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Reply by tara

Re: will
Thank you very much

Reply by David, Moderator

Re: will
Hi, Tara, Yes, "would" could have been used instead of "will" there. Both are OK. "Would" would have given the sense of a Type 2...
David, Moderator

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Freeguy, I agree with the answer key. Given those two choices, (2) is the only option that works. It would also be OK to use the...
David, Moderator

past perfect

I am sorry that I _____ before I _____ the explanation. 1) had stopped – finished 2) stopped – had finished Answer key: 2 The PAST PERFECT TENSE indicates that an action was completed (finished or "perfected") at some point in the past before something else happened. What I understand is the first action is "stopping" and the second is "finishing". So, why not #1?Read More...
Hi, Freeguy, I agree with the answer key. Given those two choices, (2) is the only option that works. It would also be OK to use the simple past in both clauses: 3) I am sorry that I stopped before I finished the explanation. Additionally, we could reduce the "before"-clause such that it would have a nonfinite verb phrase with an implied subject: 4) I am sorry that I stopped before finishing the explanation. If we're using a finite "before"-clause, though, the past perfect works particularly...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Reflexive vs object pronoun

Hello, Micheal Swan believes after prepositions of place , we often use a personal pronoun (me, you etc) if the meaning is clear without a reflexive. Compare: (1): She took her dog with her. (NOT ... with herself.) (2): They divided the money among them. (NOT ... among themselves) (3): Close the door behind you. However, I wonder why the following, although using a prepositions of place, is correct: (4) He placed his little dog beside himself on the couch. As a matter of fact, I don't know...Read More...
It means that each case is different, so you will have to decide which pronoun to use according to the specific circumstances.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Reply by tara

Re: will
Hi Why is "will" used? Can't it be "would"? "Therefore, you decide that, after interviewing each applicant, if that applicant is better...

Odd or something

Q1: When we describe a figure or number between 20 and 30, we can say twenty odd or twenty something. Are there any other expressions with similar meanings? Q2: Do we need to add a hyphen ie twenty-odd, twenty-something? I guess the use of a hyphen is optional. Is it true? Q3: Is the above use confined to any particular use only? For example, in the use of an approximate age of a person, is it restricted to twenty something or, in other words, can “xxx something”, in fact, be used in any...Read More...
Many thanks, DocV.Read More...
Last Reply By terry · First Unread Post

"the" before the superlative

Hello, I was reading a multiple choice quiz on the following URL. http://global.oup.com/us/companion.websites/9780190270995/stud/ch1/mcq/ Question No.9 asks, Which of the following is closest to the meaning of “Sartori's Ladder of Abstraction”? Don’t we need “the” before “closest” the superlative? Is this a simple typing error? In question 3, “the” is before “best”. Which of the following is the best social scientific question?, BTW, the title of this page says Mutiple Choice Quiz, but it’s...Read More...
By the way, Apple, please notice that "the" is optional in (d).Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Reply by egyptian2017

Thank you so much David The model answer is " would walk " , but like you ,I tend to use " would have walked " .

Reply by David, Moderator

Hi, Egyptian2017: That's an interesting question. Although I am a bit more partial to "would have walked" ("Without looking where he was...
David, Moderator

less number / a less number of people

Hussein Hassan
Hello, there, Would you please help me? Which one/s of the following sentences is/are CORRECT? You should have hired less number of people because too many cooks spoil the broth. You should have hired a less number of people because too many cooks spoil the broth. You should have hired a few number of people because too many cooks spoil the broth. You should have hired fewer number of people because too many cooks spoil the broth. Many thanks ...Read More...
Greetings, all. First of all, let me say that I am in complete agreement with Gustavo. I find all of Mr Hassan's examples unequivocably ungrammatical. I would find his example "•" (as opposed to his other examples, "•", "•", and "•") acceptable if "less" were changed to "lesser". The word is not commonly used except in certain set phrases (eg, "the lesser of two evils"), but because of such phrases it is commonly understood. Mr Hassan, was there something in particular that made you not want...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Without

Without looking where he was going , the man ......... into a tree . ( would walk - would have walked )Read More...
Frankly, I don't like either option. They are grammatical, but I can't imagine any native speaker of English phasing a conditional that way. David's examples "If he hadn't looked ... " and "If he didn't look ... " are much more natural. The only option that works for me is simply "walked": Without looking where he was going, the man walked into a tree. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

is finishing; has finished

As the term ________ next week, the school will hold a special assembly for all students. a. is finishing b. has finished _______________________________________ from a Korean English book Are they both correct? Thanks!Read More...
Hi, Kis, No, they are not both correct. The "as"-clause would make no sense with the present perfect, which refers to the past. Something in the past can't be in the future ("next week"). With "is finishing," the "as"-clause is ambiguous in meaning. It could mean that the fact that the term is coming to a close is the reason for holding the assembly, or that the assembly will be held while the term is coming to a close.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Stative passive vs participial adjective

http://www.victorianlondon.org...kens/tale-0006.shtml "Good day!" said Monsieur Defarge, looking down at the white head that bent low over the shoemaking. It was raised for a moment, and a very faint voice responded to the salutation, as if it were at a distance. Q1: Is “it was raised for a moment” a stative passive rather than a participial adjective? If I add the word “very”, “it was very raised for a moment” does not sound right. Hence, “it was raised” is not a participial adjective. Q2:...Read More...
Thanks, Gustavo.Read More...
Last Reply By terry · First Unread Post
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