Activity

Reply by apple

Thank you, David, for your reply, but I still don't understand. I used to think "the" means something specific, therefore, the...

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: Cost
Hi, Egyptian2017, Both answers are correct, but they have different meanings. With "cost," the sentence means: "My brother asked, 'How...
David, Moderator

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Well, they sound better to me than (1), but I perceive some unbalance: we are excluding only some of his paintings but all of others,...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by navi

Thank you very much, Gustavo, I see your point. I find your suggested sentences very sound. I'd like to know what you think of these:...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, Navi, As you know, "let alone" only works when the first part of the sentence contains some negative meaning, so "let alone" is used...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by navi

Thank you both very much, There's nothing to unveil. I saw a sentence like '1' somewhere on the net. It looked wrong to me, hence the...

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Navi, I agree with DocV that (4) is the only sentence of the bunch that works. "Let alone" doesn't work in the first three...
David, Moderator

Reply by Doc V

You are very welcome, Tara. I was afraid that I had personally offended you. If I ever do offend you, please tell me. You have my e-mail...

Reply by Rasha Assem

Doc V Thanks for your kind reply. I really appreciate the help I get from each and every admin or member here on this forum.

Reply by Linda Abraham

Hello, Gustavo, thank you and I am very excited to have joined the Grammar Exchange. The preceding text of the sentence I quoted says:...
Linda Abraham

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Apple, This is certainly one of the more interesting questions I've seen about article usage, and the context is great. If you...
David, Moderator

Reply by Doc V

Mr Bakr, The primary difference is that "both" can only refer to a quantity of two. 1a: I have two bicycles, and both of them need major...

Reply by Doc V

Rasha, I completely agree with David's answer. As to your other question, we always appreciate you citing your source, and your...

Reply by Former Member

Re: when
Thank you sooo much ! ! ! ! !

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Rasha, Here is the sentence with answer (b): (b) There are times when you can't work hard enough to live comfortably. That sentence...
David, Moderator

Reply by Doc V

I would prefer to say: 1: It's been five years since I've seen that movie. Guy, your example with such a short time span doesn't work...

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: when
Hi, Tara, "When" is a subordinating conjunction. It is used to introduce subordinate clauses. Clauses have subject phrases and verb...
David, Moderator

Reply by Former Member

Re: when
How should we know "when" refers to something durative or not?

Reply by Rasha Assem

Thanks for the clear explanation. I've got two more questions, please. 1- What does the sentence with (b) as an answer mean? 2- If 'too'...

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: when
Yes, Tara, it can mean that. But it doesn't have to mean that. There is no rule that "when" can't refer to something durative when the...
David, Moderator

Reply by Former Member

Re: when
Thank you so much ! ! ! ! Can't (4) mean when I start to writ it or we I'm going to write it not the whole time that I'm writing since...

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: when
Hi, Tara, Sentence (3) is ungrammatical, but I believe you made a typo. I think you meant to type "I" between "when" and "write": (3') I...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Rasha, Those two sentences can be used interchangeably, but it is possible for (1) to be used with a different meaning from (2).
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Rasha, Answer (d) is not wrong. It is a better answer than (b), though both answers are grammatical. Answer (d), however, is the...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Rasha, Yes, "of" renders "quality" a wrong answer. The only answer there is "quantity": Parents should spend some quantity of...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Gustavo has elaborated on the point beautifully. Thank you, Gustavo! I really like the quotations you gave from the book by Michael...
David, Moderator

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Yes, that example in particular is more natural than "I think I'll be sick," which I don't think a native speaker would normally say.
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Freeguy

I can cite an example from Oxford Grammar Practice: Oh, no. I think I am going to be sick. (prediction based on current feeling.)

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, Freeguy, In his book "First Certificate Language Practice," Michael Vince says: My impression is that, if placed at the end of the...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Freeguy

If "I expect" appeared at the front of the sentence ("I expect he will win the match tomorrow"), I would join you in preferring "will."...

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Benhui, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! In your question, you need "do"-support. In English, we say, " Why does the above...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Freeguy, The "I expect" certainly makes "will" justifiable. (Without "I expect," "He will win the match tomorrow" would sound...
David, Moderator

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Freeguy, I agree with you. Using 'expect' indicates that it is just a mere prediction. Here, I also agree with you. Using 'That's...
ahmed_btm

Reply by Freeguy

Here is another one: A: What do you want to be when you grow up, Stevie? B: _____ a scientist. That's what I want to do, anyway. 1) I...

Reply by David, Moderator

And in abstract metaphorical usage, the following transitive case is common: (5) He needed to clear up the misunderstanding. Often such...
David, Moderator

Reply by Doc V

4: The sky is cloudy this morning, but we expect it to clear up this afternoon. DocV

Reply by bear_bear

Thanks, but could you give me some examples for the phrasal verb -clear up? How do we use it?

Reply by Doc V

Bear_bear, I don't like "clear up" in any of your examples. In (1), I could go with either "clean up" or "tidy up". 1a: I'm going to...

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Silverchalk, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! Yes, you are correct. The relative pronoun is functioning as the subject of the...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: Write
No, Ahmad, it is not even remotely grammatical. It is 100% grammatically incorrect.
David, Moderator

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Re: There
Hi, Ahmad, In that position, "there" is an adverb of place. "visit" is a transitive verb and, as such, requires a noun or a pronoun as a...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by ahmad

Re: Write
Hi, David, I hope the following is grammatically correct at least? 1'. Mr. Brown was written a long letter to.
ahmad

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Mr. Abudllah Mahrouse, Grammatically speaking, sentence (C) is grammatically correct because, as you know, when we report questions...
ahmed_btm

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Re: Write
I agree. I seem to have another edition of the same book, and nothing is said about the verb "write" not taking the indirect object as...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: Write
Hello, Ahmad, Unfortunately, your sentence (1) is totally ungrammatical . But you could say: (1a) Mr. Brown was written to by the...
David, Moderator

Reply by apple

Re: and or
Ah,,,thank you, David. I got it. Apple
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