All Forum Topics

shocked about / shocked by

Hi.. Which of the two sentces is correct? 1)I was quiet shocked about the way she reacted. 2)I was quiet shocked by the way she reacted Is it shocked about or shocked by ? thanksRead More...

sofa vs couch

What is the difference in usage and meaning of sofa vs. couch? I have one of them for sale. Both categories are listed in the publication I want to advertise in. How do I decide which category to put it in?Read More...

ABLE or CAPABLE

Dear Marilyn, Many thanks. How about ABLE vs. CAPABLE; do they share only one meaning in common? Can we represent the distinction as follows: able adj. – 1. (followed by ˜to' plus an infinitive) having the power, means or opportunity to accomplish an action: able to get a grant 2. especially talented; skillful: an able teacher 3. expertly done; effective: He presented an ABLE speech even though he had just a few minutes to prepare for it. capable adj. – 1. = able 2. 2. (followed by ˜of' plus...Read More...

'At, On, In' his job?

Dear Readers: One of these sentences is going to appear in an upcoming English product. Which sentence sounds most natural to you? 1) The taxi driver doesn't get a lot of exercise IN his job. 2) The taxi driver doesn't get a lot of exercise ON his job. 3) The taxi driver doesn't get a lot of exercise AT his job. Thank you! RachelRead More...

Agreement of subject and verb

The Net in my school insisted that the following sentence is correct: 'Let's make a monkey's eyes.' Is it grammatical? Can we have 'a' and eyes at the same time?Read More...

ABILITY or CAPABILITY?

Dear experts, Would you agree that the two paronyms share one meaning in common and may be represented as: ability n. – 1. suitable or sufficient physical or mental power to do something well. 2. (often pl.) mental capacity; talent, cleverness. capability n. – 1. = ability 1. 2. a talent that has potential for development or use (often pl.). 3. the capacity to be used, treated, or developed for a specific purpose. 4. (usually pl.) an undeveloped faculty, physical or otherwise, capable of...Read More...

"The" without Preposition Phrase

tommy
1. when i saw the tiger on the hill, i ran away. Can i use "the" without proposition phrase "on the hill" ? 2. when i saw the tiger, i ran away. how difference between the two sentences? and Is it the same tiger in the two sentences? very thank youRead More...

When, After, Before Explanation

tommy
1. When i saw the tiger, i ran away. 2. When i had seen the tiger, i ran away. 3. After i saw the tiger, i ran away. 4. After i had seen the tiger, i ran away. 5. I had seen the tiger before i ran away. 6. I saw the tiger before i ran away. which one is correct, which one is wrong? and what's difference in detail each sentence please? very thank you *note: i think all the sentences are acceptable. but i don't know which ones are formal writing please?Read More...

Future time clause

Hello I happened to find the question which I think is strange. Would you look at this? I should choose the words in the parenthesis. #1 Children (are sleeping / sleep / will be sleeping ) by the time I get home. I think there is not appropriate answer in the parenthesis because of " by the time I get home." Is that right? If I use "will be sleeping", what should I change this part? Is #2 or #3 OK? If it's not, would you give me some sentence that make sense? #2 Children will be sleeping at...Read More...

At ease & at home

Hello, teachers! Would you tell me which verb is correct and natural, please? 1. Let go of it and have a drink. It will put/make you at ease. 2. Try this pillow. It will put/make you at home. And how about these variants? 1a. Let go of it and have a drink. It will make you feel at ease. 2a. Try this pillow. It will make you feel at home. Thank you very much. Best Regards.Read More...

want - hope 2

Hello I found the following sentence in the grammar exercise. #1 I hope my daughter to be an artist. I think " hope " should be " want", because " hope" cannot follow a person as an object or " hope" should fallow that-clause. Is this right? I'd like to know if #1 is grammatically right or not. Thank you.Read More...

Follow-up (WATCH OUT FOR SOMETHING)

Dear Marilyn, Many thanks. How do the three meanings of the expression WATCH OUT FOR you mentioned, correlate with those of WATCH FOR and LOOK OUT FOR, i.e. do they overlap and to what extent? Gratefully, YuriRead More...

advertising/advertisement

What is the difference between these two sentences: 1.The advertising of tobacco is outlawed. 2.The advertisement of tobacco is outlawedRead More...

infinitive or bare verb

1. She did nothing but cry. 2. We had no choice but to cut back on wholesale costs. In 1, the verb "cry" takes a root form, but in 2, the verb "to cut" is infinitive. Why is this so? Are a root form of the verb "cut" or a gerund "cutting" also acceptable? Apple.Read More...

Like -ing vs. like to

Hello, teachers! Do you have any preference between gerunds and to-infinitives with the verb "like"? I was taught that these are equally correct and common. However, IMHO, there is difference in nuance and preference. Moreover in BrE, there is a distinct difference in meaning and in usage, I think. Am I right? 1-1. I like swimming. [This is better, isn't it?] 1-2. I like to swim. 2-1. I like swimming when it's hot. 2-2. I like to swim when it's hot. [This is better, isn't it?] Thank you very...Read More...

fruit

Which one is correct? My favourite fruit is mango. My favourite fruit is the mango. My favourite fruit is mangoes. My favourite fruits are mangoes.Read More...
1. I am interested in this book. 2. This book interests me. 3. This book is interesting . - I'd like to know that all the sentences are grammatically correct? and which one is the most formal writing? - All the sentences have the same as meaning? - Can i write it as I'm interesting in this book . ? and - " interesting " on sentence3 is an adjective right? ThanksRead More...

A pair of bell-bottoms

Hello, teachers! Would you please tell me which is natural with the phrase 'a pair of', plural or singular? 1. I bought [a pair of] bell-bottoms at a low price, but, [they were] damaged. 2. I bought [a pair of] bell-bottoms at a low price, but, [it was] damaged. Thank you very much. Best Regards.Read More...

Visiting professor/teacher

Dear experts, Would you agree that VISITING PROFESSOR and VISITING TEACHER mean altogether different things. Thank you, YuriRead More...

"watch out for": opposite meanings?

Dear experts, Would you agree that the expression WATCH OUT FOR SOMETHING may be used to convey two opposing meanings: 1. be on guard for smth. dangerous or undesirable: I'm always watching out for mistakes that I may have missed before. 2. a positive statement meaning try to find or partake of something. Thank you, YuriRead More...

Near vs. close to

Hello, teachers! Please help me with the difference between 'near' and 'close to'! 1. After the accident Paul didn't go near a horse for two years. 2. After the accident Paul didn't go close to a horse for two years. - A native speaker (Englishwoman) says that both are correct, but we much more prefer #1 to #2. Is it true? If it is true, would you please tell me what difference in meaning makes the preference? Thank you very much. Best Regards.Read More...

Where to go

What does the "where to go" mean in the following excerpt from "Wal-Mart's Gender Gap" by Lisa Takeuchi Cullen Wilson, taken from Time, July 5, 2004: When she learned that a man she had trained was earning $3,500 more than she was, " they told me it was a fluke." But as other male colleagues leapfrogged past, her salary never rose above $60,000 and she never landed the promised job of store manager. When she complained, "they told me where to go," says Adams, 57. She quit at the end of 2001.Read More...
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