Activity

past or present perfect

Could you please answer this question? He is walking to work as he ....................................... his car since last Monday. (sold/has sold )Read More...

"A/an" vs "one" vs "you" vs "someone"

Hi there, can anyone please tell me what the difference between a/an , one and you in the following sentences? Are they all correct and do they mean the same? One should be careful around one’s stove to avoid burning oneself . You should be careful around your stove to avoid burning yourself . A person should be careful around their stove to avoid burning themselves . And.......... 4. How to tell if one has diabetes? 5. How to tell if you have diabetes? 6. How to tell if someone has...Read More...

Use of comma

Should I use a comma in the next sentence? The police could not find the source of the fire, nor could the fire chief.Read More...
I agree. I'd say that it is the inversion following "nor" that causes a break between both coordinate clauses. A comma is required between a clause in normal order and an inverted one. Here are some more examples taken from the Longman Dictionary: - I don’t expect children to be rude , nor do I expect to be disobeyed. - They couldn’t understand it at the time , and nor could we . - Worrall was not at the meeting , nor was he at work yesterday . The same happens if the second clause is...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Why is the simple present?

--"You bring news, I trust?" (Harry Porter) Why not the simple past instead? Thanks😀Read More...
Hi, Ruifeng, The simple past would have a totally different meaning. The speaker means to refer to the present, not to the past. The simple present is being used instead of the present perfect ("You have brought news") or the present progressive ("You are bringing news"). The usage of the simple present here is the same as the one that we often hear in live sports commentary. It is a specialized use of the simple present. He shoots! He scores! The crowd goes wild!Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

a little money

1) Money is better than absolute poverty. 2) A little money is better than absolute poverty. 3) Some money is better than absolute poverty. 4) No money is better than being heavily in debt. Which of the above are grammatically correct and make sense? Which are idiomatic? Which are acceptable in formal English? . Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Thank you very much, DocV, I do appreciate it, but I wasn't sure it was really there. Respectfully, NaviRead More...
Last Reply By navi · First Unread Post

dangling modifier

Hi, teachers I'd like to know whether this sentence in the attachment Ok or not. I think it is a misrelated participle. By the way, it is from our text book for secondary stage in Egypt.Read More...
To clarify what the Longman editor meant, it is not that such sentences are ungrammatical. They are perfectly grammatical. But they are grammatical with respect to a meaning that the speaker did not intend. Analogously, the sentence "He punched him" is perfectly grammatical, provided that the referent of "him" is different from the referent of "he." It is ungrammatical if "him" is to refer to the same person as "he": He punched him. ≠ He punched himself.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

in 1973

1) “I think we’ve made our best album since Quadrophenia in 1973,” singer Roger Daltrey said in a statement to Rolling Stone . Source: https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/detail-first-album-13-years-161130863.html Quadrophenia was an album that came out in 1973. It was the only album by that name. The question is whether the sentence quoted in '1' is correct and, if it is, how should 'in 1973' be parsed? The meaning of the first sentence is: “I think we’ve made our best album since...Read More...
Wow! It is good to have DocV around! I had completely forgotten the soundtrack album! Thank you all very much! NaviRead More...
Last Reply By navi · First Unread Post

a long way

a. There is a long way to go for women to be treated equally with men. Can one say whether the women have to go that long way or society or....? Who is going to cover that long distance? Many thanks.Read More...
Hi, Azz, "for women to be treated equally with men" is an event, and the passive renders the first interpretation unlikely. I think the sentence can only be interpreted as meaning: - There is a long way for this to happen.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

best/the best

Which are correct: 1) We have a lot of colors to choose from. Which color would you say is best? 2) We have a lot of colors to choose from. Which color would you say is the best? 3) We could use one, two or three colors. One color is best. I don't care which one is used, but one color is best. 4) We could use one, two or three colors. One color is the best. I don't care which one is used, but one color is the best. Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Thank you very much, DocV, I thought that '4' might mean the same as '3' as well as being a self-contradictory statement. Apparently it has only one meaning and that meaning is self-contradictory. Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Last Reply By navi · First Unread Post

Use of hyphen

Which of the following is correct? 1) de-operationalize 2) deoperationalizeRead More...
Hi, Shivam Raj, That word is not in any dictionary that I know of, though I don't want to discourage you from using it. Prefixes can often be added to verbs. Both ways of spelling the word are correct, and there is another option as well. You could use a diaeresis above the o : deöperationalize.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Prepositions

Hi, Which is or are Ok? 1-"Many websites allow people to upload videos from their computers." 2-Many websites allow people to download videos from their computers."Read More...
Hello, Ahmed and DocV, I would think that we can use two other prepositions in context NO. 2; 2b: Many websites allow people to download videos on their computers. 2c: Many websites allow people to download videos onto their computers.Read More...
Last Reply By Hussein Hassan · First Unread Post

Prepositions

Hi, "Sara has got a new job. She works.........computers." A- with B- onRead More...
Ahmed, I'm sure I've seen this question before. Both are correct but they mean different things. (A) can mean that she does programming, editing, data entry, etc, and uses computers to facilitate her job. (B) means that she is a technician who builds and tests the computers themselves, repairs them, or performs maintenance on them. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

make life bearable

Hi, What does 'make life bearable' mean in this sentence? "To me, peanut butter is the only thing that makes life bearable." Thanks a lot.Read More...
Hi, Kuen, The speaker is saying that, to him, life would be unbearable without peanut butter. "Life" refers to the burdens of life, or to the burden of life itself. An unbearable burden is a burden that cannot be borne. "Make life bearable" here means "make an unbearable burden (or unbearable burdens) bearable." Grammatically, the structure is the same as the one we find in sentences like "He made it red," "She makes him happy," etc.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Using 'for' with time

Hello, In my area (in the UK) we regularly use 'for' as a preposition of time. For example, "Could you finish this for 5?" (as in, "Could you finish this by 5?"), a non-native English speaker corrected me and said 'for' can't be used as a preposition of time. I have tried to research this, but it seems like it's something that isn't technically correct. So, I'm wondering if this is just a dialect quirk of where I live, if it's a British English thing, or if this is actually correct but isn't...Read More...
Hello, Lauraaliali, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. I don't think the difference between "for" and "by" in adverbials of time indicating deadlines is a BrE/AmE issue. Both are correct but slightly different. While "for" introduces the due date on which some task needs to be completed, "by" means "no later than": - Could you finish this for 5? ( Delivery is expected to take place at 5.) - Could you finish this by 5? (Delivery is expected to take place anytime no later than 5, or at 5 at...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

The Devil spawn or Devil's spawn?

Hi there! I'm a bit confused and I need help with this. I've seen both "The Devil spawn" and "The Devil's spawn" Which one is correct or are both correct?Read More...
Sadude, Welcome to the Grammar Exchange. I can't help but wonder why this question should be so important, but I'll answer it anyway. "Spawn" here means "child" or "offspring", and as such needs a proper possessive: "the Devil's spawn". DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Countability of "turnover" and "income"

Hi everyone! Could you please explain to me in what sense "turnover" and "income" can be countable? Cambridge Dictionary gives the following examples of "turnover" use: "Large supermarkets have high turnovers (= their goods sell very quickly)." "The business has an annual turnover of £50,000." Would it be incorrect to say that large supermarkets have high turnover , and the business has annual turnover of £50,000 ? And here are examples for "income": a high/ low income additional / extra...Read More...
Thank you for your help anyway, Gustavo!Read More...
Last Reply By Alexey86 · First Unread Post

Ahmed was left (to dream - dreaming) about his new life as a teacher.

Hello. Which verb form is correct? Ahmed was left (to dream - dreaming) about his new life as a teacher. Thank you.Read More...
Hi, Ahmed Imam Attia, IMO, both are grammatically correct. Using 'dreaming', the emphasis lies on the progressive meaning, i.e. it refers to a present state then. Using 'to + inf.', the emphasis lies on something that would happen (in the near future).Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

They had been staying with us (since - for) the previous week.

Hello. In the following sentence, Which one is correct? If both are correct, what is the meaning of both? They had been staying with us (since - for) the previous week. Thank you.Read More...
Ahmed, 1: They had been staying with us since the previous week. Meaning: At the time of the event in question, they were staying with us, and had been since some time during the previous week. 2: They had been staying with us for the previous week. Meaning: At the time of the event in question, they were no longer staying with us, but had stayed with us the entire previous week. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

After I (got - had got) to the stadium, I realized that the match had already started

Hello. Which tense is correct or both? After I (got - had got) to the stadium, I realised that the match had already started. Thank you.Read More...
No, but using past perfect there would make the sentence unnecessarily heavy.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

he's seated

The following is an excerpt from the CNN News of August 28 about an autistic boy moving around in an airplane. Can "until he's seated" mean "until he was seated?" “That’s when a flight attendant came over and told us the flight couldn’t take off <until he’s seated>.”    “I told her the boy has autism, we’re trying, give us a minute.”  The flight attendant walked away, while Gabriel was still trying to keep the boy on his seat. She came back with two other flight attendants who asked...Read More...
Yes, Fujibei, it should be "until he was seated." The text mixes direct and indirect speech. After that clause, which being in the present clashes with "the flight could n't take off," we find something similar after "I told her..." It should be something like: I told her the boy had autism and we were trying so I needed her to give us a minute.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

locked in

Which are correct: 1) They got locked in. 2) They got locked in the storage room. 3) They got locked in in the storage room. Gratefully, NaviRead More...

checkered past

Hi, According to urban dictionary online, 'checkered past' means "bad history of someone due to unreputable actions from the previous years." Does it mean the person has a checkered past because he committed a crime before or not necessarily? Can it be used in a positive way? Could you please give me some examples of it? Many thanks.Read More...
Kuen, As the Urban Dictionary says, the person has a history of unreputable actions. Not just one action, but actions plural. They might not have been crimes per se ; they may have been acts of dishonesty or betrayal that were unethical but still within the law. The point is that because of his checkered past, you should take extra care when deciding whether or not to trust him. I can't imagine any way that this term could be used to mean something positive about a person. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

in or of

1. He wants to become a good writer in the world. 2. He wants to become a good writer of the world. 3. He wants to become the best writer in the world. 4. He wants to become the best writer of the world. Of 1 and 2, which is better? Of 3 and 4, which is better? Thanks.😀Read More...
Hi, Ruifeng, "in/of the world" does not make sense to me in (1) and (2). I'd just say: 5. He wants to become a good writer. Or perhaps you want to say: 6. He wants to become a (good) world-class writer. The situation changes if a superlative is used -- the adverbial specifies the limits of that superiority. We tend to use "of" to introduce a group and "in" to introduce a place. Thus, (3) is much better than (4). Now, see what happens if a group is used for reference: 7. He wants to become...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

morphemes

Hello, dear fellows; I am in doubt about this. I don't know if I can ask this question here, but that, you will let me know. How many morphemes make up the word 'imposition'? Someone told me this and i want to verify if it is correct not. It is formed by derivational and inflectional morphemes. Is this right?. Is there any other?. Thanks a lot for any help.Read More...
Eddy, Welcome to the Grammar Exchange. Your question is more about syntax than grammar, but I'll allow it. I think that it helps to have a working knowledge of Latin to understand some of this. There are at least three morphemes present: 1: posit This is a free morpheme as it is the root to which the other morphemes are attached. In Latin, it is the third-person singular perfect active indicative form of the verb ponere , "he/she put", or "he/she has put". 2: -ion This suffix is a...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

it is important for him

a. It is important for him to win the tournament. Does that mean 1. To him, winning the tournament is important. or 2. It is important that he should win the tournament. ? Many thanks.Read More...

it is important that

a. It is important that she comes here. Does that mean 1. The fact that she comes here is important. or 2. It is important that she should come here. ? Many thanks.Read More...
Azz, Only (1) is correct here. For the meaning to be (2), it would have to be: b: It is important that she come here. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Can I take out/get/withdraw

Hello~ I'm a Korean student who has been studying English for about 9 months. There are some questions. If I wanna get 1,300 dollars in a bank Can I say 'Can I take out 1,300 dollars? Can I get 1,300 dollars? or Can I withdraw 1,300 dollars?' Which one is more common used?Read More...
Thank you so much! It's really helpful for my English~ Have a wonderful dayRead More...
Last Reply By jonghun · First Unread Post

Is the present continuous "have been looking for" the wrong tense?

One of my non-native English speaking friends made up the example below. (1) For the last twenty-five days, I have been looking for an inexpensive stove in most of the local stores. Luckily, I bought one for a very low price at ABC. I think my friend is using the wrong tense being the present continuous because it suggests that his search for a cheap stove is still continuing. Since he purchased a cheap one, he has stopped his search. So, "have been looking for" would no longer apply. Do you...Read More...
Hi, ansonman, Yes, I agree. The past simple in the second sentence doesn't work here and doesn't go with the present perfect continuous in the first one. He could better say: After twenty-five days of a continuous search for an inexpensive stove, ........... .Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

"as hard as you can" vs "as hard as you could"

I have made up two similar examples below. (1a) John is a lazy student. He is not trying as hard as he can . My non-native English speaking friends think revised my second sentence to make (1b) below. (1b) .... He is not trying as hard as he could . My friends think "could" sounds better. I don't understand why they are using that. I think "can" is better because my entire example is in the simple present. What is your opinion? Thank you very much for your time and help.Read More...
Hi, Ansonman, The reason above does not justify the use of "can." In many present contexts, "could" can be used, for example: - I' m tired. Could you help me? The only difference I see is that "can" is more positive, while "could" is more remote: (1a) He is not trying as hard as he can . (The implication is: I know he can try harder, and perhaps he will.) (1b) He is not trying as hard as he could . (The implication is: If he wanted, he could try harder, but he's unwilling and therefore...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

I have been cheated five times when I was shopping ....

I have made up the sentence below. (1a) I was cheated five times when I shopped at ABC. My non-native speaking friends found two mistakes in my sentence. Their revised sentence is given below. (1b) I have been cheated five times when I was shopping at ABC. What confuses me in my friends' sentence is the use of the present perfect " have been cheated ". The fact that the store cheated me happened in the past when I shopped there. The present perfect makes the sentence sound like I am still...Read More...
Hi, ansonman, One thing is for sure, the use of the present perfect above is grammatically wrong . I prefer: I was cheated five times while shopping at ABC.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Do or win

We want to take part in the competition to (make-do-gain-win) something.Read More...
Hi, Ahmed55, My guess is that whoever made up this sentence has just done one thing: He looked up the definition of the word 'competition' on 'LDOCE' and found something called 'competition to do something', then he wrote the example above and used 'do' as a model answer, without -even- looking up the examples on 'LDOCE'. In fact, I see more than one correct choice here. What is that something ?! Normally, you take part in a competition to win it. If there are many prizes and you don't have...Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Is the when-clause an adjectival clause or an adverbial clause?

Hello, contributors. Is the when clause an adjectival clause or an adverbial clause? Then one afternoon when I was shopping at Diamantis Department Store , there he was standing in front of me. (from: Fit for Fate: A Tale of Byzantine Intrigue in Modern Athens ) Hoping for your explanation. THANK YOU.Read More...
They are all adverbial -- the "when"-clause provides a wider time frame, and the phrase "one day/morning/evening," a more restricted or specific one. In most of the cases, the order can be changed: - One day/morning/evening when I was ...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

infinitive usages. 2

Cars may be stuck in heavy traffic because there are no traffic lights to guide , and food goes bad in silent refrigerators. (Source: Iran's university entrance exam) Which usage of an infinitive has been illustrated here? 1. a direct object 2. subject complement 3. as a postmodifier after indefinite pronounsRead More...
Yes, without "them" the sentence is wrong because the verb "guide" requires an object.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Once I get 'em, they're got.

Hello everyone, John Dickinson : I trust, Caesar, when you're through converting the poor fellow to independency, you'll give the opposition a fair crack at him. Caesar Rodney : [chuckling] You're too late, John. Once I get 'em, they're got. source: https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0...characters/nm0534577 (In fact I saw them in a video, though they are the same with the linked text.) What do the parts in bold mean? I am having a hard in figuring them out. Many thanks in advance.Read More...
Got it. Thank you.Read More...
Last Reply By Mengxin_2009 · First Unread Post

things like you did

1) He did things like you did. Can '1' have both these meanings: 1a) He did things as you did. He did things in the way you did. 1b) He did things like the ones you did. ================= 2) He said things like you did. Can '2' have both these meanings: 2a) He said things as you did. He said things in the way you did. 2b) He said things like the ones you said. ================= 3) He said things like you said. Can '3' have both these meanings: 3a) He said things as you did. He said things in...Read More...
Thank you very much, David, Very interesting. Sentence '1' strikes me as a very rare specimen. It can have two meanings. That is of course no big deal. But if we assume that its meaning is '1b', then there will still be a 'grammatical ambiguity' (I am using that for want of a better word). One can't tell whether the second 'did' is an auxiliary verb or not! The sentence be parsed in two ways. I suspect that the speaker would know which 'did' he or she used, but the listener won't be able to...Read More...
Last Reply By navi · First Unread Post

relative clauses

China is the country that paper, silk and gunpowder were first produced in . China is the country which paper, silk and gunpowder were first produced in . China is the country in which paper, silk and gunpowder were first produced. China is the country where paper, silk and gunpowder were first produced. To me, the second one is wrong. What do you think? (Source: Iran' university entrance exam.)Read More...
Hi, Freeguy, Please number your examples the next time. All four sentences are correct. The second and third sentences are essentially the same sentence. In the second, the preposition is stranded; in the third, it is fronted. That said, I do find the second sentence to be the least natural of the four.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

modifying problem

Hello forum, Then I discovered, what was news to me , that his wife was Tom's niece. What section does the underlined part modify? a). (that)his wife was Tom's niece. b) Then I discovered that his wife was Tom's niece. I think it modifies b), the whole sentence. If the sentence is reworded as " Then I discovered that, what was news to me , his wife was Tom's niece", then the underlined part may possibly modify the clause section. And I also think it is a general way to identify what an...Read More...
Thank you, David, for making that clear. I think I should also clarify that "which was news to me" in end position also refers to the "that"-clause, being a clausal rather than a sentential modifier: - Then I discovered that his wife was Tom's niece, and this (the fact that his wife was Tom's niece) was news to me.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

"Will buy" vs "going to buy" vs "buying"

Hi there, could you please tell me which ones are correct in the following sentences? Are there any difference in meaning? 1-Hey John, I am buying a mobile tomorrow. 2- Hey John, I am going to buy a mobile tomorrow. 3- Hey John, I will buy a mobile tomorrow. And........ 4- Hey John, I will get a new car tomorrow. 5- Hey john, I am going to get a new car tomorrow. 6- Hey john, I am getting a new car tomorrow. And..... 7- Let me look into the matter, I am having a discussion with James...Read More...
Concerning the usage of the future tenses, I see that all the sentences above are grammatically correct. With 'will', there is determination and willingness. With 'be going to', there is a strong intention. With the present progressive, emphasis is on arrangement. I mean something like calling the car agency and making an appointment with the manager to buy a new car or getting the money from the bank to buy it.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

away from

1) That was three years away from his graduation from high school. 2) That was three years from his graduation from high school. 3) He was three years away from graduating from high school. 4) He was three years from graduating from high school. Can one tell if 'away from' and 'from' mean 'before' or 'after' in these sentences? Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Hello, Navi, As a native speaker of American English, I understand "away from" as ambiguous between "before" and "after" in (1) -- I can get either reading -- and as indicating only "before" in (3). As for the sentences with just "from," I understand (2) as ambiguous between "before" and "after" -- I can get either reading -- and as unidiomatic in (4). However, if I had to specify a meaning in (4), it would be "before."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

the tulips most prized for their uniqueness

Hi, everyone. Please do me a favour. Some say " most prized" in the context above is the superlative of the adjective of “prized”. Others say " most" is an adverb meaning extremely and that " prized" is a past participle . I want to know your opinion about this question. Thanks.Read More...
Thank you, GUSTAVO. I am sorry to have paid TOO much attention to "I don't see much contradiction ..."Read More...
Last Reply By sunshine · First Unread Post

Is the TV title “2 Broke Girls ” correct

Hello, everyone. Sorry to bother you again. According to Merriam-Webster's Advanced Learner's Dictionary and The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) , when “broke” serves as an adjective, it should not be used before a noun. So my question: Is the TV title “2 Broke Girls ” correct? (2 Broke Girls is an American television sitcom that aired on CBS from September 19, 2011 to April 17, 2017. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2_Broke_Girls )Read More...
Docv, thank you sincerely.Read More...
Last Reply By sunshine · First Unread Post

had almost

1) He had almost written the letter. Could '1' mean both: 2) He had almost finished writing the letter. and 3) He almost wrote the letter. (but didn't even start writing it) Gratefully, NaviRead More...

the usage of 'impossible'

I wonder if the conversion below is allowed. It is impossible for them to carry the box. -> The box is impossible for them to carry.Read More...
Hello, yy, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! I find your first sentence above to be more usual, but I don't think the other one is incorrect, but just awkward or less straightforward, if we consider that these two sentences are fine: - It is impossible for me to do this. - This is impossible for me to do. In the second case, I feel tempted to add something to complete the sense of "do," for example: - This is impossible for me to do on my own / by myself.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Issue with 3rd person verbs in a list on resume

Hello all, question for you. I’m turning the first entry of my resume from past tense to present tense/3rd person tense. It’s been easy to change except that the first sentence (underlined section) is really giving me a hard time, because it sounds awful to the ear in 3rd person. I’m looking for other suggestions/possibilities. Thanks in advance for any help. I’m turning “ Researched, analyzed, and interpreted policies and procedures , made final decisions on post-entitlement actions, and...Read More...
"Analyzes" sounds fine to me. What don't you like about it? DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

she's been tranced and may need waking.

Hello, everyone. Please do me a favour. I have trouble understanding the following sentence. she's been tranced and may need waking. (https://www.lexico.com/en/definition/trance) My questions: 1. What does the word "tranced" mean? 2. How to paraphrase the sentence? I would appreciate it if you could give me an explanation.Read More...
DocV, thank you very much. I am from China, me an English learner and lover.Read More...
Last Reply By sunshine · First Unread Post

to keep the talking at library tones

Hello, everyone. Would you please do me a favour? “Of course, you are still encouraged to keep the talking at library tones and, whatever you do, keep the information you share simple, like a grocery list. ”(from: http://www.kekenet.com/cet6/201712/535779.shtml ) My questions: What does the writer mean by “ at library tones ”? Is the preposition “at” in the phrase “at…tone” correct? I think the appropriate preposition should be “in”.Read More...
Thank you, DAVID. Your explanation really helps.Read More...
Last Reply By sunshine · First Unread Post

have some time getting it out

Hello, everyone. Please do me a favour. My questions: 1. Why did you author use "getting" instead of "to get"? 2. Is it correct to replace "getting" with "to get"? If so, is there any difference? I expect to have some time getting it out. We heard today for the first time of the peace talk. I am not putting any faith in it at all and I guess it is just our business to ... (from A Canadian's Road to Russia: Letters from the Great War Decade by Stuart Ramsay Tompkins, ‎Doris Hinson Pieroth -...Read More...
Got it. Thank you, GUSTAVO.Read More...
Last Reply By sunshine · First Unread Post

had not the entrance been spotted by the distinguished French potholer, Berger.

Hello, everyone. Would you please do me a favour? The cave might never have been discovered had not the entrance been spotted by the distinguished French potholer, Berger. (New Concept English book 3 by L.G. Alexander) My question: Is the word order “had not the entrance been” correct in the sentence above? To be exact, is the position of the word “not” correct? I was hoping someone give could me an explanation. Thank you very much.Read More...
Hi, Sunshine, I've had to check this with David, because -- familiar as I am with several of L.G.Alexander's books -- I was not sure myself. In US English, the structure above is not ungrammatical but is considered extremely unnatural and unidiomatic, and possibly even archaic. If inversion needs to be used, it is much safer to say: - The cave might never have been discovered had the entrance not been spotted by the distinguished French potholer, Berger. Surfing the Internet, I have found...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

What light is to the eye, that knowledge is to the mind.

Hello, everyone. Would you please do me a favour? I have trouble understanding the word “that” in the following sentence. What light is to the eye, that knowledge is to the mind. [from Henry Cowles : The Revelation of John (1871)] My questions are as follows: Is the word “that” is a determiner or a conjunction? What does the word “that” refer to? What is the predicative in the part “that knowledge is to the mind”?Read More...
Thank you very much, GUSTAVO.Read More...
Last Reply By sunshine · First Unread Post

He's always game for a laugh. (from Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English, entry: game (adj))

Hello, everyone. Would you please do me a favour? He's always game for a laugh. (from Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English , entry: game (adj)) My questions: Is the word “game” an adjective or a noun? What is the meaning of the word “game”? How to parse the sentence “He's always game for a laugh”? I would appreciate it if you would give me an explanation.Read More...

"Will buy" vs "going to buy" vs "buying"

Hi there, could you please tell me which ones are correct in the following sentences? Are there any difference in meaning? 1-Hey John, I am buying a mobile tomorrow. 2- Hey John, I am going to buy a mobile tomorrow. 3- Hey John, I will buy a mobile tomorrow. And........ 4- Hey John, I will get a new car tomorrow. 5- Hey john, I am going to get a new car tomorrow. 6- Hey john, I am getting a new car tomorrow. And..... 7- Let me look into the matter, I am having a discussion with James...Read More...

as between

Hello, everyone. Please do me a favour. 1. What does the phrase "as between" mean in the context? 2. Is it correct to replace "as between" with "between"? If so, is there any difference? The context is as follows: The house, which she could see was going to be burned to its bones before any help could reach it, was the summing up of her life. Logically included in the slant of its roof, its closet spaces, its lonely distance from the village, was everything that had ever happened to the...Read More...
Thank you very much, GUSTAVO . It really helps.Read More...
Last Reply By sunshine · First Unread Post

the effects on these of viperine poison is almost immediate

Hello, everyone. Would you please do me a favour? Snakes did not acquire their poison for use against man but for use against prey such as rats and mice, and the effects on these of viperine poison is almost immediate. ( from New Concept English, book 4 by L.G. Alexander ) I wonder why the writer has used the word "is" instead of "are". I was hoping you would give me an explanation. Thank you.Read More...
GUSTAVO , you are great. Thanks very much.Read More...
Last Reply By sunshine · First Unread Post

bully vs. bullier

a. A lot of these tough, cool guys are bullies of weak people. b. A lot of these tough, cool guys are bulliers of weak people. Which is grammatically correct? I don't think (a) works. As 'bully' is a verb, I'd say 'bullier' is a legitimate word, and we need that word in this context. I'd vote for (b). It is possible that neither is really grammatically sound. One could always go for c. A lot of these tough, cool guys bully weak people. But I'd like to emphasize what they are . Their identity...Read More...
Hi, Azz, Unfortunately, "bullier" is not a word in the English language. It does not appear in the OED. To me, it sounds as if it were the name of a type of dog. My vote is for (c), the sentence with the verb "bully." If you must go with the noun, I recommend using "to" instead of "of" (d) A lot of these tough, cool guys are bullies to weak people. I have confirmed that this usage exists -- e.g.: "We treat our patients with respect and compassion, yet we are bullies to our coworkers" (...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

This is the first time for me to go to London.

Hello, everyone. Please do me a favour. Oxford dictionary says this sentence is not correct. This is the first time for me to go to London. I wonder why. I was hoping you could give me an explanation. Thank you.Read More...
Yes, Ruifeng, we can use either "to" or "in" there, and with "to" there is more of a dynamic feel, a sense of the speaker's having taken a trip to London. In that context, I'd use "This is the first time I've taken a trip to London", a sentence which also works in the first context you asked about.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

seemed hurt by

1) He seemed hurt by your comment. 2) He seemed annoyed by my presence. 3) He seemed annoyed with my presence. It seems to me that all three sentences are correct. Am I right? Is there a difference between the meanings of '2' and '3'? These sentences are about feelings. Is there any other case where 'seem + past participle+by+agent' is used? Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Navi, To me, (4), (5), and (6) seem correct. If in doubt, insert "to be" after (seems/seemed). DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Do you like to

Hi, What's the difference between these sentences below? 1. Do you like living in the city? 2. Do you like to live in the city? 3. Did you like living in the city? 4. Did you like to live in the city? Thank you very much.Read More...
Hi, Kuen, A Practical English Grammar (Thomson and Martinet) 4th edition says: This means that both 'ing' form and 'to+ inf.' could sometimes be used interchangeably without a great difference in meaning. So, in answer to your questions about the listener and the speaker, I see both your suppositions are perfectly fine. However, they are not strict (fixed) rules to follow. Suppose I live in the city and my friend says: - After witnessing this human misery, do you still like to live / living...Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

She was telling me about her exploits while travelling around Africa.

Hello, everyone. Please do me a favour. I have trouble analysing the word "while" in the following sentence. She was telling me about her exploits while travelling around Africa. (from Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary ; entry:exploit) Some say: While-clause is an adjectival clause modifying "exploits". Others say:her exploits while travelling around Africa=her exploits done/achieved while travelling around Africa. That's to say, while-clause is an adverbial clause modifying the...Read More...
GUSTAVO , thank you very much. Your explanation really helps.Read More...
Last Reply By sunshine · First Unread Post

How can this be grammatically correct? What's wrong with Britain's young royals?

Hello everyone, Am I crazy or is this organization title all mucked up grammatically. Everyone is all fired up about the pedantic decrees Megan and Prince Harry keep boring us with. Let them say whatever, but at least show a command of standard written English. Am I crazy or doesn't this title need a comma--badly--after Sussex Royal and before its subsequent descriptor phrase? Pulled this from Vanity Fair copy, but I've see the charity's name written like consistently. Say it isn't so?Read More...
Hello, Lizzie, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! Names of organizations do not readily accept commas, even if desirable in other contexts (as in phrases containing a noun and an apposition). I think the only commas that are commonly accepted are the ones appearing before Inc. and Ltd. in the names of companies. Note: Sorry, David. I just saw your reply. We seem to have been writing our answers at about the same time.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Diagramming

I would like to ask if anyone on this site has heard of sentence diagramming, if so, what is their opinion of it as a learning tool?Read More...

mixed 2/3 conditional?

“This is the biggest difference between you and me: I’m just someone who faithfully carries out orders. You, you’re someone who always has to ask why.” “Is that wrong?” “It’s not about right or wrong. If everyone had to be clear about why before they executed an order, then the world would have plunged into chaos long ago” Excerpt from The Dark Forest Cixin Liu Hi. How should I understand the underlined sentence? Is it just a normal mixed 2/3 conditional, as in “If I were you, I would have...Read More...
Hi, Zuotengdazuo, IMO, there is nothing wrong here. Yes, it is a mixed conditional 2/3. As you see, the speaker's present attitude is completely against the idea of asking 'why' before executing an order, so he uses type 2 counterfactual in the present and connects its imaginary results with type 3 counterfactual in the past. A thief -after becoming rich- would say: If I had morals, I would have never made my fortune.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

excited about

1) I am really excited about the movie 'Wind' coming out in September. 2) I am really excited about the movie 'Wind' in September . 3) I am really excited for the movie 'Wind' coming out in September. 4) I am really excited for the movie 'Wind' in September. The idea is that I am really excited that the movie 'Wind; is coming out in September. Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Thank you very much, DocV, That makes perfect sense!... As usual!! Respectfully, NaviRead More...
Last Reply By navi · First Unread Post

something you know

a. You must have done something that hurt your wife's feelings terribly. Now, you might not even know what it was. Or maybe, it is something you know but seems unimportant to you. b. You must have done something that hurt your wife's feelings terribly. Now, you might not even know what it was. Or maybe, it is something you are aware of but seems unimportant to you. Are both of the above grammatically correct? Many thanks.Read More...
Azz, I have no problem with (b). I would change (a) to: a1: You must have done something that hurt your wife's feelings terribly. Now, you might not even know what it was. Or maybe, it is something you know about but that seems unimportant to you. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

from September to April

a. From September to April, I caught colds three times. b. From September till April, I caught colds three times. c. Between September and April, I caught colds three times. Which of the above sentences are grammatically correct and meaningful? Many thanksRead More...
Azz wrote: That's actually not true. If a castle's guards are defending an attack on the north wall, the other three walls are more vulnerable to attack. This is also true of your body's immune system. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

In spite of usage with gerunds

I have been asked to explain why the sentence 'in spite of snowing, we went out for a walk.' is not correct. I would say 'in spite of the snow we went out for a walk' but I was reminded that this is a prepositional phrase and it can be followed by a gerund, which is true in many instances, but I'm not sure why this sentence is not correct. It certainly doesn't sound correct.Read More...
That is really nice, David. You're definitely right, David. I added it after writing the other, less awkward "In spite of it snowing," but -- fascinating as it may look -- this one went too far, I'm afraid.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Reflexive vs object pronouns. 2

It is the first time we are going to travel to the south and we don't know what to take with ourselves and which road to take. .... As for the common usage of reflexive pronouns, I think "ourselves" is wrong here, and it should be "us". Correct me if I am wrong, please.Read More...
Explaining why a reflexive pronoun does not work well in a prepositional phrase in such a sentence is not easy. I know of a doctoral dissertation on the topic. It's interesting that the reflexive pronoun does work in the variation " We don't know what we are going to do with ourselves / ?* us ." The reason may have to do with its being impossible for people to TAKE something with anyone other than themselves. The reflexive is unnecessary. In contrast, it is obviously possible for people to...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

a factor that most workers have attributed to nutritional stresses of postweaning diets.

By and large, however, most reports on age patterning in hypoplasia occurrence indicate a peak in defects at 2 to 4 years of age, regardless of geographic or ecological setting, a factor that most workers have attributed to nutritional stresses of postweaning diets. from: https://mafiadoc.com/the-cambr...97c4706398b457d.html Hello, everyone. Please do me a favour. 1. What does “a factor” refer to, according to the text? 2. What is the meaning of “have attributed a factor to nutritional...Read More...
Thank you very much.Read More...
Last Reply By sunshine · First Unread Post

this one, these ones

Hello, 1. I like this one, but I don't like those. 2. I like this white one, but I don't like the red ones. 3. I like this one here, but I don't like the ones on the shelf. 4. I like this small one, but I don't like those big ones. 5. I like this one, but I don't like those ones. Sentences 1,2,3,4 all sound OK, but not 5. The "those ones" doesn't sound right to me. I've been wondering why. "those " and "ones" mean almost the same , so using these two words side by side sounds funny. Is there...Read More...
They are not ungrammatical? I didn't know that. Thank you, DocV appleRead More...
Last Reply By apple · First Unread Post

holding a sword

1) I took a picture with John holding a sword. 2) I took a picture with him holding a sword. 3 ) I took a picture with John, holding a sword. 4) I took a picture with him, holding a sword. In which sentences I am in the picture? In which sentences John is in the picture? In which sentences I am holding the sword? Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Thank you very much, DocV, … And John chased him with the sword and …. Respectfully, NaviRead More...
Last Reply By navi · First Unread Post

short in this group but not in that

Which are correct and is there a better way to say it: 1) He is short among the boys in his class, but not among both the boys and the girls in his class. 2) He is short compared to the boys in his class, but not compared to both the boys and the girls in his class. 3) He is short among the boys in his class, but not among all the children in his class including the girls. Gratefully, Navi .Read More...

Is this sentence grammatically correct?

I was wondering whether the sentence “I am cool and vape” is grammatically correct. Vape is a verb in this situation. Is “am cool” a verb? If so, would it parallel to “vape” since it is also a verb? Would the “I” carry over due to the parallel structure? I need answers.Read More...
MissT, Hey, watch that about "unepic boomers". I represent that! I understand that you signed on for just the one question. I hope you'll be back though. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

structure: since

Hello, The objective, since attained, was to create a set of contractual rules that would establish uniformity in that practice, so that practitioners would not have to cope with a plethora of often conflicting national regulations. What is the grammar of "since attained"? What has been omitted and what does it mean? Many thanks in advance.Read More...
Yes, DocV, that makes sense now. I've even found it as a restrictive clause, and the absence (perhaps objectionable) of the commas makes the adjectival interpretation even clearer: - The objective since attained was to create a set of contractual rules that would establish uniformity in that practice, so that practitioners would not have to cope with a plethora of often conflicting national regulations. ( https://www.fimbank.com/en/new...es-ucp-600-awareness )Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

you'll be surprised

1) You'll be surprised by what he said. 2) You'll be surprised what he said. I think both are correct and mean exactly the same. I also think that '2' is acceptable in informal English. It seems to be that it is an elliptical version of '1', but the ellipsis is not governed by any grammatical rule. Am I correct? Gratefully, NaviRead More...
I agree with you, Navi. I've heard both constructs used commonly, as well as these: 3: You'd be surprised by what he said. 4: You'd be surprised what he said. I'd say that all four are definitely acceptable in informal English. I think that, in formal writing, I would prefer (1) or (3), but I wouldn't go as far as to call either incorrect. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Prepositions

When can a prepositional phrase modify the object of another preposition? Can anyone offer a clear explanation?Read More...
Raymond, This is true. When the new format was imposed on us, our moderator David felt that he, Gustavo, and I, as well as several other members, were distinguished scholars to the extent that the "like" feature of Facebook and Mickey Mouse Club culture was beneath the dignity of this forum. I am in complete agreement with him. I speak for all of us though, when I say that we appreciate it when you take the time to write "thank you". Unfortunately, although we have managed to get the "like"...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

What does "Here There Be dragons" mean?

The following is an excerpt from the August 12 New York Times. What does the headline “Here There Be Dragons” mean? Here There Be Dragons. But Can They Survive an Invasion of Tourists? KOMODO NATIONAL PARK, Indonesia — The Komodo dragon, a 10-foot lizard native only to a scattering of islands in Indonesia, flicked its forked tongue. Two boys were standing nearby, the perfect size for dragon snacks. A local guide shrugged at their unease and urged them closer to the reptile. Komodo dragons...Read More...
To add to David's comments, the use of "be" instead of "are" can be considered either dialectical or archaic. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

versions differ by tenses

I have made up the example below. (1) ABC Store is a very popular online business for overseas buyers. However, according customer reviews, customers are complaining about why they are required to pay a high customs duty when they receive their orders. My non-native English speaking friends think the present tense I use in this context is wrong. They have suggested three ways to revise my example. (2) ..... However, according customer reviews, customers have complained about why they are...Read More...
Anson, I agree with you about (4). I also see a tense discrepancy in (2). (1) and (3) are grammatical, except for a missing "to" after "according". Also, the double reference to "customers" is distracting. What about this: 5: However, reviews show that customers have been complaining about having to pay a high customs duty when they receive their orders. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

[as] or [for] their wedding gift

I have made up the example below. (1a) My best friend and his girlfriend will get married soon. I am planning to make something special for their wedding gift. My non-native English speaking friends think I am using the wrong preposition. Their choice is given below. (1b) ..... I am planning to make something special as their wedding gift. Which preposition is correct? Thank you very much for all your time and help.Read More...
Thank you, Gustavo. I was trying to avoid the redundancy of using both "give" and "gift" (forms of the same word) in the same sentence. You've offered some excellent options. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

If there was communication between them,

“I’ll make it simple. Grandmother had to go out, so she left the children in the house, telling them they must make sure the door is shut and not to open it to anyone but her. On the road, Grandmother met a wolf, which ate her, and then put on her clothing and assumed her appearance. Then it went to the house and came up to the door, and said to the children, ‘I’m your grandmother. I’ve come back. Open the door for me.’ The children looked through the crack in the door and saw what looked...Read More...

are to, shall, should, have to

May I know which of the following sentence is more common used or appropriate ? Is any of them ungrammatical? 1. All answers are to be written in black or blue ink. 2. All answers shall be written in black or blue ink. 3. All answers should be written in black or blue ink 4. All answers have to be written in black or blue ink.Read More...
Hi, Joshua, All of the sentences are OK, and none of them is ungrammatical. As for the most natural, commonly used, and appropriate modal construction here, I recommend one that you have not used: "must." 5. All answers must be written in black or blue ink.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

[a custom-made jewelry item] or [a custom-made jewelry]

I have made up the example below. (1a) My grandmother will be celebrating her eight-fifth birthday in one month. I want to order a custom-made jewelry item for her birthday gift. My non-native English speaking friends revised the phrase in bold, as shown below. (1b) ... I want to order a custom-made jewelry for her birthday gift. I don't see anything wrong with my original phrase. Who is correct? Please help me. Thank you very much for your time and help.Read More...
Hi, Ansonman, I join DocV in disliking (1b) intensely. The reason (1b) is incorrect is that jewelry is a noncount noun. You can speak of a jewelry item, a jewelry store, or a jewelry piece. However, you cannot speak of a jewelry , and adding adjectives won't help.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

𝗱𝘂𝗽𝗹𝗶𝗰𝗮𝘁𝗲 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗼𝗯𝗷𝗲𝗰𝘁

Hello, 𝗺𝗮𝘁𝗲𝘀, Could you tell me your 𝗼𝗽𝗶𝗻𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗮𝗯𝗼𝘂𝘁 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗳𝗼𝗹𝗹𝗼𝘄𝗶𝗻𝗴 𝘀𝗲𝗻𝘁𝗲𝗻𝗰𝗲: 𝐻𝑒 ℎ𝑎𝑠 𝑎 𝑙𝑜𝑡 𝑜𝑓 𝑚𝑜𝑛𝑒𝑦 𝑡ℎ𝑎𝑡 ℎ𝑒 𝑑𝑜𝑒𝑠𝑛'𝑡 𝑘𝑛𝑜𝑤 𝑤ℎ𝑎𝑡 𝑡𝑜 𝑑𝑜 𝑤𝑖𝑡ℎ 𝐼𝑇. 𝗜𝘀 𝗶𝘁 𝗿𝗶𝗴𝗵𝘁 𝘁𝗼 𝗱𝘂𝗽𝗹𝗶𝗰𝗮𝘁𝗲 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗼𝗯𝗷𝗲𝗰𝘁?Read More...
Thank you, Ahmed, both for your effusively complimentary welcoming, and for your clarification of Abo Hamza's original post. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

"...met by..." OR "...met with..."

What is best? "They were on the steps of the Chambers and were met with Fidelity’s personal bodyguards." OR "They were on the steps of the Chambers and were met by Fidelity’s personal bodyguards." Thank you.Read More...
Yes, I am writing my first full-length book. I completed 4 of 5 chapters and so far it is about 125 pages in length. It is a dystopian science fiction that takes place in the future, a future in which men are no longer needed to procreate due to the perfection of human cloning. It is really a parable centering around themes of majority vs minority groups in society and issues of individuality, especially judging others as individuals.Read More...
Last Reply By kingdada1 · First Unread Post

such as

1) Great novelists such as Joyce and Faulkner used the interior monologue. 2) Great novelists like Joyce and Faulkner used the interior monologue. 3) Great novelists, such as Joyce and Faulkner, used the interior monologue. 4) Great novelists, like Joyce and Faulkner, used the interior monologue. Do the first pair mean the same as the second pair? Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Thank you very much, DocV, It is good to see you back! Respectfully, NaviRead More...
Last Reply By navi · First Unread Post

Present perfect

What is the right answer : Nothing like this (happened - has happened - has ever happened - has never happened) to her.Read More...
Hello, Emad, I agree with Ahmed_btm that "has ever happened" is a very natural choice, and it is probably the answer that the test makers would like you to choose. However, there is only one incorrect (ungrammatical) answer in the answer set, and that is "has never happened": Nothing like this happened to her. (correct in a suitable context) Nothing like this has happened to her. (correct in a suitable context) Nothing like this has ever happened to her. (correct and very natural) * Nothing...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Simplify past perfect to simple past in a type 3 conditional?

“The Daily News observed that there was no doubt as to the crime being a political one. The despotism and hatred of Liberalism which animated the Continental Governments had had the effect of driving to our shores a number of men who might have made excellent citizens were they not soured by the recollection of all that they had undergone.” A Study in Scarlet Hi. Does the bold part refer to the past, so the bold part is equivalent to “ had they not been soured...”? In other words, it is a...Read More...
Thank you, Doc V.Read More...
Last Reply By zuotengdazuo · First Unread Post

I have made up [an/the] example below.

Suppose that you are giving a Powerpoint presentation on the relationship between addition and multiplication using your computer. You are now showing the next slide with an example. You are going to say this next. (1a) To show this relationship, I have made up an example below. 4 x 3 = 4 + 4 + 4 My non-native English speaking friends think the indefinite article is wrong because I am talking about the specific example below. So, they revised it to make (1b) below. (1b) To show this...Read More...
Nice analysis, Gustavo. I agree with everything you have said and would simply like to add that another natural way of saying "I have made up the example below " is to say "I have made up the following example ." Right here on the Grammar Exchange, I have written sentences like "Please consider the following example" probably thousands of times. Ansonman, if you really want to use "an," you could say: I have made up an example, namely, the example that appears below. But there is no need for...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Hyphen question

Which is correct? ”Fill out the department-requested form.” or ”Fill out the department requested form.”Read More...
Hello, JenH, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! The pattern agent + past participle is only used in English when the agent is a generic, plural noun, as in: - moth-eaten clothes (clothes eaten by moths ) or an institutional, singular noun (of which there is only one of the kind), as in: - state-owned company (company owned by the state ). The noun "department" does not belong to either of those categories. I'd express the sentence you propose as follows: - Fill out the form as requested by...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

placement of an adjective in "a piece of paper"

I have made up a few similar examples. I am going to write them out below. (1a) I am going to take some notes. May I borrow a scrap piece of paper from you? (1b) I am going to take some notes. May I borrow a piece of scrap paper from you? (2a) I am going to take a lot of notes. May I borrow a large piece of paper from you? (2b) I am going to take a lot of notes. May I borrow a piece of large paper from you? My non-native English speaking friends cannot help me because they are not sure.Read More...
Thanks, Gustavo. I had been rather minimal in my response, but you have provided an excellent explanation of why our preferences work and the others don't. A piece of [a] large cake could actually be very small! DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

disagreement

Hi everyone, I want to ask how a native English-speaker agree/disagree on a idea both in formal or casual ? For example I have found that "Go along with something" is a way to support an idea. In addition, it would be great if you introduce me a reference in order to find collocation. Thanks in advance,Read More...
Hi, Leonard-Jones, Please see if this can be of help.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post
×
×
×
×