Activity

correct word order

(1) Tom sings for three hours at home every day. (2) Tom sings at home for three hours every day. (3) Tom sings for three hours every day at home. (4) Tom sings every day at home for three hours. I am not sure which word order sounds natural to native English speakers. Please help me. Thank you very much for your help.Read More...
All four sentences (word orders) sound perfectly natural to me, Ansonman. You could even experiment with putting some of those phrases at the beginning: (5) Every day, Tom sings for three hours at home. (6) Every day for three hours, Tom sings at home. (7) For three hours every day, Tom sings at home. (8) At home, Tom sings for three hours every day. (9) Every day at home, Tom sings for three hours. (10) At home every day, Tom sings for three hours. (11) For three hours at home every day,...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

(the) additional services

(1) Customers need to pay more for (the) additional services they request for their computers. (2) You need to let us know in advance for (the) additional services for your stay in our hotel. I am not sure whether or not the definite article is required in both sentences. Please help me. Thank you very much.Read More...
Your clear explanation has helped me understand how to construct these sentences better. Thank you very much.Read More...
Last Reply By ansonman · First Unread Post

idiom: hire a window

I have heard of this idiom "hire a window" from one of my non-native English speaking friends. He said it means that you cheat on major assignments, exams, and other academic work by hiring someone to do them for you. I tried to look it up in dictionaries, but I could not find it. Then, I asked him where he heard it. He said he doesn't remember. I am pretty sure he made a mistake. If it is wrong, what is the correct idiom? Thank you very much for your help.Read More...
In Cantonese, we call it “hire a gun” transliterally to mean that a third party is being asked or engaged to do examinations or to write study reports on one’s behalf. The words “gun” and “ window” sound the same in Cantonese. This means that someone has been “creative” and made up the term “hire a window”, which, of course, makes no sense at all.Read More...
Last Reply By terry · First Unread Post

Sound /look

She decided not to buy the dress. It (sounded - looked) old fashioned. What is the right choice in this sentence?Read More...
Hello, Emad, I believe DocV is poking fun at the option "sounded" because normal dresses don't emit sound and thus do not sound a certain way. I suspect the authors of the test question may have had in mind an old-fashioned appearance that was inferred on the basis of a heard report about the dress. For that other meaning, you could use "It sounded/sounds as if it were old-fashioned," where the first "it" is a dummy and the second "it" refers to the dress. I talked to Sally, who is still at...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

One in five youngesters gets anything

Hussein Hassan
Hello, there Would you please, help me understand the following sentence: According to medical experts, one in five youngesters gets anything between two and five hours' sleep at night less than their parents did at their age. I'll attach the whole text. The point is that I can't understand what "anything" means here? Each word you write is appreciated.Read More...
For me, "less" would work much, much better before "sleep." I would also change "anything" to "anywhere" (similar to DocV's "somewhere") and "did" to "got." I don't think we need to worry about the two instances of singular "their." According to medical experts, one in five youngsters gets anywhere between two and five hours' less sleep a night than their parents got at their age.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

...and it rains right now.

Hi there, This is an extract from Charmed by Canadian author Michelle Krys. What do you think about the simple form rains? Should she have written is raining instead? Why? (Why not?)Read More...
Hope, First of all, thanks for citing your source. This enabled me to find a number of excerpts from the novel online, including the chapter containing the passage you've quoted here. I like the first "rains" (“It hardly ever rains in L.A. ..."), but not so much the second (" ... and it rains right now."). I would have written it more like: 1: ... but it would have to rain now! To me this expresses the character's frustration and her futile rage against the universe and God (or the gods)...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

get there vs go there

I have heard of these questions asked. (1) How do you get there? (2) How do you go there? I don't understand the difference in meaning between the two questions. Could you please explain the difference? Thank you very much for your help.Read More...
I really appreciate the clear explanations you both gave me. Thank you very much.Read More...
Last Reply By ansonman · First Unread Post

"not a" vs "not any"

Hi there, are both not a and not any sound natural in the following examples? Yesterday was mothers' day but I did not post any photos with my mother on social media. I think importance of my mother to my life cannot be described by just clicking pictures or posting them on social sites on mother's day. Yesterday was mothers' day but I did not post a photo with my mother on social media. I think importance of my mother to my life cannot be described by just clicking a picture or posting it...Read More...
Subha, I like (4) better than (3). There are so many things wrong with (1) and (2) that I'm not even going to begin to talk about them. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Do you have 'any' books? 'vs' Do you have books?

Hi there, do I need to use any in questions and negative sentences when using plural nouns? Is it necessary to use any in the following sentences? I have found a site Do you have children? vs. Do you have ANY children? Is there a difference? | Ask The Editor | Learner's Dictionary that says It is not necessary. If I omit any will that be grammatical? Here are some examples: Hey John, do you have any books? Last month, I visited a rain forest. I did not see any animals there. To me It seems...Read More...
I wouldn't say it is mandatory, but usual. I did not see animals there sounds as if the person saw something else, that is, anything but animals.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Must

1- I really ..... visit my grandmother in Alexandria more often. ( needn't - have to - need to ) 2 - listen to me ! You ...... get a new pump for the fish tank soon. This one doesn't work well. ( must - needn't - need to ) 3- the doctor says I ..... lose 10 kilos. ( must - needn't - have to - need to )Read More...
Thanks for clarification , I would like to state that these questions are from a test.Read More...
Last Reply By egyptian2017 · First Unread Post

Word Order

ahmad
Hello, everyone, A. Approval is accorded to the change as requested for. B. Accorded is approval to the change as requested for. C. The change as requested for is accorded approval. 1. Are any of the above sentences acceptable? Thanks.Read More...
Gustavo, thanks a lot for your help. DocV, it is great to hear from you. During my unfortunate absence, I immensely missed the ever-ready helpful responses of Gustavo, the enlightening and unrivaled erudition of David, and of course, that inexpressible joy that I feel hearing from you. Thanks.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

In/of

ahmad
Hello, everyone, Merriam Websters Dictionary defines Contraband among other ways as: "illegal or prohibited traffic in goods" https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/contraband 1. Why is there an in and not an of before goods ? Thanks.Read More...
Thanks, Gustavo. It really helped.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

not three

-Three people witnessed the murder. a. -No, not three people witnessed the murder. Four people did. b. -No, it wasn't three people who witnessed the murder, it was four people. c. -No, three people didn't witness the murder. Four people did. In this context, which of the sentences a-c work? (c) would normally mean that there were three people (out of a group) who didn't witness the murder. But in this context, the speaker is repeating something that has already been said. I am not sure (c)...Read More...
I agree with David's comments. In particular, David's point was the unstated reason behind my rejection of (a), and I suspect it was Gustavo's reason as well. Azz's (c) and my (c1) must both be understood to mean that three people have been positively confirmed as not having witnessed the murder. It would perhaps be better stated as: c2: We definitely know of three people that cannot possibly have witnessed the murder. We also know of four people that were definitely there at the scene, and...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

A/the tiger

Hi there, suppose in an exam I am told to write a paragraph about "tiger"? Should I start with a or the ? A/the tiger is a ferocious animal. It eats flesh. It has four legs. Its skin is yellow with black stripes on it. Do they both sound natural? Can I say "A cheetah is faster than any other animal."? Or should I say "The cheetah is faster than any other animal."?Read More...
Hi, Subhajit: In each case, "a" is possible, but "the" is much better .Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Save

What is the best answer in this sentence :"Good swimmers (save - do) their power for the last distance.Read More...
Hello, Emad, "Save" is the better answer, of course. "Do their power" is meaningless. The sentence is a bit awkward. Here is a better way to phrase the idea: Good swimmers save their energy for the last part of the race.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

long OR hard

He did a lot of exercises in the club. What a .......... day! long - hard I think both answers are correct.Read More...
I agree with Hussein that "hard" is the better answer, and I agree with Mr. P that both are correct. Either way, the sentence appears to be sarcastic. Doing a lot of exercises in a club does not make one's entire day hard or long. It could be that he was lazy for most of the day, even though he managed to do a lot of exercises in the club. Perhaps that was the only thing he managed to do all day!Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

comparative

A. It took three times longer than I expected. B. It took three times as long as I expected. A controversial question. Do the above sentences have the same meaning?Read More...
That's a fair question. As with many such expressions, many speakers don't really think about the literal meaning of the words they're saying. Another common example in English began with the expression "I couldn't care less", which is intended to convey the idea that the speaker does not care at all, so it would be literally impossible for him to care any less than he already does. Another similar expression is the more sarcastic "as if I could care", whereby the speaker implies that it is...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Grammar

1. I have been used to working here since last year. 2. I had been used to working here until jenny showed up. Plz tell me what does it mean,when i use 'have been used 'to or 'had been used to' in a sentence.Read More...
Hello, Hasib Rahman, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! We're happy to have you with us. In the future, when you ask a grammar question here, please give the thread a title that is descriptive of its grammatical contents so other members and visitors will have a sense of what the thread is about. This thread could have been titled "had/have been used to," for example. In "used to V-ing," "used" is an adjective meaning "accustomed." Sentence (1) means "I have been accustomed to working here...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

remain;remains

1.Where they came from and why they disappeared __________ an open question. a. remain b. remains Are they both correct? 2. Where they came from and why they disappeared ____________ open questions. a. remain b. remains Are they both correct? Thanks!Read More...
Thank you very much, David, for sharing that quote. It's an extraordinary coincidence that you should have found that text. Personally, I'd opt for the singular above, as "unclear" clearly refers to the content of those questions and not to those clauses as questions. With the verb "be," the best proof is, I think, extraposing the subject: - What he thought of it and what he suffered was unclear. - It was unclear what he thought of it and what he suffered. That's a clever remark. With...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

apart from that one

Which are correct: 1) There are other good books about Kennedy's assassination than that one. 2) There are other good books about Kennedy's assassination besides that one. 3) There are other good books about Kennedy's assassination apart from that one. Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Navi, I'm kind of OK with (2). To me, the use of "than" in (1) demands a more obvious comparative: 1a: There are better books about Kennedy's assassination than that one. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

is looking or looks

Hi These are two examples from the book Grammar in Use. Why in the first sentence both continuous and simple are used but in the second only simple? 1. I hear you're having your house repainted. How 's it looking? (or How does it look?) 2. I bought this new dress today. How does it look?Read More...
Sorry DocV, I just wanted to test whether we can send an empty post or not. Then I deleted the empty post. I was not offended at all. I know it was only a joke.Read More...
Last Reply By tara · First Unread Post

Word order

1. Mr James Parker in his book “Over the Rainbow” suggested that a successful business has the following characteristics. 2. In his book “Over the Rainbow”, Mr James Parker suggested that a successful business has the following characteristics. 3. Mr James Parker suggested in his book “Over the Rainbow” that a successful business has the following characteristics. which one is correct? And which one do you prefer? It seems to me that 1 and 2 are correct. Where should “in his book xxx” be...Read More...
I am in complete agreement with David here. The indicative "has" and the subjunctive "have" both work, and the choice of which to use changes the meaning of the sentence entirely. I neglected to make that point clear in my previous post. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Singular Or Plural Nouns With "No" When "Except" Is Used

Should I use singular countable nouns or plural countable nouns with no along with the word except ? There is no scientist who is as renowned as Einstein except Stephen Hawking. There are no scientists who are as renowned as Einstein except Stephen Hawking. I have no book except this red one. I have no books except this red one. I know it is more natural to use no with countable plural nouns in general. So we would generally say "There are no scientists in the hall." and "I don't have any...Read More...
The reason might be that you are contrasting a plural noun with a singular one. However, I have to say I like none of those sentences, and would resort to "only" to express those ideas in a more natural way, for example: - The only scientist who is as renowned as Einstein is Stephen Hawking. - This red book is the only one I have.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

of vs in

1. This problem is more difficult than that one. Actually, this is the most difficult problem of the book . 2. Sharks are more dangerous than whales. They are the most dangerous animals of the sea . I am not happy with "of the book, of the sea". Shouldn't they be: in the book, in the sea? (Source: Iran's English Coursebooks, grade 12)Read More...
Hello, Freeguy -- I am not happy with them, either. Yes, they should, at least from the standpoint of idiomaticity. "Of the book" is technically OK in (1), but there is the distracting sense that the problem may belong to the book. You could, however, use the possessive and speak of "the book's most difficult problem." That would naturally be interpreted as referring to the most difficult problem in the book. As for (2), you could use "of" and "in": "the most dangerous animal of all the...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

"I probably will" VS "I would"

Helen: Would you attend my party tomorrow? John: I probably will. Helen: Would you attend my party tomorrow? John: I would. Does the answer 'probably will' equal to 'would'? If not, what's the difference?Read More...
Wemcho, I think that with a present tense verb in the first sentence, as you have in (#8), I would want to see either a future tense verb or something akin to a conditional in the second sentence. 8a: It's five o'clock now. Sooner or later, Peter will finish his homework. 8b: It's five o'clock now. Sooner or later, Peter must finish his homework. By the way, Gustavo, thanks for your support in your earlier post. You make an interesting point with (#6). DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Theme line

When the sentence, “Creating a better world through design.” Is changed to... “Creating a better world for people through the power of design.” does the grammar change? It feels clunky.Read More...
Hello, William, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! In each case, you're not dealing with a sentence but with a gerund or participial phrase. If the phrase is supposed to be the subject of a predicate-less sentence, then it is a gerund (noun phrase) and could be expanded into a sentence like this: (1a) Creating a better world through design is what we do . (1b) Creating a better world for people through the power of design is what we do . If, by contrast, we suppose that the phrase is the...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Singular countable nouns after "there isn't any"

Can I ever use singular countable nouns after there isn't any ? I have read many books that say any can be used with both singular and plural countable nouns. Though plural nouns is more more common in negative sentences. I sometimes see native speakers also use any with singular countable nouns in negative sentences. What is the rule? Here's the example: There isn't any pen in my bag. I know most people would say "There are no pens.." or "There are not any pens..." but when can I use any...Read More...

Weekly Report (.......... to ...........)

Dear Sir/Madam, Please review my below draft and kindly advice. Thanks Please find attached my weekly report for the week from 06th Jan to 10th Jan for your kind record.Read More...
Hello, Shaikh. Are you aware that you have joined a website for discussing questions about English grammar? Do you have a question about English grammar that you would like to discuss?Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Grammar

There is a sentence : The game requests that players advance in a map,following a specially-designed route,buying properties as they move on. Why is not like this: add "and" …advance in a map,following a specially-designed route, and buying properties as they move on.Read More...
Hello, Sunnytzuching, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange, where we hope to see many more questions from you! I agree with you that "and" should be used there (as there are only two gerunds, I wouldn't use a comma before it): The game requests that players advance in a map, following a specially-designed route and buying properties as they move on. Both gerunds express how players should advance during the game, or what they should do to do so.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Spaghetti and meatballs is/are my favorite dish.

Hello, Spaghetti and meatballs is/are a good meal. Spaghetti and meatballs is/are a good dish. Chicken and biscuits is/are a good meal. Chicken and biscuits is/are a good dish. My question is - Is “is” or “are” correct in these situations? ThanksRead More...
I know, DocV. I used it as a joke. Speaking more than one language is something one acquires. Also, I used "born" as attached to the verb "be," not as an adjective for "polyglots": We were born / polyglots // They were born / poor.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

all/each/every

Which is correct: 1) All of the people who walked down that street before me should have picked up that banana peel. 2) Each of the people who walked down that street before me should have picked up that banana peel. 3) Every one of the people who walked down that street before me should have picked up that banana peel. Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Thank you very much, David, How about: 4 ) Anyone who walked down that street before me should have picked up that banana peel. Does that one work? Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Last Reply By navi · First Unread Post

There was no/not a/not any

What is the difference between there was no, there was not a and there was not any ? Yesterday I visited a very undevelopped area in my tour of Africa. I rented a room in a hotel there. The hotel lacked basic facilites. There was no television set/ not a television set/ not any television set in the room. To negate the sentence "there are some televison sets in The US." We can say either "There are not any/no television sets in The US." But To negate the sentence "there is a twlevision set...Read More...
Hi, Subhajit, "There is/was no television set" and "There are/were no television sets" are by far the most usual forms. "not a" and "not any" are emphatic ("not" will be usually contracted): A: Well, at least you had a TV set. B: What are you speaking about? There was n't a TV set! A: Well, you can watch the TV. B: But there are n't any TV sets here!Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

suggest

A: What did you ( ) to him? B: A piece of advice on study. 1. send; 2. advise; 3. suggest; 4. carry Which one should I choose? My choice is 1, but the answer is 3. I thought the answer was wrong as they often are.:D 3 sounds redundant to me. Thank you.Read More...
Hi, Ruifeng, You can chose (1), (3), or (4). Each is correct, but each has a different meaning. The only incorrect answer is (2).Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

don't go out and...

1) Don't go out of the house leaving the front door open. 2) Don't go out of the house and leave the front door open. These sentences are supposed to mean: If you go out of the house, close the front door. 3) Don't have an affair breaking your wife's heart. 4) Don't have an affair and break your wife's heart. These two are supposed to mean: Don't have an affair. If you do, you will break your wife's heart. Do the sentences 1-4 work with the intended meanings? Do they need commas? Gratefully,...Read More...
I agree with Gustavo's preferences. However, Navi, I think that all of your examples are a little awkward, and would benefit by rephrasing that would shift the focus: 1a: Close the door behind you when you leave the house. 4a: Don't have an affair; that would break your wife's heart. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

omission of "any"

Can I omit any in the following sentences with uncountable nouns? Do they still sound natural without it? If philosophers were made presidents instead of politicians, There would not be (any) war. if we keep on wasting drinking water like this, in future there will not be (any) drinking water.Read More...
Hi, Subhajit, I like the idea that you are trying to express in your first example. You can omit "any" from those sentences. However, if you do, I recommend also changing "would/will not be NP" to "would/will be no NP": If presidents were philosophers rather than politicians, there would be no war. If we keep on wasting drinking water like this, in the future there will be no drinking water. I have made some other adjustments to the sentences. When I read the "if"-clause of your first...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Past simple VS past perfect with 'until'

Hussein Hassan
Good morning, our teachers, Would you please, help me to clarify the difference in meaning between the following two sentences: People hadn't travelled easily round the world from west to east until they dug the Suez Canal. People didn't travel easily round the world from west to east until they had dug the Suez Canal. Many thanks ...Read More...
Thank you, David for your reply and your recommendation, but I'd like to know why the two sentences above are awkward? Thanks a lot, Gustavo for your perception.Read More...
Last Reply By Hussein Hassan · First Unread Post

Having to punish

He dislikes having to punish his servants. Here ’having to punish his servants’ is a gerund phrase functioning as object of the verb. But I am unable to understand the usage of infinitive ‘to punish’ after ‘having’ . Please help me in understanding this.Read More...
Thank you, David and Gustavo.Read More...
Last Reply By symphony · First Unread Post

he read/ he had read

Did he have the necessary information to understand the lecture? 1) He said he read the relevant material before coming. 2) He said he had read the relevant material before coming. 3) He said he read the relevant material before. 4) He said he had read the relevant material before. I see three possibilities here: a) He read the relevant material a short time before the lecture in preparation for it b) He read the relevant material a short time before the lecture but not in preparation for it...Read More...

"Will" vs "would"

Hi there, do will and would both sound right in the given context as an English speaker to you? Communism is an ideological and a socialpolitical movement. Its aim is to set up a communist society. This society would/will be based on the common ownership of the means of production and would lack social classes, money, and a state. Communism - Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia In this article on Wikipedia would is used. As I have understood I think it is like conditional...Read More...
Hi, Subhajit, Neither "will" nor "would" sounds right. It would be better to combine the third sentence with the second: Communism is an ideological and a social-political movement. Its aim is to set up a communist society—a society based on . . . . There are other problems with the passage. I'd rather not fix the whole thing.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

to and of

(1) Poor introduction to the scenario of the topic. (2) Poor introduction of the scenario of the topic. May I know which of the above sentence is grammatical?Read More...
Hi, Joshua, Neither (1) nor (2) is a sentence. They are each noun phrases, and even as noun phrases they are not well formed. "Introduction" is a count noun and takes an article: "a" or "the." If you began the noun phrases with "a" or "the," either noun phrase would be possible. To decide between "to" and "of," one would need to take into account the context, and you haven't provided a context. Once you fix the noun phrase, you will be well on your way to, but still a long way from, having...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

really

1) It really was not safe. 2) It was really not safe. 3) It was not safe really. 4) It was not really safe. How do you understand sentences 1-4? I see three possible meanings: a) It was not safe at all. b) In reality, it was not safe. c) It was not completely safe. Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Hello, Navi, I understand none of the sentences to mean (c), (1) and (3) to mean (b), (2) to mean (a), and (4) to mean (d): (d) It was not very safe. That is assuming normal emphasis. With special emphasis on "really was," (1) would naturally be used to affirm somebody else's assertion: A: Tom said that riding elevators at that period in history was not safe. B: Tom was right. It really was not safe. Incidentally, instead of (2), most people would say: "It was really unsafe ."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

infinitives yet again

Which are correct: 1) His suit to wear at official meetings is at the cleaner's but his suit to wear at parties is here. 2) His pen to sign official documents is on the desk, but his pen to take notes is in his pocket. 3) His tools to fix cars are in the garage, but his tools to repair electronic devices are here. 4) His tools to fix cars with are in the garage, but his tools to repair electronic devices with are here. 5) I stole his tools to fix cars. 6) I stole his tools to fix cars with.Read More...
Hi, Navi, I think the sentence above is correct considering that we can say " a suit to wear at official meetings/at parties," where "to wear" is passive in meaning, being equivalent to "(suitable) to be worn." Same as above, with the only difference that the infinitive indicates the purpose for using the pen. I think both are correct. (3) is similar to (2). (4) introduces a preposition of instrument, being more idiomatic, less formal than: 4') His tools with which to fix cars... / with...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Difference between "will" and "would"

What is the difference between will and would in the following sentence? In the following news link, why is would used instead of will ? Here is the link: Here is the Headline: Why the US would never win a trade war with ChinaRead More...
It is true that the use of conditional "would" can be deemed to involve the implicit existence of a type 2 conditional clause (i.e., a conditional clause in the unreal past) in the context: Why the US would never win a trade war with China (if there was/were a trade war between both countries) I don't think he would leave FCB (if he was/were offered a lot of money). However, it is no less true that "would" can be used to emphazise the improbability of the event even if the condition is...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

<could> for single past ability?

grammarcrazed
Hello everyone: According to grammar books, when you are refereeing to a general past ability , you can use both “ could ” and “ was/were able to ”, but when the reference is to a single occasion in the past , only “ was/were able to ”, “ managed to ”, or “ succeeded in ” should be used. But while I was listening to an audible book, “ English Grammar Boot Camp” by professor Ann Curzan, I heard her say “ and I could find it ” in the following context. “Off of” tends to be colloquial, but it...Read More...
Thanks, Gustavo.Read More...
Last Reply By grammarcrazed · First Unread Post

such ... that

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Please tell me which is correct among these sentences: 1. Such a strong public opinion was it that he had to resign. 2. Such was a strong public opinion that he had to resign. 3. Such was the strength of public opinion that he had to resign. Thank you.Read More...
Thank you, Gustavo and David. Both your explanations solved all my problems. Thank you so much.Read More...
Last Reply By cocoricot · First Unread Post

yet/still

1) I might beat this cancer yet. 2) I might still beat this cancer. Is there any difference between the meanings of '1' and '2'? 3) Our team might win yet. 4) Our team might still win. Is there any difference between the meaning of '3' and '4'? Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Hello, Navi, To make the sentences synonymous, it would be better to place "still" right after the subject (before the modal): "Our team still might win" <--> "Our team might win yet"; "I still might beat this cancer" <--> "I might beat this cancer yet." With "still" placed where you have it, after the modal but before the verb ("Our team might still win"; "I might still beat this cancer"), it is as if there were an implicit "in spite of" or "regardless of" or "even with," etc.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

tenses under influence!

1) As a writer, I was influenced by the work of Kafka, which I read at a very young age. 2) As a writer, I am influenced by the work of Kafka, which I read at a very young age. 3) As a writer, I have been influenced by the work of Kafka, which I read at a very young age. Are all three correct? Is there a difference in the meaning? a) I read Kafka before I started writing, but the influence was there when I started to write b) the influence was there but is not there anymore c) the influence...Read More...
Thank you very much, Gustavo, Yes, what you say makes perfect sense. In my mind, 'I am influenced' was not like 'I am affected' but like 'I am washed', if you will. I think that is the influence of my native language. I am under the influence of my mother tongue. I am not sure I am expressing myself clearly and you can see where I had gone astray, but I think things are clear now for me. Respectfully, NaviRead More...
Last Reply By navi · First Unread Post

yet/still

1) I might beat this cancer yet. 2) I might still beat this cancer. Is there any difference between the meanings of '1' and '2'? 3) Our team might win yet. 4) Our team might still win. Is there any difference between the meaning of '3' and '4'? Which should be used if there is a limited amount of time available? That is the case in the second set of examples. Which should be used if the event we are talking about is very unlikely. I think 'yet' might have such an implication. HAPPY NEW YEAR...Read More...

Try

Hello, If you can't find the key, try ( to open - opening) the lock with something like a knife or a screwdriver. Thanks in advance.Read More...
Happy New Year! I agree with David on all counts. I usually tell my students that "try" + infinitive is preferred when some effort is involved (actually, some effort might arise from trying to open a lock with an object that is not originally intended for that purpose, as is the case with a knife or a screwdriver), while "try" + gerund is used when it carries the meaning of experimenting, as conveyed by David's paraphrasis:Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Happy 2019!

It's already officially 2019 here in China. On this crisp new year's morning, I want to express my gratitude to every teacher for your priceless help in 2018 and for the privilege of ever being able to join you on this forum. I wish you--my dear teachers, every member and all your families a GREAT NEW YEAR! 😊😊 😊祝大家新年快乐! zhu da jia xin nian kuai le!😊Read More...
Thank you, David, for your nice words. As I've told you countless times, GE does not only mean work for me, but the possibility of continuing learning. I was very lucky to find GE a few years ago, and we are very lucky to have you in charge and DocV on board. Happy New Year! (By the way, I loved the picture, which happens to show my animal in the Chinese horoscope .)Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

will vs be going to

As you know, there are differences between "be going to" and "will" when we want to refer to some actions in the future. So, which of the following response would be more appropriate? Wow, the grass is getting tall. I think I ....... cut it tomorrow 1) will 2) am going to For me, "Wow, the grass is getting tall" is a sign for an instant decision, hence "will". Thanks.Read More...
According to Oxford English Grammar Course by Swan & Walter: - going to - talk about intentions - use ‘will’ at the moment when we decide somethingRead More...
Last Reply By terry · First Unread Post

Zero Article/Definite Article/Indefinite Article

ahmad
Hello, everyone, 1. Which of the following sentences is/are correct? A. Someone in this room has been to hospital today. B. Someone in this room has been to a hospital today. C. Someone in this room has been to the hospital today. Thanks. PS: I am taking it to be the case that there are more than one hospitals in the area, and that there is no prior reference to or any mention of any hospital etc.Read More...
Thanks, David.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

Intend

ahmad
Hello, everyone, A happy new year to all of you. A. The event intended to introduce students to broader perspective and scope of Management Studies. B. The event was intended to introduce students to broader perspective and scope of Management Studies. 1. Are both the sentences correct? 2. Do I need to put 'Management Studies' in lower case? Thanks.Read More...
Thanks a lot, David. I have been unbelievably busy for last few months, which is why I replied so late.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

Happy New Year

What are your New Year resolutions? Settle your debt? Learn a new language? Go on diet? Do more physical exercise? Get taller? No matter what. Happy New Year!Read More...
Gustavo. Instead of 11 minutes, one of my New Year resolutions is to run for at least 25 minutes a day; well, once in alternate day is not bad; maybe twice a week is still better than nothing, etc. Reason: I have to get a new identity card soon with a new photo!Read More...
Last Reply By terry · First Unread Post

"a" vs "any"

What is the difference between a and any in the following sentenc? Can a bulletproof vest stop a bulltet fired from an AK-47? Can any bulletproof vest stop a bulltet fired from an AK-47? Does the second one using any mean to say "Does there exist a single bulletproof vest that can stop a bullet fired from an Ak-47"?Read More...
Hi, Subhajit: Your examples here aren't very pleasant, but you are correct that the one with "any" has the meaning "Does there exist a single bulletproof vest that . . . [etc.]?" In a normal context, that is not the desired meaning. We would simply say, "Can a bulletproof vest stop a bullet fired from this type of gun?" If the sentence with "any" were used, it would receive emphatic stress, and there would be preceding context justifying its use with stress -- for example: "This (supposedly)...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Scarce

Do we say "a rare collection of stamps "or “ a scarce collection of stamps“?Read More...
Gustavo, Thank you for this feedback. First, I agree that "rare stamp collections" is unpalatably ambiguous, possibly in more ways than have already come to your mind. I find that your example about the Indian collection justifies my use of "generally" as opposed to making a blanket statement. Stamp collections in general are not rare, and it is fair to assume that every collection that exists is actually unique. But this article that you shared speaks of an exhibition of a collection that...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

"Have been doing" vs "have done"

Hi there, What's the difference between have done or have been doing in the following context? Can I use both in the following context? John: Can you please repair my computer? Me: Yeah!! it's too easy. I have been doing/have done this for 3 years.Read More...
Hi, Subhajit, The natural, native choice in the sentence in question is the present perfect progressive: "I've been doing this for three years." While the present perfect simple is possible, it is not the native choice, at least not without the addition of "now": "I've done this for three years now." The sentence "I've repaired computers for three years" by itself can easily mean that you done that for a three-year period of time in the past. You want the up-to-now reading here. That's why...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

reflexive not used? No.2

This is another question related to the previous one. As you may have noticed, Swan claims that (a) is wrong. Again, I believe we have a sentence like (b): (a) His book is selling itself well . (b) His book is selling itself . Here's my take: "The ____ sells itself" is an idiomatic expression. "His book is selling itself well" is not wrong, but would be a very unusual construction. "His book sells itself well " would be more common. I also think "The book sells itself" is also fine. But that...Read More...
Hi, Freeguy, Swan is right that "His book is selling itself well" is wrong. And you are right that you can correctly say, "His book is selling itself," and that the problem with the sentence that Swan rejects is the use of the adverb "well." Sentences like "His book is selling itself," "The book will sell itself," etc., mean that the seller does not have to make any real efforts to sell the thing. If he puts the book out, someone will buy it. The sentence "His book is selling itself" and...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Tense with "recently"

Hi there, should I use recently with simple past or present perfect? I recently bought a mobile. It has very good features with a four-GB ram. I just love the mobile. I have recently bought a mobile. It has very good features with a four-GB ram. I just love the mobile. I have found a similar example on this site using simple past tense. As an English speaker which one would you prefer in the given context?Read More...
Hi, Subhajit, Both sentences are correct. You can choose the simple past ("I recently bought a mobile"), and you can choose the present perfect ("I have recently bought a mobile"). The choice is yours. Speakers of American English are more likely to choose the simple past in that context, whereas British speakers, who tend to be more fond of using the present perfect, might favor the present perfect. I hope you realize that the second sentence ("It has very good features") does not involve...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

tense

The BBC is not supposed to editorialize about the news. This is an example sentence from the LDOCE. My questions are: Did the editor give the editorial or not? When can this comment be made, right after or before? Thanks.Read More...
Ruifeng, First off, I agree with everything David has said. You said: I don't mean to speak for David, but I agree with your interpretation. You said: Before I answer your question (strictly speaking), I must advise you that, in order to convey your meaning properly, you need to put quotation marks around the word "auxiliary", or italicize it. Otherwise, the question lends itself to myriad misinterpretations. As to whether you should use a full stop after the word "auxiliary" in this...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

If you have (any) questions

Do I need to use any in the following sentence? Does any change the meaning in the following sentence? And as an English speaker will you leave any out? If you have (any) questions on the subject, feel free to ask me.Read More...
Hi, Subhajit, You can use either "if you have any questions" or "if you have questions." The determiner "any" is optional. English speakers use both constructions with almost equal frequency. From the Corpus of Contemporary American English: "if you have any questions": 210 "if you have questions": 345 The effect on meaning that "any" has is that it emphasizes that there need not be many questions at all in order for the condition to be fulfilled; indeed, "if you have any questions" implies...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

reflexive not used?

Hello, While I was reading the book "Practical English Usage, 3rd edition, page 477, I came across an example, wherein the writer, Michael Swan, of worldwide fame, made a strange claim. Why strange? Because I firmly believe in this very section he's trying to explain things using decontextualized examples. He says sentence (a) below is wrong: (a) Suddenly the door opened itself. Although I believe the above sentence is less common than the version with no reflexive pronoun, I don't think...Read More...
The two examples where intransitive "open" appears in Swan are provided under sections 493 (item 9) and 609: I have to say I don't like the examples under item (9) above, where it says Some other verbs which do not normally have reflexive pronouns... While it is true that those verbs will not take the reflexive form, it is also true that speakers and students of English will not readily understand why verbs like concentrate, feel and hurry should be reflexive at all. Section 609 is, in my...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

unaware or unknowing

1. Unaware of recent political developments, he was taken by surprise upon his arrival in the capital. 2. Unknowing of recent political developments, he was taken by surprise upon his arrival in the capital. I think the first one is correct, but what about the second one? Thanks.:)Read More...
Hi, Ruifeng, Yes, (1) is correct. Sentence (2) is odd. Most people would say this instead: (2a) Not knowing of recent political developments, he was taken by surprise.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

To be... sequin/sequined/sequinned?

I'm doing some proofreading for a client's post about sequins (she's a fashion blogger). The first line starts, "'Tis the season to be... sequin." Is this correct? My gut says it should be "sequined or sequinned." Any insight would be appreciated! Thanks!Read More...
Mwr829, I'm sorry that I've been unable to respond to your post. I've been under the weather. I think that your client was attempting to be clever by using the semi-assonant rhyme combination of "season" and "sequin". It doesn't work for me, at least out of context. I agree with your preference of "sequined" or "sequinned" (both spellings are accepted). I'm curious though. Was there a precedent or subsequent line that ended in a word that was supposed to rhyme with "sequin"? I'm imagining...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

an injured man

1) We have a man injured. 2) We have an injured man. What is the difference in the meanings? 3) There was a man injured, lying on the balcony. 4) There was an injured man, lying on the balcony. What is the difference in the meanings? Gratefully, NaviRead More...
I agree with Gustavo. I definitely think that the comma should be omitted in (4). Of course, omitting the comma in (3) changes the meaning entirely. Best of the rest of the year and the next, DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Used to

Can we say "He will be used to driving." or we must say "He will get used to driving."Read More...
Hi, Emad, As you know, "be used to" refers to the state of being in a certain habit, while "get used to" refers to the process of acquiring a habit. We can imagine contexts in which both "will be used to driving" and "will get used to driving" can work, for example: He is still afraid of driving, but I imagine that in a couple of months from now he will (already) be used to it (to driving). He is afraid of driving, but I bet he will get used to it (to driving) after some practice.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Had met/have met before.

Which is correct, "Had met before" or "have met before", in the following context: Hey mom, Today, I met a man named Sunil Das. He said he knew me and he said many things about me that were true. But I can't remember if I had met him/have met him before.Read More...
Both choices are unnatural in that context, Subhajit, because the last sentence is redundant; it communicates nothing that the second to last sentence has not already communicated. However, if you deleted "It was the best match I have ever seen," then you could use either "I have never seen a match like that before" (present perfect) or "I had never seen a match like that before" (past perfect). Again, you are talking about an experience that is still fresh, even though it is in the recent...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

loud, loudly and noise

1.When someone is talking too loud, we say they are making noise, making a noise or making noises? 2.Talk loud or talk loudly? What's the difference? Thanks.:)Read More...
Hi, Ruifeng, When someone is talking too loud(ly), we can say that he is being noisy or making too much noise. We don't say, in that context, that he is making a noise or making noises. If the person were not talking but hooting, whistling, squealing, etc., then we could say that he was making a noise or making noises. There is no difference. As an adverb, "loud" means "loudly." I know that I find it more natural, as a native speaker, to say "talk loud," though I sometimes use "talk loudly"...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

He was almost hit.

a. He was almost hit. b. He almost was hit. Are they both correct?Read More...
Hi, Kis, Yes, they are both correct. Although I prefer (a) to (b), the correctness of (b) stands out when ellipsis is involved. Then "almost" needs to come before "was": A: Was he hit? B: He almost was. (NOT: * He was almost. ) Another interesting observation that can be made here is that, with the "get" passive, "almost" likewise must come right after "He": He almost got hit. NOT: * He got almost hit.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

restrictive/non-restrictive

1) The islands lie along the Florida Straits, dividing the Atlantic Ocean to the east from the Gulf of Mexico to the northwest, and defining one edge of Florida Bay. "The islands" are the Florida Keys. Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Florida_Keys 2) 1) The islands lie along the Florida Straits, dividing the Atlantic Ocean , to the east , from the Gulf of Mexico , to the northwest, and defining one edge of Florida Bay. Sentence '1' is from the Wikipedia article on the Florida Keys.Read More...
Hi, Navi, Your version is technically (i.e. grammatically) more correct than the one in Wikipedia. However, I think the omission of commas in this particular case is more common because the phrases in question ( to the east and to the northwest ) are reminiscent of similar phrases used to describe boundaries, in which case using the comma would be wrong: - The islands are bounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the east and by the Gulf of Mexico to the northwest .Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

a reduction in thickness above

Architecture A ledge or recess in a wall formed by a reduction in thickness above; a setoff. Definition of "offset" in the American Heritage Dictionary Source: https://www.ahdictionary.com/word/search.html?q=offset Does "above" modify "thickness" or "a reduction"? Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Oh, it looks as though I was composing when Gustavo replied. My reply and his are compatible. We are saying the same thing in two different ways. The main difference is that I have described "above" as an intransitive prepositional phrase and he has described it as an adverb. I am OK with either classification. Whether it is a lexical adverb or a lexical preposition here, it is acting as an adverbial. Another slight difference is that Gustavo has described "above" as modifying "reduction in...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

"anyone" vs "anyone else"

What the difference between anyone and anyone else in the following sentences? Should I leave out else? John loves me more than anyone in the world. John loves me more than anyone else in the world. In 20 years John has earned more money than anyone has done. In 20 years John has earned more money than anyone else has done.Read More...

MERRY CHRISTMAS

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Christmas is coming nearer and nearer. I am full of joy. I wish all of you, our beloved teachers, MERRY CHRISTMAS. Coco. :)Read More...
Tara, Ruifeng, Cocoricot, Subha, Thank you all. May you and your families be blessed in the coming year. This also goes for my many other friends that I've had the privilege of getting to know on this forum. Peace and love, DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Usage of "any"

Hi there, are the following sentences correct? As an English speaker which one would you prefer? I admit I have asked many questions regarding any . Still I have some doubts. If any student is interested in joining the programme, he or she is requested to contact the authority. If any students are interested in joining the programme, they are requested to contact the authority. Any student interested in joining the programme is requested to contact the authority. Any students interested in...Read More...
Hi, Subhajit, While all four sentences are correct, I strongly prefer (3) and (4). The "if"-clauses of the first two sentences could easily be used in a context in which the "if"-clauses are not defining who is requested to contact the authority -- for example: 1a. If any student is interested in joining the program, please let us know. 2a. If any students are interested in joining the program, they are welcome to. Between (3) and (4), I prefer (3). With (3), there is the sense that there...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

PREPOSITION GOES AFTER RUN

I have a question about the preposition that follows the verb " run " in this sentence: - some calculators run ......... solar power. As an English learner, I may use "by", but I wonder if there is any preposition used by native speakers? I am looking forward to any of your explanation with an answer to the given question. Many thanks.Read More...
Tracy Ha, Welcome to the Grammar Exchange. I would only use the preposition "on" in this context. Similarly: A: Henry's car runs on gasoline, but Jimmy's runs on solar power. We could use the phrase "is powered by" instead of "runs on", but I would then want to use a different noun as the object of the preposition in order to avoid a redundant sound: B: Jimmy's car is powered by solar energy. I hope this helps. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Once time had been gone? VS Once time was gone : which one is correct

This is a very very important question to me. Let me repeat the question again: which sentence is correct?(I hope the both are correct) 1. it taught the students that it could never be recovered once time had been gone. 2. it taught the students that it could never be recovered once time was gone. Thanks for the helpRead More...
Suesteem, Welcome to the Grammar Exchange and thank you for your question. Unfortunately, neither of your examples make grammatical sense. If you are quoting from a published source, please provide a link if possible, or at least cite the title and author. Otherwise, I'll at least need to know the context in which the sentence occurs. What does "it" refer to? Please provide at least a paragraph or two to help us understand what is going on with "time". Thanks, DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

I 'shall/would' be highly obliged if you 'would' take immediate steps in this regard.

Hi there, can anyone please tell me what the difference between two underlined sentence is? To The Chief Engineer, Telephone Bhawan, Kolkata - 700091 Sub : New telephone connection Dear sir, I would like to state that I applied for a new telephone on 05.02.2016. Though more than two years have passed since the application, I have not received the new connection yet nor have I been informed at what stage my application for the connection is at present. Kindly let me know when I can expect the...Read More...
Hi, Subhajit123, I find both sentences to be correct. The only difference I find is that in the first sentence the writer seems to be more certain that the company will solve the problem (that is why a Type 1 conditional is used). Instead, the second sentence is a Type 2 conditional that sounds sligthly less probable but at the same time more polite, mainly because of the use of the second "would." Actually, a typical conditional of this kind would use past simple in the condition: - I would...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

in a hurry and in haste

I understand these prases have basically the same meaning. If so, why does the former have an indefinite article and the latter no article? Any logical explanation?Read More...
Fujibei, First, let me thank you for your question. Second, let me suggest that, even though featuring the focus of your question in the subject heading of the thread is very helpful, it would also be nice if you would also include the phrases in the body of your post. I like all of the examples that Gustavo and David have suggested, but their explanations all seem to be missing something. First, I find the phrase "in haste" to be borderline archaic. I'm trying to think whether I've ever...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Why do parallel structure rules not apply here?

The following sentence reads to me as grammatically correct, but when a student asked why it doesn't violate parallel structure rules, I didn't know how to answer: "European Union member states voted to extend a ban on neonicotinoid pesticides and have begun to put money toward further studies of how abundance is changing, what is causing those changes and what can be done" (https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/27/magazine/insect-apocalypse.html). It's not the final list of clauses that's the...Read More...
Hello, JamesH, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! You seem to be under the impression that verb phrases cannot be coordinated if they are in different tenses, whereas that is perfectly fine. For example: Bill graduated from law school and has begun to work for a law firm. I saw Bill yesterday and will see him again tomorrow. The thief was arrested and has been sentenced to two years in prison. There is nothing wrong with the sentence you have quoted. It contains no violations of required...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Unless anything/something is done...

Hi all GE members and moderators, Which sentence with "unless" is considered correct to replace the sentence "If nothing is done, this species will disappear soon"? a) Unless anything is done, the species will disappear. b) Unless something is done, the species will disappear. As I searched the Google Books, I found many sentences that include "Unless anything...". Logically, "unless" means "if...not", so "anything" seems to be correct. However, I also found many sentences in which "Unless...Read More...
And David, I'm truly sorry if it appeared that I was disagreeing with you. I took Tony's response to mean that he believed that you were, in fact, endorsing those examples. The point I intended to make was that his inferences from your reply were off the mark. Respectfully, DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

grow vs are grown

Bananas originated in Asia but now ..... in the tropics of both hemispheres of the world. They were introduced to the Americas in 1516. 1) grow 2) are grown Do you think #1 is ungrammatical here? According to "Understanding and Using English Grammar", written by Betty Azar (page 214), in the above sentence, passive is preferred! (No further explanations) Would you please elaborate on the reason? Thanks.Read More...
Tell your native friends to try and explain themselves better next time. It does seem that "banana plants" is more usual than "bananas" to refer to the trees, as these banana experts seem to imply at the beginning of the page. However, please note that somewhere in the middle the mentioned page says: Bananas aren't real trees, not even palm trees, even though they are often called banana palms. Bananas are perennial herbs. The use of "bananas" above clearly refers to the plants, trees,...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Reported speech

Help me answer this question. She wondered if I .................. my leg on that ski slope. 1) break 2) breaks 3) had broken 4) broke I think (3) is the best answer. I prefer it to (4) because " breaking the leg " was prior to " wondering about it ". Am i right? The source is an outside book called "The Best". Thanks.Read More...
Thanks for your help.Read More...
Last Reply By Yama · First Unread Post

as it has dawned on us

a. It dawned on him like on every one of us here that life is rarely fair. b. It dawned on him like every one of us here that life is rarely fair. c. It dawned on him as it has on every one of us here that life is rarely fair. d. It dawned on him as it has every one of us here that life is rarely fair. Which of the above sentences are grammatically correct? Many thanksRead More...

Today a trgic accident "has happened/happened"

Hi there, "has happened" or "happened" : Which one sounds natural? Are they both correct? And in the following reporting which tenses are correct? Kolkata, 14th December, 2018: Today a tragic rail accident has happened/happened near Kolkata. At least 50 people have died/died in the accident. Witnesses say/said the number of deaths could be more.Read More...
Hello, SUBHAJI T , Swan in his book Practical English Usage said, 'We normally use the present perfect to announce news, but when we give more details, we usually change to a past tense.' , so I would think that you can say: Kolkata, 14th December, 2018: Today a tragic rail accident has happened near Kolkata. At least 50 people died in the accident. Witnesses said the number of deaths could be more. I guess (I'm not sure) we can use the simple present in the 3rd sentence: Witnesses say the...Read More...
Last Reply By Hussein Hassan · First Unread Post
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