Yes, the sentence "It is the first time I have seen you since you left" is correct. I would find it a little more natural with "this"...
David, Moderator

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Ilko, You had better say: "I haven't seen you since you left / your departure."
ahmed_btm

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, mo7amed, Both are possible, however, in our exams, we go with 'will' because 'tomorrow' isn't changed. For more information, see:...
ahmed_btm

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

After "adapt oneself to," they are completely different, as explained in my posting above. Please read it carefully to try to understand it.
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Toaha

Gustavo, what is the main difference between "to be free" and "being free"?

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Yes, both are correct. Here you can read: When since introduces an action or event at a point of time in the past, we can use the past...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Toaha

Gustavo, can I write that sentence like these ways: 1. I have saved a lot of money since I changed to generic. 2. I have saved a lot of...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hello, Ahmed towab, "adapt oneself to" is usually followed by a gerund to indicate what one adapts oneself to, for example: - Animals...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by deepcosmos

Gustavo, sincerely appreciate your explanation. However, frankly since I can't undertsand the subtle difference between Marilyn's and...

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, ilko, Its meaning is weird and it isn't well written.
ahmed_btm

Reply by deepcosmos

I learned the regulation from last thread in 2003 by Marilyn Martin; https://thegrammarexchange.inf...545778371#8326029903 I will deeply...
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