Activity

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hello, 4n4, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. (1) is fine as long as the purpose of the review is to check the web page after...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Navi, Yes, all four of those sentences are grammatical, but I think (2) and (4) would sound better with some slight adjustments:...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

I'm glad I asked you to write them as separate sentences, bear_bear, because you are making precisely the error that I thought you might...
David, Moderator

Reply by bear_bear

Sure. There are my sentences: 1 He will always play well in the competition. 2 He will always plays well in the competition. 3 She will...

Reply by David, Moderator

First of all, a tag question must relate to a certain clause. Secondly, sentences with tag questions usually have only one clause. But...
David, Moderator

Reply by jasabiza

Hi there. Thanks for your kind reply. First of all I don't know why my questions were considered as speculative and as you mentioned as...

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Yasukotta, Unfortunately, that paraphrase does not work. What your attempt to use (3) as a paraphrase of (1) tells me is that you...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

I support Ahmed_btm's answer. In writing, a tag question will almost always relate to the main clause. In conversation, however, the tag...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, bear_bear, Please write two separate sentences, each labeled with a number or letter. The slash does not sufficiently indicate...
David, Moderator

Reply by yasukotta

Thank you so much, David! Is it possible to paraphrase (1) to (3) below? (3) To update/Updating your resume is past time. I'm just...

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Jasabiza, and welcome to the G.E. In all your three questions, I see that the basic rule is to know that the question tag is...
ahmed_btm

Reply by oabootty

According to AS Hornby, who first compiled the famouse Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary , it is wrong to say “ I am going to temple”...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Having read your new post, realizing you need some more help , I'm going to give you an additional answer. How do you find the two...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by ahmad

Hi, Gustavo, Thanks a lot for the reply. However, I need a little more on 'such juxtaposition is not allowed', besides needing help to...
ahmad

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, Ahmad, In this case, I wouldn't refer to the sentences as being correct or incorrect, but as being good or bad. (6) is, by far, the...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Yasukotta, The structure "It is past time to [infinitive clause]" is a variation of "It is time to [infinitive clause]." It is not a...
David, Moderator

Reply by apple

Thank you, David and Gustavo, for the interesting discussion. Since I'm more used to American English than British English, it was a...

Reply by ahmad

Re: Refer
Gustavo, I have always used refer that way; however, the abundant abuse of the expression (with to skipped over) by people around me...
ahmad

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Re: Refer
"to" will appear sooner or later, for example: - My doctor referred me to a dermatologist. - The specialist referred me back to the...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by ahmad

Re: Refer
Thanks, Gustavo, Can we use refer without to or any other preposition and still be grammatically correct?
ahmad

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, Abo Hamza, The correct option is "although" for two reasons: semantic and syntactic. Semantically, you need to express contrast: the...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Highstream, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! Yes, it is grammatically acceptable to use "myself" as you have. Reflexive...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Moon, I'm afraid that "emotional" and "abusive" are never synonymous. Have you looked the words up in a dictionary? The sentence...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Markus, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! "Coming" is spelled with only one "m." I recommend the following question for that...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: Who
Hi, Catchan, Your initial assumption was natural. You assumed that the antecedent of "who" (i.e., what "who" refers to) was the noun...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Kis, Neither sentence is good, but (b) is much worse than (a), because it makes no sense. However, if you added "for" between "be"...
David, Moderator

Reply by ahmad

Hi, David, I am sincerely thankful to you for having pointed out, and subsequently rendered correct, so many mistakes in the maiden post...
ahmad

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Ahmad, No, neither is grammatically correct. First, each misuses the verb "inform." You can't inform people to do something . You...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Yale Wale, I agree with Gustavo's explanation and revision. Notice that he has changed "introduced me to," not to "introduce me to,"...
David, Moderator

Reply by Yale Wale

Wow! Thanks so much, Gustavo [ edited by moderator ]. This website is more than helpful! Thank you once again.

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, Yale Wale, Rather than a verb in the present, what is required there for the sake of parallelism is an infinitive : - Having a...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hello, Helithos, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! I'd like to have our moderator's opinion about this issue, but I'll give you my...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hello, Leonard-Jones, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! "should" only adds some improbability to Type 1 conditionals. You can...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by ahmad

Re: Set
Thanks again, Gustavo.
ahmad

Reply by ahmad

Re: Ready
Thanks, Gustavo.
ahmad

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Re: Set
Hi, Ahmad, In this context, "fixing" refers to the action of setting or establishing a certain date for something to take place.
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Re: Ready
Hi, Ahmad, The adjective "ready" is always followed by "to"-infinitive, or by "for" + noun. Therefore, only (1) is correct, provided...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by ahmad

Re: Whose
Thanks a lot, David and Gustavo.
ahmad

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Re: Whose
Actually, David, that phrase seems to be the literal translation of a definition in Latin: Source: As a legal translator, I'd definitely...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: Whose
Hello, Ahmad, Since the head of noun of the subject NP in your question is "type," which is singular, the verb should be singular, too:...
David, Moderator

Reply by joshua

Noted, thanks for the clarification. Capt (Rtd) Joshua Loo

Reply by ahmad

Hi, Gustavo, I get you in to to, but I need to go a bit ahead still. 6. This is to submit for your information that the report is...
ahmad

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

No, Ahmad. "it" cannot introduce a subject in extraposition in that sentence because it would be ungrammatical and nonsensical to say: *...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hello, Joshua, "about" and "of" are frequently interchangeable when they introduce the subject-matter. However, "of" is preferred when...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by ahmad

Hi, David, Is there a chance to read 'it' in '1' as introductory it ? If that is not so, then kindly explain with an example what you...
ahmad

Reply by ahmad

Re: State
Thanks, David, It is really helpful. PS: Additional thanks for writing a 59-word long sentence. It comes so close to my idea of writing...
ahmad

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: State
Well, Ahmad, think of legal documents. When we wish to state or represent a matter fully, and to take into account all possible (or all...
David, Moderator

Reply by ahmad

Re: State
Hi, David, I have a limited access to (what now appears to have in itself been rendered limited in scope over time) Oxford English...
ahmad

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: State
Hello, Ahmad, What edition of the OED are you looking at? The most current edition is the one online, to which I pay to have access, and...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Prashobhini. Welcome back! How many years has it been? It is correct to say "No, I don't like it" in response to "You don't like...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

I agree with Gustavo that the sentence is much better with "to" included ("A strange letter was sent to me", not "A strange letter was...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: where.
Hi, Coco and Gustavo, Even though heaven as a theological concept goes beyond the scope of this forum, "heaven" is also used...
David, Moderator

Reply by Panurge

Re: people
Thanks. And you are right. Not only is my keyboard malfunctioning, but two confusing events occurred while I was trying to do a simple...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Re: people
Hello, Panurge, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. I think you meant you write your comment in connection with some thread and instead...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Re: where.
Hi, Coco, I prefer (1) because I'm not sure that "heaven" can be defined as a physical place. In theology, it tends to be defined as a...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by apple

Thank you, David. So, oftentimes should be spelled as one word. I now understand the mysterious "the" in my second sentence. apple

Reply by David, Moderator

The problem with using "it" to refer back to the proposition expressed by the entire independent clause "The government has decided to...
David, Moderator

Reply by subhajit123

It, this and that in paragraphs - English Grammar Today - Cambridge Dictionary this site says that both it and this can be used to refer...

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Apple, "Oftentimes" (one word now, not two) is an adverb meaning "frequently" here. The OED's definition, with quotations, is below:...
David, Moderator

Reply by subhajit123

Hi David, here is another example. Could you please tell me which one I should use: it or this ? - The government has planted one...

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Subhajit, The sentence will be ambiguous no matter which one you choose. It's unclear whether the sentence is supposed to mean "Is...
David, Moderator

Reply by Emonhenn

I'm a beginner of English grammar learning.I'm indeed confusing about the alternative sentence you propose that "We are sorry for the...
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