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Reply by David, Moderator

Yes, you are right, Coco. Very good. The answer is (a): It was only ten days ago that she started her new job. ( comes from : She...
David, Moderator

Reply by cocoricot

Hello, Please let me try to answer. I think it is (a). It is a cleft sentence.
cocoricot

Reply by David, Moderator

In order to get it to flow better, Better Flow, I need to break out of the two-choice box you've given me (I don't like either choice)...
David, Moderator

Reply by Better Flow

Hello David, whenever you find the time - do you have an advice how to put it in this case ? Would "break out of a system of corruption"...

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Sharon, Since you are clear that you you don't wish the phrase to indicate that the serious belongs to the speakers, I agree with...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Azz, While none of the sentences is a disaster, all of them cry out to be repaired. If you changed "(in order) to repair the bus" to...
David, Moderator

Reply by Better Flow

Hello David, thank you for your expertise! I mean a system of corruption and exploitation within a state. Breaking out would mean...

Reply by apple

Thank you, David. I also thought "onto" would have been better, but since it is in Oxford dictionary, I wasn't sure of myself. Apple

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, C.Y.Chang, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! Only (a) is correct. The reason you shouldn't say "a hotel where you've visited"...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Azz, No, the sentence in blue does not work in that context. It means that, while drunk at the party, he couldn't remember something...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Apple, "Onto" generally indicates motion of one thing onto another. For example, "He jumped onto the hood of the car." Because the...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Apple, Yes, all four of those sentences are correct. Sentence (5) is correct, too. "Trust" does not need to be replaced with...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Apple, The only incorrect sentence in your example set is (1). "Like this" doesn't work there; however, if you changed "like" to...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Coco, The key to using the correlative conjunction "not only . . . but also . . ." mid-sentence is to make sure that the phrase...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Better Flow, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! As a native speaker, I do not hear "break out from" as prepositional verb, like...
David, Moderator

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Favor, I can't believe you don't remember that you asked and I answered exactly the same question only ten days ago! Please do me the...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by kuen

Hi David, Could you please explain why it's better to use 'to be giving' instead of 'to give'? Thanks.

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hello, Joanna, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! A conditional sentence is a sentence formed by a main clause (what we call the...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Subhajit: Sentence (1) is extremely awkward. I can't imagine any native speaker anywhere using the sentence. It wouldn't work at all...
David, Moderator

Reply by Yale Wale

Wonderful! I am so grateful to you, Mr David. Your responses are always excellent.

Reply by David Irwell

Admittedly wildly late to this conversation, but while I agree with others on the "decades-long" issue, I disagree that the verb be was...

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: Admit
Greetings, everybody, I agree with your answer, Ahmed_btm, though I can't say I find the "model answer" to be the most natural here. I...
David, Moderator

Reply by Hussein Hassan

Re: Admit
I still remember David's words: "You will NOT find everything in anything."
Hussein Hassan

Reply by ahmed_btm

Re: Admit
Hi, Mr President, Strictly speaking, both answers 'breaking' and 'to breaking' are grammatically correct. In fact, I have seen more than...
ahmed_btm

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Ramdan, welcome to the G.E. and Happy Ramadan, Both are correct. The first one is ambiguous as it could refer to either the...
ahmed_btm

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Poet20, "On" is a preposition. It is not a subordinating conjunction, like "while." Prepositions do not introduce subordinate clauses.
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: Please
Hello, Yama, No, it can't. No. Only the first sentence works. The second is ungrammatical. But you can say: 1a) I begged/asked him to...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Freeguy, Yes, "hiding under the bed" may be analyzed either way in that sentence. According to the adjectival interpretation, the...
David, Moderator

Reply by Doc V

Interesting. I'm sure you're right, David, that these are standard grocery items, and that I have seen them, but I've never noticed...

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Yale Wale, Sorry for the delay. All three of those sentences are correct. Here is the last example you quoted from CGE: The...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Dear Coco, There is no reason for you to feel sorry or embarrassed that you asked what is essentially the same question twice. It is an...
David, Moderator

Reply by Doc V

Sorry for this late response. I'm trying to catch up after a prolonged absence from the forum. I find this subject somewhat amusing.

Reply by cocoricot

Dear David and Gustavo. Please forgive me for my absent-mindedness. At first, I was right when I thought that ''the matter'' was a...
cocoricot

Reply by David, Moderator

Right you are, Navi. I did mean 'meaning (a).' Sorry about that. I've just edited that comment, notating that I edited it. Sometimes I...
David, Moderator

Reply by navi

Thank you very much, David, You write: If meaning (b) may be said to work with (2), I think it could only be said to work in theory.

Reply by Doc V

Navi, For what it's worth, David left out one minor point, which is that the full infinitive (to + V) and any clause that is introduced...

Reply by Doc V

Gustavo and Ahmed, thank you for your feedback. Ahmed, I will say that I like "changing" with "got" better than I like it with "had",...

Reply by ahmed_btm

Michael Swan supports Doc V's point concerning the continuous meaning. Swan says: " Have + object + infinitive can mean 'cause somebody...
ahmed_btm

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Navi, What a fascinating question. I agree with you that (3) is clear. It is quite clearly the clearest sentence of the three,...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Ahmed, Although the only grammatically correct answer is (A), the sentence "If we ban hunting whales, they won't die out" is...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Thanks for your help, Gustavo, and for linking to that four-year-old thread. I felt certain that we had discussed this issue before, but...
David, Moderator

Reply by Doc V

Azz, (a) implies that the two of you are dating. DocV

Reply by Doc V

Ahmed and Ahmed, I apologize for my prolonged absence from the forum, hence my long delay in responding to this. As a native speaker, I...

Reply by cocoricot

Thank you, Gustavo. How can I differentiate between what as a subject and what as a subject complement? They are used with the same word...
cocoricot

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

I agree with DocV that, with "changing" referring to a single action (we can't have a lawyer changing a will on an ongoing basis), (e)...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Azz, I see your point and agree with you that (d) and (e) can mean that. However, they can also be used to mean what (a), (b), and...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Thanks very much for your additions to this thread, Gustavo, especially for the link to that old thread, which is classic . The...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, bear_bear, Sentence (1) is incorrect. What are you trying to say? Are you trying to say this? (1a) Susan helped the elderly woman,...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, bear_bear, You can use (2) -- all three variations are OK -- but (1) is wrong. "Log in" is two words, though it is commonly spelled...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Kis, Both are unnatural (outside of context, at least), and only (b) is correct. Is there a reason you are making "made the Turtle...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Joshua, No, the sentence is not grammatical. Since you haven't said what "it" refers to, I don't know what the sentence means. I'll...
David, Moderator

Reply by Doc V

Yama, I agree with Ahmed. By far, the best answer would be: e: They had their lawyer change their will. But since this is not offered as...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hello, Ioannis Giakalis, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! Unfortunately, the passive forms you propose are not correct. 1: Everyone...
Gustavo, Contributor
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