Activity

Reply by cocoricot

Thank you, David, Can I omit ''long'' from the sentence without changing its meaning? They are building a two-kilometer bridge. Thanks.
cocoricot

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Coco, Only (2) is correct. In (1), the hyphen should touch the word that follows it, and there should be another hyphen between...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: and or
Hello again, Apple, No, sentence (1) means that it is not the case that Kent can speak both languages. Sentence (1) is compatible with...
David, Moderator

Reply by navi

Thank you very much, Gustavo, I have been thinking about this some more. I don't think '5' is really ambiguous. If something is...

Reply by apple

Re: and or
Thank you, David, for your reply. So, sentence (1) means Ken can speak English only, but not French and vice versa. You say Sentence (1)...

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Ruifeng, Let me begin by saying that I've never watched Seinfeld . "Can't be" would have made sense if Kramer was still in sight...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

I appreciate your effort, but it was not good enough. This is a site for discussing specific grammar questions. Each thread is devoted...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Again, you need to learn how to ask questions properly at this website.
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Please do not present us with a set of school exercises to complete for you. We don't do students' homework for them. If you are...
David, Moderator

Reply by egyptian2017

Re: Camera
Thank you so much I will shop around for cameras online as you suggested.

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: Camera
Hello, Egyptian2017, Yes, I think you are right. I am not an electronics expert, but I believe it is possible for cameras to come with...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: and or
Hi, Apple, Sentence (2) means that Kent can't speak either of the two languages; he cannot speak English, and he cannot speak French.
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Lisa, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! We're glad you decided to make a post. Yes, "sorer" can correctly be used as the...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: Future
Hi, Egyptian2017, People generally don't say things like "I think I am sick," because it is usually clear to the speaker whether or not...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Ahmad, While (1) is better than (2), I find neither sentence to be good, mainly because of "out of." And while you can say "of...
David, Moderator

Reply by fooladiAli

Maybe this sentence can state my meaning better: "Mankind inventions made us resistant to the harshness of the nature otherwise we...

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, David-James, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. Unfortunately, your presentation makes it impossible for us to decipher your...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Yama, That sentence would work in British English, in which the main verb "have" ("He has a car") functions like an auxiliary,...
David, Moderator

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi all, I agree with Ahmed_BTM (who, by the way, is doing a great job helping us to answer some questions) that both "each" and "every"...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Ahmed Abdelhafeez

Hi Emad, Hussein and Ahmed, According to English Grammar in Use "each" is used for a small group but "every" is used for a large group.

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Hussein, I agree with you, but our Teacher's Guide says that both answers are grammatically correct and that's also true.
ahmed_btm

Reply by Hussein Hassan

Hello, Emad and Ahmed, I guess "Each" works better in the context above. As far as I know, we tend to use "each" if we are thinking...
Hussein Hassan

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello again, Ahmad, Yes, I believe those two sentences are fine and express the meaning you wish them to express. I like "the...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Apple, "Be late for" and "be late to" are both correct, but they are not interchangeable. This is not to say, however, that a...
David, Moderator

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Emad, Both choices are grammatically correct.
ahmed_btm

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Subhajit, Yes, you can correctly use either "what" or "which" there. The latter will tend to communicate that the speaker is...
David, Moderator

Reply by Freeguy

What about "All of this made it expensive" instead of "That made it expensive."?

Reply by Freeguy

I tried to upload the file in a reliable site, Mediafire. Let me know if you can download it here: ...

Reply by Freeguy

The pronoun "it" refers to "the earliest printed material" and serves as a summary of the entire paragraph. Indeed, the entire point of...

Reply by ahmad

Hi, David, Your explanation is on the dot. Allow me to come to my real question. If I am directed by some edict or formal order to carry...
ahmad

Reply by ahmad

Thanks, David. I was myself less sure of the correctness of the sentence, although I failed to notice the order of words previously, but...
ahmad

Reply by ahmad

Hi, Gustavo and DocV, I got "the undersigned" part. In fact, I see it used often. But I need more on the topic. Suppose, I am in the...
ahmad

Reply by Doc V

Ahmad, I agree with Gustavo. I have only encountered "the undersigned" in formal legalese pre-written multi-purpose forms that are given...

Reply by Doc V

Freeguy, You wrote: First, thanks again for the compliment, and second, not really, but it's kind of hard to move around without...

Reply by Freeguy

Source: Basic Skills for the TOEFL iBT Great explanations. You are interested in history, aren't you? And tell me, please. Why not this...

Reply by Doc V

Freeguy wrote: Thank you for the compliment, Guy. I'll allow the question. It's close enough to grammar-related for me. I will ask you...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

And there is, of course, the phrase "let alone," which I personally find so beautiful to express the idea in question. (4) People could...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hi, Navi, (1) is ambiguous. His last role may have been as a cowboy or he may have had other roles afterwards. (2) clearly states the...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Doc V

David, you obviously posted while I was still writing my last bit, as often happens, but I don't think I've contradicted you. In fact, I...

Reply by Doc V

Thank you, Ahmed_btm, for this additional information, and for the reference to Mr Darragh's book. Of the three of us that have official...

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Ahmad, No, that sentence is not correct. One problem is that you have incorrectly reversed the quasi-coordinator "still less" (in...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Ahmad, I believe that " per ambulatory" was a misprint. The intended word, it seems to me, was " pre ambulatory. The "r" and "e"...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello again, Apple, I don't know what you mean by "use/usage of quotations," since your question is about the use of commas and periods.
David, Moderator

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, all, I have really enjoyed all these enlightening comments and I just want to focus on just few points: On the book 'A Guide to the...
ahmed_btm

Reply by Doc V

Thanks for this, Gustavo. The examples in your link show how "need" can be used as either a true modal or a normal auxiliary verb. The...

Reply by ahmad

Thanks a lot to both of you. The explanation provided by DocV is quite enlightening.
ahmad

Reply by Doc V

Amalate, This is true. When I said that both (A) and (B) were acceptable, I didn't mean to imply that they meant the exact same thing.

Reply by amalate

I also wonder if the knowledge of the speaker plays a part: Example 1: On Monday, the teacher said that there would be a test on...

Reply by apple

Thank you always, David, for your prompt and pertinent reply, but I'm pretty sure that the proof readers themselves write their...

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Apple, You're absolutely right. The sentence is a run-on sentence as it appears; there should be punctuation appropriate to marking...
David, Moderator

Reply by Freeguy

Prior to the invention of the printing press, it was very difficult to print a book. You had to carve the letters into wood, stone, or...

Reply by Freeguy

What a good resposne, DocV No. It is about the best coherence illustrated in the passage. That's why I asked for permission. I don't...

Reply by Doc V

There was a weird, uncomfortable silence. After a while, somebody coughed in the background, which led to some fidgeting and nervous...

Reply by Doc V

Thanks for the support, David. Ahmed, I would like to say one more thing in our defense, which is that most good dictionaries that are...

Reply by apple

Thank you, Gustavo, for your prompt reply. Apple

Reply by Doc V

Good job, David. As I wrote earlier, But your (B), and even more so your (C), are definitely improvements. But now that you have cleaned...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hello, Apple, You do need "a" before "minority." With "majority," you can use "a" or "the," depending on the context. What is true is...
Gustavo, Contributor
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