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Reply by terry

In Cantonese, we call it “hire a gun” transliterally to mean that a third party is being asked or engaged to do examinations or to write...

Reply by terry

Is your friend a Chinese or someone from Hong Kong, Macao or Guangzhou?

Reply by David, Moderator

All four sentences (word orders) sound perfectly natural to me, Ansonman. You could even experiment with putting some of those phrases...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Emad, I believe DocV is poking fun at the option "sounded" because normal dresses don't emit sound and thus do not sound a...
David, Moderator

Reply by Doc V

Ansonman, I have spoken English all my life (or at least since I was a few weeks old) and I have never heard this phrase before. Since...

Reply by ansonman

Your clear explanation has helped me understand how to construct these sentences better. Thank you very much.

Reply by egyptian2017

Re: Must
Thanks for clarification , I would like to state that these questions are from a test.

Reply by Doc V

Really? What is the source of this question? Please send us a picture of what the dress looks like and a recording of what it sounds...

Reply by Doc V

Hope, First of all, thanks for citing your source. This enabled me to find a number of excerpts from the novel online, including the...

Reply by Doc V

Re: Must
Egyptian2017, I join David in supporting Ahmed's recommendations, and I also agree with him that these aren't the only possible answers.

Reply by egyptian2017

Re: Must
thank thanks my dear for your help I agree with you that in number ( 1 ) "need to " is preferred , but " needn't" is also possible if we...

Reply by Doc V

I agree with David's comments. In particular, David's point was the unstated reason behind my rejection of (a), and I suspect it was...

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Azz, I'd just like to add one small thing to what Gustavo and DocV have said above, and that is that (a) would work if you chopped...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

I like that, DocV. "How do you get there?" could of course be used as an inquiry into mode of transportation, as well, but "How do you...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: Must
Hello, Egyptian2017 and Ahmed, I support your recommendations, Ahmed. "Need to" works in (1) ("I really need to visit my grandmother in...
David, Moderator

Reply by ahmed_btm

Re: Must
Hi, Egyptian 2017 (Time passes quickly ), I would go with: 'need to'. It means it is important for me to visit ..... BTW, 'needn't'...
ahmed_btm

Reply by Doc V

Ansonman, There is considerable potential for overlap in meaning between the two sentences, but generally speaking, I would tend to...

Reply by Doc V

Subha, I like (4) better than (3). There are so many things wrong with (1) and (2) that I'm not even going to begin to talk about them. DocV

Reply by Doc V

Wemcho, I think that with a present tense verb in the first sentence, as you have in (#8), I would want to see either a future tense...

Reply by Doc V

Azz, I think you mean to say either: e: All criminals are uncooperative witnesses, aren't they? or: f: Every criminal is an...

Reply by azz

Thank you both so much. Every criminal is an uncooperative witness, aren't they? I like the way Gustavo's imagination works. Many thanks.

Reply by Wemcho

#7 It was five o'clock. Sooner or later Peter would have finished his homework. #8 It is five o'clock now. Sooner or later Peter would...

Reply by Doc V

This is an interesting question. My take on it is that, yes, (#5) is grammatical, but rather than uncertainty, as you suggest, "would...

Reply by tara

Sorry DocV, I just wanted to test whether we can send an empty post or not. Then I deleted the empty post. I was not offended at all. I...

Reply by Wemcho

Thank you guys. You are doing a fantastic job helping the English learners. As to the tricky 'will, would, will have, would have', I...

Reply by Doc V

I am in complete agreement with David here. The indicative "has" and the subjunctive "have" both work, and the choice of which to use...

Reply by Doc V

Tara, I got a notification that you had responded to my post, but it doesn't show that you wrote anything, and when I look on the forum...

Reply by ahmad

Gustavo, thanks a lot for your help. DocV, it is great to hear from you. During my unfortunate absence, I immensely missed the...
ahmad

Reply by ahmad

Re: In/of
Thanks, Gustavo. It really helped.
ahmad

Reply by Doc V

Ahmad, I am essentially in agreement with Gustavo here. (B) does not work at all for me. Although, strictly speaking, I don't find (A)...

Reply by Doc V

Azz, You start out with a statement: Then, immediately, you give three responses, all of which, by the presence of the introductory "No,...

Reply by Doc V

That's a fair question. As with many such expressions, many speakers don't really think about the literal meaning of the words they're...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Thank you very much, David, for sharing that quote. It's an extraordinary coincidence that you should have found that text. Personally,...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by David, Moderator

That sounds right to me, Gustavo. I wanted to share a sentence I came upon yesterday that relates to our topic here, a rare instance of...
David, Moderator

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, Azz, I don't think (a) and (c) work ((c) would only work if we just had: Three people didn't witness the murder , which is to be...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Freeguy

No, not really, Why do many native speakers think they are the same? They told me: In English, their ordinary, literary meanings are...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Re: In/of
Hi, Ahmad, When "traffic" has the meaning you mentioned, it takes the preposition in , as can be seen in the section of the Oxford...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hello, Ahmad, When it means "give" or "grant," accord (which is a formal verb) follows this pattern: accord something to...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by ahmad

Re: Intend
Thanks a lot, David. I have been unbelievably busy for last few months, which is why I replied so late.
ahmad

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Hussein, You need "where" there: It's the town where everyone wants to go. To use "which" (or "that" or nothing), you would need to...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

I stand with DocV on this point. In general, style guides and academic punctuation conventions are in agreement that book titles should...
David, Moderator

Reply by Doc V

Terry, I agree with David, but I'm tempted to take his points a step or two further. Where David says: I would say that italics are...

Reply by Doc V

In the movie 40 Carats (1973), Liv Ullman's character Ann finds herself in love with a much younger man, Peter, portrayed by Edward...

Reply by Doc V

Freeguy, If you expected it to take an hour, then (A) means it took four hours and (B) means it took three hours. Can you see why? DocV

Reply by Doc V

I do sincerely hope that my recipe was not the cause of your indigestion, my friend. I am truly sorry if this was the case. I recommend...

Reply by Doc V

Re: Timing
Or even: The project will be completed within five years' time. DocV

Reply by Doc V

Thank you, Tara. I actually meant pictures of how the new dress looks on you. But since it's an exercise, I suppose there isn't really a...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Re: Timing
Another option I also find to be highly idiomatic: The project will be carried out in the span of five years .
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Thank you so much, David. This compliment of yours is the best medicine for my recent indigestion from spaghetti and meatballs. Thank...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by David, Moderator

Kis's question about subject-verb agreement here is undeniably difficult, and I like how you've treated it above, Gustavo. I was reading...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello again, Terry: In the absence of context, I can't say that I prefer any of them to the others. I might use any one of the sentences...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: Save
Hello, Emad, "Save" is the better answer, of course. "Do their power" is meaningless. The sentence is a bit awkward. Here is a better...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: Timing
Hello, Emad, The answer is "space"; however, "a" should be changed to "the": The project will be carried out in the space of five years...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

I agree with Hussein that "hard" is the better answer, and I agree with Mr. P that both are correct. Either way, the sentence appears to...
David, Moderator

Reply by Hussein Hassan

I would think that the sentence has an exclamtion point he'd like to refer to (related to the physical exertion he made), so I'd go only...
Hussein Hassan

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, Kis, According to grammar rules, "where they came from and why they disappeared" is a compound subject and should take a plural...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Hasib Rahman, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! We're happy to have you with us. In the future, when you ask a grammar...
David, Moderator

Reply by terry

Thank you! Your explanation is very clear! which one is your preference?

Reply by tara

Thank you DocV But since this is an exercise it doesn't have any context.

Reply by Doc V

Navi, I'm kind of OK with (2). To me, the use of "than" in (1) demands a more obvious comparative: 1a: There are better books about...

Reply by Doc V

Tara, Your example (1) seems a little strange to me. The first sentence in the example suggests that the painting is either currently in...

Reply by Wemcho

The #3 example is an altered version from: https://dictionary.cambridge.o...ionary/english/would It's very confusing to use 'That would...

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Terry, All three sentences are correct, but the punctuation of (1) needs improvement. Placing the "in"-phrase right after the...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Freeguy -- I am not happy with them, either. Yes, they should, at least from the standpoint of idiomaticity. "Of the book" is...
David, Moderator

Reply by Wemcho

#1. I would, if i didn't have another appointment. Does it mean 'I have another appointment, so I can't come'? #2. I would, if you had...

Reply by Doc V

I agree with Gustavo's preferences. However, Navi, I think that all of your examples are a little awkward, and would benefit by...

Reply by tara

Thanks a lot Is the first one about "future habit" but the second about "present habit"? What is the difference please?

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, William, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! In each case, you're not dealing with a sentence but with a gerund or participial...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Navi: Yes, they certainly could. I think that interpretation works, Navi. I still have a slight preference for (3), however, to...
David, Moderator
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