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Adverbial phrase

1. That disease afficts some people in a contaminated area while sparing many others . Does the italicized portion modify the bold one--contaminated area?Read More...

Some/any

Hello. I am so embarrassed to ask this,but I need to confirm it. " Some people skate even in summer." When we ask about this sentence with Yes/No question, "Do any people skate even in summer?/ Do some people skate even in summer?", Which of them is correct? I think "Do some people~?" is correct, but some people say that when "some" is in a sentence,we have to put "any" in place of "some" in the question. Is it really correct? In my point of view,"any people" means anybody, and "some people"...Read More...

Nouns ending in "-y"

Hi all: Here's a question that's always intrigued me: why does the word "city" when it's pluralized, change its y to i before adding -es but not "Mary"? The grammar reference make a vague reference that if a y is preceded by a vowel, the y converts. OK is that because the y is considered a vocalic y (i.e. y is treated as a vowel) In any case, I would like to know about the historical background as to why "city" changes y to i+es in plural but not "Mary." Thanks! xavierRead More...

"We entering"?

Is the following sentence correct? It's getting hotter now that we entering June. Can a prounoun "we" be a subject of a participial construction? appleRead More...

What's wrong with this picture?

The Grammar Exchange spotted this sentence in a daily newspaper of a large North American city: "And, make sure your child knows that tissues must be thrown away immediately following hand washing in a trash receptacle." RachelRead More...

One of the men who "enjoy" or "enjoys"?

Please take a look at the sentence (1). (1) Tom is one of the few young men who enjoys golf. Is "enjoys" not "enjoy"? My understanding is that " the few young men" is plural and "who" refers to "the few young men", thus "enjoy" without an S. There are not many, but some young men who enjoy golf, and Tom is one of them. appleRead More...

"Will" or "going to"?

On another forum, it was discussed whether going to + verb and will + verb could be equal in usage in the eyes of the speaker. The example sentences were: I'm going to get you a doctor. I'll get you a doctor. Below are my thoughts on why we use the (be) going to example. Do you think the same could apply to will+ verb? I wonder if, when choosing to say "I'm going to get you a doctor.", we can follow the general explanation associated with the form (be) going to : The future is an...Read More...

Coordination and Comparative Clause/Phrase

I somewhere read that there exist similarities between Coordination and Comparison. I appreciate if somebody demonstrate which one of the following is correct using coordination test. 1. Failure to advertise as prominently the highest price in a range of prices for a service or product as the lowest 2. Failure to advertise the highest price in a range of prices for a service or product as prominently as the lowestRead More...

Past or past perfect?

I heard that Jean (just moved , had just moved)into a nice condominium overlooking the lake. Which is correct? If both are correct, is there any difference in meaning? thanksRead More...

Let's...

I found the following sentences from CNN: If you are a younger couple without a lot of assets, a joint account can work well. This let's you build together from the ground up . Jeff Opdyke, author of "Love & Money," calls this "financial intimacy." I first thought there was an error mistyping let's for lets here. However, when I did a search in google, I found a number of examples using let's when lets should be called for. I wonder whether this use of let's is grammatical. Thank youRead More...

Modifier

Which one of the following is gramatically correct? 1. Traveling the back roads of Hungary, in 1905 Béla Bartók ]began his pioneering work in ethnomusicology. 2. Traveling the back roads of Hungary in 1905 , Béla Bartók began his pioneering work in ethnomusicologyRead More...

Psychological immediacy

Does any one feel that (1) below is more psychologically immediate for the speaker? Or is there no difference between the choices? (1)I'm going to Africa next year. (2)I'm going to go to Africa neat year. N.B: (2) is the auxiliary (be) going to + verb.Read More...

Conditionals

Dear all, Scenario : 2 teachers, A and B, talking about a student who gave a poor presentation.. A to B : "If he were my student, I would sit him down and go through the presentation with him to show him where he went wrong." - 2nd conditional. Could A have also said : "If he were my student, I would have sat him down and gone through the presentation with him to show him where he went wrong." - mixing the 2nd conditional (If he were...) with the 3rd conditional ( I would have ... ) What is...Read More...

Acceptable translation?

Dear experts, Would you say that the apparently translated piece of prose below is acceptable English to be used as a quotation: Tadek shivered at a thought of a sudden storm in such conditions as they were right now, so vulnerable! He would not like to stir up a net of hornets. Or to wake snakes either. Thank you, YuriRead More...

Mindbending grammar

They either arrive in Thursday, or they arrived last night-though originally they arrived on Saturday next. OK in spoken English?Read More...

Semantic relevance of the article?: "in charge of" and "in THE charge of"

Dear experts, Would you confirm that we may only say: be in charge of something - be in control of smth.; responsible for smth.: As is the custom with elevator-boys, the lad in charge of the elevator started it before closing the door. but not: BE IN THE CHARGE OF SOMETHING. Whereas we say: be in the charge of someone - be under the care or supervision of a person: She has been in the charge of her grandmother since her mother and father died. but not: BE IN CHARGE OF SOMEONE, or are the two...Read More...

An expression: "walk the plank"

Dear experts, Could you comment on the METAPHORICAL, FIGURATIVE meaning of the expression WALK THE PLANK, whose original literal meaning relates to murder by drowning. Thank you, YuriRead More...

Punctuation and ellipsis in a complex sentence

The following sentence stumped me. Is there any ellipsis in the second clause? 1. It would not show that some people have not survived, and in good health, for twelve years after having been infected.Read More...

"For" and "to"

Hello. could you please tell me about the difference between "for" and "to" in showing direction? 1)I have to take my sister to the zoo. I go to school. I got to the station. 2)This is for you. The bus's leaving for Kyoto. I bought them for Christmas. And do they show direction? Thank you. poobearRead More...

Scope

1. Psychologists have advocated that parents discipline male children as they would daughters. 2. Psychologists have advocated that, as they would daughters, parents discipline male children. In 2, the scope of as-clause lies within that-clause, whereas in 1 it can extend to main clause. Your comments/corrections are appreciated.Read More...

Synonymous phrases: "knowing ...answers" and "knowing....tricks"...?

Dear experts, How would you differentiate between: know all the answers know all the tricks of the trade People who are successful in one field should be careful about suggesting they know all the answers in other areas. I could tell by the way he directed his helper, that he knew all the tricks of the trade. Thank you, YuriRead More...

Heading for the hills

Dear experts, Are both of the expressions below current in US English? How would you differentiate their meanings: go over the hills and far away head for the hills Winter in the Highlands is not a time to go over the hills and far away, not if you have any sense. In the smaller cities, better accommodations can be found for half the price of Prague hotels. So head for the hills as soon as you can break yourself away from Prague. Thank you, YuriRead More...
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