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Past Cont vs Past Simple

The following sentence is our textbook as an example for the passive. Radar was being used for the first time, to help planes to land. Why didn't they use ( Radar was used for the first time, to help planes to land.)Read More...
Hello, Rasha, We use the progressive in the passive voice in the same types of circumstances in which we use the progressive in the active voice. The progressive allows us to talk about what is or was happening at a certain time or time period. The comma before "to help planes land" tells us that the main point of the sentence is that it was the first time radar was used at all. The fact that it was to help planes land is a parenthetical detail. I don't know whether you have access to the...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

To Submit/Submitted

ahmad
Hello, everyone, Do the following mean the same? 1. It is to submit that the report is baseless. 2. It is submitted that the report is baseless. Thanks.Read More...
Hi, David, Sir, you helped me to grasp the difference. Thanks. PS: However, the intervening period has given rise to a further question which I will be posing soon.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

Present or future

She suggested that he ....fishing tomorrow and he liked the idea. ( would go - go - going - will go)Read More...
Hi, Ahmed55, Yes, "will go" is incorrect. You have titled this thread "present or future," but "go" is not the present tense here. It is the present subjunctive . The common alternative to using the present subjunctive in a clause complementing "suggest" is to use "should" + [base form]. She suggested that he go fishing tomorrow and he liked the idea. She suggested that he should go fishing tomorrow and he liked the idea.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

How much and when you drink coffee is important.

Hi! I have some questions about this sentence: (1) How much and when you drink coffee is important. https://learningenglish.voanews.com/a/coffee-may-help-you-live-longer/3112147.html I find the sentence (1) interesting. I would imagine that If "how much" were not connected with "when" in the sentence, "coffee" would be placed right after "how much" as in the sentence (2a) below: (2) a. How much coffee you drink is important. b. How much you drink coffee is important. Am I right so far? I am...Read More...
Thank you so much, Gustavo! I agree your sentence (5) is better than (1). The sentence (1) may be a less preferrable form, but it can be considered grammatical, which I think is interesting.Read More...
Last Reply By yasukotta · First Unread Post

Tenses

Before you mentioned about him, I ………….. of that novelist. (hadn’t ever heard- haven’t ever heard)Read More...
I agree with your tense choice, Ahmed. "Mention" is normally a transitive verb. That seems to be the motivation for your revision to "Before what you mentioned about him." Webster's dictionary doesn't even list an intransitive usage. But I do recognize it, and it's fairly common among native speakers. The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) devotes a fair amount of space to it. I'd describe this intransitive usage as normal but a bit informal.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

transitioning for a career change

I am planning to have a career change. I went to see an employment counselor about that. He is not a native English speaker. When he saw me, he said, (1) "Are you transitioning for a career change?" Is it correct to use "transitioning"? Thanks for your help and time.Read More...
Hi, Ansonman, "Transition" can be used as a verb, and the verb is sometimes used in the progressive. But that sentence makes no sense. Perhaps he was trying to say: (1a) Are you planning to make a career change? (1b) Are you transitioning into a new career? (1c) Are you going through a career transition?Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

didn't, hadn't or haven't

Suppose that I stopped shopping at a particular store for about two years. I shopped there again last week. This is what I am going to say to my friends. (1) I hadn't shopped at Great Savings for two years. When I bought things there last week, I was surprised by how expensive its merchandise is now. (2) I didn't shop at Great Savings for two years. When I bought things there last week, I was surprised by how expensive its merchandise was . (3) I haven't shopped at Great Savings for two...Read More...
Hello, Ansonman, Your friends are correct in this case. Let me know if there is an issue here that you wish to explore in more detail.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

take a rest a few times

I have made up an example below. (1) Yesterday, I spent quite a few hours walking hour kilometers. During my walk, I was very tired and had to take a rest a few times. Is it correct to say "take a rest a few times"? Thank you for your help and time.Read More...
Hi, Ansonman, No, we don't say "take a rest." We do, however, say "take a break." You could say: I was very tired and had to take a few breaks. I was very tired and stopped to rest a few times.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

2 Synonyms in 1 Sentence/ A comma before "and"

Hi everyone, I’m wondering whether it looks well-written and, most importantly, grammatically correct to use 2 synonyms at once in my following sentence: If it looks well-written and is grammatically correct when the audience read it, do you recommend me using a ‘comma’ after ‘muscle cells’ to prevent it from sounding too long for a sentence? Original Quote: Thank you!Read More...
Hello, Blue_Delta_47, Please note that you should refer to relative clauses as being restrictive or non-restrictive . Both types of clauses, restrictive and non-restrictive (or defining and non-defining) are relative or adjectival. I liked your examples about the lions. You main question seems to revolve around this: The answer is yes (provided we understand that you refer to "non-restrictive" clauses, that is, those set off by commas). They do add extra information, and that extra...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Use "if" not "when"

Hello. In the following sentence, I think that we cannot use "when" instead of "if", right? - If you answer this question, you have a good brain. Could you please give more examples of "use if, not when? Thank you.Read More...
I'd like to add something to this historical answer given by the Longman editor. Even though the main clause of conditionals like "If you get this answer right, you have a good brain" refers to the present, there is an implicit element of futurity. Notice that the "if"-clause ("if you get this answer right") does refer to something in the future. At the present time, it is unknown whether "you will get this answer right." If you do, then the conclusion will follow. Therefore the real meaning...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Tenses

Although the police suspected him, he was able to prove that he (was working /had been working) when the crime was committed. What is the right answer in this sentence?Read More...
Hello, Emad, Both answers are right. Because of the adverbial "when the crime was committed," the past perfect is not needed to show that the working occurred further back in the past than "was able to prove." But the past perfect is also correct. The fact that the past perfect isn't necessary doesn't mean you shouldn't use it. And if you think the test makers believe (mistakenly) that the past perfect is needed, it would be prudent to use it.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

I want to watch "the" football

I heard people say in the UK "I want to watch the football." Is it correct? If it is, did they mean they wanted to watch "the" football as in a specific football match hence the use of the article "the"? Thank you.Read More...
Hello, Jeff2019, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! What was the context in which you heard people say that? Did they say it once? If so, what was happening in the surrounding extra-linguistic context when they said it? Did they habitually say it? If so, what were the circumstances in which it was habitually said? Answers to the above will help us to ascertain the meaning. Once we know the meaning and the context, I will be able to tell you whether the usage is correct in American English.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

now, now that, so

Hello, Of the following 4 sentences, is 2 correct? I don't think so, because "now that" is a conjunction, so a comma before "let's" is OK, but "Now" is not a conjunction, so the first sentence has to be an independent sentence. What about 4? Is a comma ok? or does it have to be a period? Now that everyone is ready, let's get started. Now everyone is ready, let's get started. Now everyone is ready. Let's get started. Now everyone is ready, so let's get started. AppleRead More...
Thank you so much, David. You gave me the very answer I needed. appleRead More...
Last Reply By apple · First Unread Post

before meeting him

a . He talked to me at four o'clock before meeting Jim. b. He talked to me at four o'clock, before meeting Jim. c. He mentioned your case in his second conversation with me before the last time we talked. d. He mentioned your case in his second conversation with me, before the last time we talked. e. He mentioned your case in his second conversation with me, that is, before the last time we talked. Which of the above sentences are grammatically correct? Which are natural? Do (a) and (b)...Read More...

Historic or historical

I'm totally get confused about the usage of historic and historical. These two different screen shots make the matter more confusable!Read More...
Hi, Mr Ahmed, You mean to say either " I'm totally confused about the usage of historic and historical" or " I get totally confused about the use of historic and historical." You mean they make the matter more confusing to you. The distinction between "historic" and "historical" has been discussed many times on GE. See this thread: https://thegrammarexchange.inf...storic-vs-historicalRead More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Respected Or respectable

My friend had a ........... position in the medical profession.Read More...
Hi, Mr Ahmed, Please put your question in your post. Initially I had no idea what you were trying to ask. Then I looked at your title and was able to infer what you intended your question to be. The reader should not have to work so hard to find the question. The answer is "respectable." The individual being spoken of had a position in the medical profession that was worthy of respect . That's what "respectable" means. Whether or not people actually respected the position, it was worthy of ...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

John standing

Which are correct: 1) I saw somebody in the distance. When I drove up I realized it was John standing there in a state of shock. 2) I saw somebody in the distance. When I drove up I realized it was John, standing there in a state of shock. 3) I heard a shout. I turned around. It was John running towards me like a madman. 4) I heard a shout. I turned around. It was John, running towards me like a madman. 5) I heard someone shout. I turned around. It was John running towards me like a madman.Read More...
Hi, Navi, Proper names are the most specific of all nouns and, as such, will not normally take a defining or restrictive clause. That said, I find (2), (4) and (6) to be much better than the others. I also find (6) to be superior to (4), where the thing described (the shout) is defined by means of a person (the shout was not the person, but came from the person). The person-person connection is clearer in (6): - I heard someone shout. It was John , running towards me like a madman.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Is this sentence correct?

Hello, I have never seen such a beautiful beach like this. This is the most beautiful beach I have ever seen, No other beach is as beautiful as this (one). I have never seen anything like this beautiful beach. I think sentences 1,2,3, mean about the same, but what about 4? Is 4 correct in the first place? If not, what's wrong with it? If correct, does it mean the same as the other three sentences? AppleRead More...
Thank you, David, always. appleRead More...
Last Reply By apple · First Unread Post

Is or are

My sister asked why the sky (is - was)blue.Read More...
Hi, Ahmed55, Both "is" and "was" are correct. You can take your pick. with backshift : My sister asked why the sky was blue. without backshift : My sister asked why the sky is blue. You don't need to backshift with eternal truths, but backshift isn't forbidden with them, either. The sky isn't always blue, I realize, but it is when there is daylight and there are no clouds or any other conditions clouding the view of the sky.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post
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