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Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Cocoricot, Yes, both 1 & 2 are grammatically correct. The second is the better as many people would use the hypothetical past...
ahmed_btm

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Taiman, 'Enthusiasm' is mostly followed by ' for '. Well, I see that it depends on the meaning of the sentence and knowing which...
ahmed_btm

Reply by David, Moderator

Yes, that's right. In case it's not mentioned in the historical thread Ahmed_btm has linked to, the reason "from" is not needed is that...
David, Moderator

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Abudllah, In either case, the first form, without 'from', is the better one. For more detailed information, see: ...
ahmed_btm

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Kru Mart, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! It is almost impossible to decipher the question you are trying to ask, but I'm...
David, Moderator

Reply by navi

Thank you very much, David, Point taken. My bad! I was pushing it! But isn't this a possibility Can you act as well as John? I have...

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Navi, I agree with you that (1) can have (b) and (c) as possible meanings, but I see no basis for considering (a) a possible...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Navi, I don't know if Springsteen was thinking in terms of the line's being subjected to a strict semantic analysis, but my sense...
David, Moderator

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Abdullah, How do you want us to form a question without knowing the whole dialogue?! What are they talking about? Are they talking...
ahmed_btm

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

That's a very good example, David. Thank you for your clarification. A comma would obviously also be required if the participle appeared...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by David, Moderator

I share Gustavo's preference and rationale. If I were to use that sentence, though, I would use a comma after "entered," which doesn't...
David, Moderator

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hello, Ahmed Abdelhafeez, Although not strictly incorrect, it would be very awkward for "being" to appear before "accompanied" or any...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by azz

Thank you so much David. This is very interesting. I hadn't seen the ambiguity in (a) and (c). Now I do see it! Wouldn't you say that...

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Azz, In each sentence pair, the first member is ambiguous and the second is not. Let's take the unambiguous ones first. Sentence (b)...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Subhajit, An "if"-clause is a non-assertive context (cf. negative statements and questions), so it is possible to use "dare" as a...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Freeguy, I think you meant to write "There." The natural, native choice here is "is going to be." If you use "will be" instead, the...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Abdullah, I would be much better to say: Which subject is your favorite? What is your favorite subject ? In American English,...
David, Moderator

Reply by Kimconu

Am I correct with this summary? I. Say about people: I. 1. When we say about a certain man or some certain men, we say: a This is a man...

Reply by Freeguy

1. Apparently, they refers to the people who had been described in an earlier sentence. 2. Thanks for your suggestion. What do you think...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

* These are (some) men's bag is incorrect. It should be: This is some men 's bag (a bag belonging to some men) / This is a men's bag (a...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by apple

Thank you, David. Wow! Prince of Whales!! Tweeting is sometimes dangerous, because they write and send the messages very quickly. apple

Reply by Kimconu

So when I say about a bag (or bags) of some certain men, can I say: These are some men's bag. / These are men's bag. These are some...

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, MaaAdjoa, and welcome to GE! I agree with Gustavo's answer and, like you, share his preference for (1). The hyphen after "time"...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Apple, Yes, there is. If you meet with a word a lot, there's a good chance it exists. Below are links to half a dozen dictionary...
David, Moderator

Reply by ahmed_btm

Re: If
Hi, Ahmad, Yes, it is right. If you are talking about a general fact, the zero conditional is the only right answer. A science teacher...
ahmed_btm

Reply by StillKicking

Gustavo and David, thank you for your replies. In a later email from my tech writer friend, he clarified that he agreed with me.

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: Future
Yes, I realize that you guys are looking for a detailed explanation, and I have decided to turn this into a research project. Please...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, StillKicking, and welcome to GE! I fully agree with Gustavo's answer and think he has done a nice job of clarifying the singular...
David, Moderator

Reply by Mr President

Re: Future
@David, Moderator Could you please give more explanation and more examples when both are correct?

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

I agree with David that this is an interesting topic, Kimconu. Since you haven't said "These are the feathers of a bird," I understand...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by MaaAdjoa

Thanks for reply. I also agree that the first example is the most plausible. I hadn't thought of that. Looks good to me now. Thanks very...

Reply by Gustavo, Contributor

Hello, MaaAdjoa, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! The hyphen is correctly used. What you should avoid is the repetition of "saving,"...
Gustavo, Contributor

Reply by Kimconu

So am I correct? 1 When you say about a bird in general, you say "This is a feather of a bird", you can also say "This is a bird's...

Reply by menem

Can we choose " went " as an informal language?

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Freeguy, Syntactically, either interpretation is possible, and ellipsis is not involved: 1) They could [ travel farther from the...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Kimconu, Interesting question! "A pig's trough" can be parsed as [ a [ pig's trough ]] (i.e., a trough of the sort that pigs use) --...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, M Elmaghraby, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! The answer is "go," which is the present subjunctive here, NOT the present...
David, Moderator

Reply by Hussein Hassan

Hello, Abdullah, Based on the information presented by Gustavo in this thread , yes, you can say: It's boring waiting at bus stops. It's...
Hussein Hassan

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: repeat
Hello, Ruifeng, Yes, you can use "again and again" for that purpose. "Again and again" is commonly used that way, and your example is fine.
David, Moderator

Reply by navi

Thank you very much, David, Just to clarify, I thought one should say 1 b) In the doorway, stood a tall dark woman. and 1a) In the...

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello again, Navi, No, you don't need to use inversion, and you haven't. You have used topicalization, and it isn't necessary, either:...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: Future
Your clear-cut answer is that both answers are perfectly correct in that context.
David, Moderator

Reply by navi

Thank you very much, David, How about these: 1a) In the doorway, a tall dark woman stood. 2a) In the bedroom, a tall dark woman sat in...

Reply by mizowahed

Re: Future
David, we need a clear-cut answer,please

Reply by Wael Shaltoot

Re: Future
David, I agree with you. Yet, the question mentioned above was one of 30 questions in our GSEC exam. Sorrowfully, our poor students were...

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Mr. Ahmed, This is the second question that has been asked twice today: https://thegrammarexchange.infopop.cc/topic/future-21
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Navi, Yes, both (1) and (2) are correct, but I'd prefer " in " an armchair. It means (a). It would mean (b) if it read "She was...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Ahmed Imam Attia, Someone else has asked the very same question today. Please see the answer I have just given Abdullah Mahrouse...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Abdullah, Both answers are correct, assuming there is no context to decide between them. Their meaning is simply different. Each...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: Future
Hello, Emad, Both answers are correct: Liverpool's players are known to be skilled. They are going to win the match easily. Liverpool's...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Islam Mohamed, Both answers are correct. I would more naturally use "is going to," but "will" works perfectly well there. If a...
David, Moderator
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