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Future simple or present continuous?

"When he finishes his exam, he ...........to London." A- will travel b- is traveling I think "is travelling" is correct as it shows that he has arranged to travel to London, but I have never seen a present simple and a present continuous in one sentence.Read More...
Please see my comments in this thread .Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

present continuous or be going to

Hello, teachers I found this question in an outside book "not a school book" __ He has filled up the bucket with water. He ........the car. ( a- is washing / b- is going to wash). My choice is "is going to". As far as I understand, both the progressive form and be going to are sometimes interchangeable (when they express the future). Yet, the present continuous implies arrangements while the "be going to" form refers to intentions or decisions in addition to "present reality". That's why I...Read More...
Thanks a lot, sir. I see eye to eye with you. I didn't like sentence either. I was asked to give my opinion about it, that's why I preferred asking yours.Read More...
Last Reply By ayman · First Unread Post

shoulders is/are

Hi all, I just wanna make sure. "Shoulders are the target." Is this correct? Or is the target or, i dont know, somehow i have doubts evn though it is easy. I just hear ppl using is even when plural, and you cannot always explain it with an existed rule. Thank you.Read More...
Aria, Welcome to the Grammar Exchange. I can't think of an instance where I would ever say "shoulders are the target". If you are talking about shooting, I would say "aim for the shoulders". I could imagine saying: 1: My shoulders are the source of the pain. This is a similar construct to your example in that we have a plural subject linked to a singular predicate noun, and the verb agrees in number with the subject. But if we reversed the two, I would say: 2: The source of the pain is my...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Reply by Former Member

Sorry I deleted the post since you had asked Ahmed A

Reply by David, Moderator

"Will" does work, Tara, especially since it would seem that this sentence is being spoken before the race. Thus, it seems to be making...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Freeguy, Yes, "to" is functioning as a preposition there; "taking notes when reading" is a gerund phrase that is functioning as the...
David, Moderator

to as a preposition?

Learning to take good notes is very important. Good notes can help you remember and review a text you have read. There is no magic formula to taking notes when reading.You have to find out what works best for you. (Source: Iran's English Coursebooks) I wonder why we have "taking" (a gerund) after "to". Is this "to" a preposition? I've checked a couple of dictionaries. The common combinations are: (1) formula for: a formula for the withdrawal of US forces from the sea (2) formula that: There...Read More...
Thanks.Read More...
Last Reply By Freeguy · First Unread Post

Reply by David, Moderator

Hello, Mrtkrdmn, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! Unfortunately, it is ungrammatical in English to use clauses as objects of...
David, Moderator

Reply by Freeguy

>>Since we do not know, as readers, how resolute the speaker is about not eating sweets, we can't tell how remote a possibility...

Reply by David, Moderator

Thank you for your input, Ahmed. Let me expand a little on my one-liner above. When I said that both answers were correct, I didn't mean...
David, Moderator

plural and singular used in the same sentence

Hello, I was reading THE KANSAS CITY STAR, which I suppose is an American online paper. I came across an article where the following sentence appeared. “I do find that the victims in this case, in particular, were more an aggressor than a participant in the criminal conduct,” My question: “the victims” is a plural, (two young girls). Is it acceptable to use a singular “an aggressor, a participant” to refer to the girls? Or is it not problematic because an aggressor in this case means just...Read More...
Thank you so much, David, for elaborating on my question. You went so far as to search other sources. What a respectable expert! I really appreciate your answer. It made everythihg very clear. appleRead More...
Last Reply By apple · First Unread Post

Reply by ahmed_btm

Hi, Freeguy and David, Of course, I don't mean to contradict David's answer here, particularly he - as a native speaker - sees things...
ahmed_btm

Using on condition that and provided that in conditional sentences

Is it correct to say: Michael could go to the theatre on condition that / provided that he was home by six. Or these two expressions(on condition that/provided that) are only followed by present tenses in conditional sentences?Read More...
Mr Bendary, I completely agree with David's answers, in regard to the questions you actually asked. However, I'm not entirely sure that what you asked was really what you meant to ask. 1a: Michael could go to the theatre on condition that he was home by six. 1b: Michael could go to the theatre provided that he was home by six. Both of your examples refer to events or states in the past. What Michael is allowed to do today doesn't enter into it. If we want to talk about what Michael wants to...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post
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