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two green and one red box/es

Hello, I am having trouble finding the rule for the usage of plural or singular in the following sentences: 1. There were two yellow and one red card/s awarded. 2. Two yellow and one red card were/ was awarded. I feel like in sentence 1 - "There were two yellow and one red card awarded" is correct, and in sentence 2 - "Two yellow and one red card were awarded" is correct. Grammarly accepts both plural and singular in both sentences. Please, please, can anyone name the rule for these examples...Read More...
Hello, Nico, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! "Were" is the verb that is needed, and you should say "one red card." It is ungrammatical to say * one red cards . "Two yellow and one red card" means "Two yellow [ cards ] and one yellow card." That is a plural noun phrase. We use plural verbs with plural subjects in English.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

One

Do we say "one should do his/her/their jobs well."Read More...
Hello, Emad, I agree with Ahmed_btm that the best choice is "one's," and it is not listed. In old-fashioned English, "his" was used as a generic singular pronoun. In modern feminist English, "her" can be used as a generic singular pronoun. If you use "his" or "her," however, you must change "jobs" to "job." Indeed, you need to change "jobs" to "job" even if you use "one's": One should do one's job well.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

acres of land is/are

570 acres of land ______ filled with gardens and cycling paths. a. is b. are Are they both correct? Is 'acres of land' singular or plural? Thanks!Read More...
Hi, Kis, Yes, they are both correct. The singular represents the 570 acres as one piece of land. The plural represents the 570 acres as 570 individual units of land.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

grammar

Dear teachers, what is the difference between house and home? Another question :- Must any English teacher know all idioms? Thanks a lot.Read More...

Paraphrasing the sentence

Can you explain this sentence please :"There were so many people that I didn't know who was doing what."Read More...
Hello, Emad, The "that"-clause relates to "so." As a result of there being a lot of people there, you didn't know who was doing what. "Who was doing what" is an embedded question with two wh-elements and is functioning as the object of "didn't know." You didn't know the answer to the question "Who is doing what?" (i.e., Who is doing this?, Who is doing that?, etc.). Q: Who is doing what? I can't tell. / I can't tell who is doing what. A: John is shaking Mark's hand. Joan is setting the...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Past Perfect

Hello, everyone! As far as I understand, the most important function of past perfect is to refer to ' earlier past '. However, when I found the following sentences, I couldn't undertand the usage of past perfect, since the action of past perfect tense in the main clause obviously occurred later compared to the action of past tense in the subordinate clause. Since I have often seen such sentences with above unexpected past perfect, I wonder if natives might have the usage that they use...Read More...
I'll appreciate, if I could hear your explanation for my last question in the following post, when you're convenient; https://thegrammarexchange.inf...pic/seems-like-as-if Thanks in advanceRead More...
Last Reply By deepcosmos · First Unread Post

Past Perfect 2

Hello! I'll appreciate, if anyone could explain me the usage of past perfect in the following sentence, since the past perfect, I assume, is unusually refering to ' later past '. "The frustrated interrogator was not going to give up easily. “Are you both still working in the company?” Barbara, appearing not the least disturbed by the woman’s incontinent insistence, scooped the last cherry out of her dish, smiled , looked directly at her, and said in the identical tone of voice, “We’ve...Read More...

Decompose "I have something important to tell you"

Hi everyone, I heard this on a film and when I try and decompose it using sentence diagramming I get stuck trying to define what each word's function is. Is it possible someone define each each word please? The sentence: "I have something important to tell you." The movie was: Conspiracy Theory; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...piracy_Theory_(film) Many thanks, PhilipRead More...
Thank you David. It is deeply satisfying reading your answers.Read More...
Last Reply By Philip · First Unread Post

Tenses

What is the right choice in this sentence :"l (knew /had known) him for ten years when he died in 2000.Read More...
Hello, Emad, The past perfect is the correct choice in that sentence. To see this, it may help you to see the sentence with the "when"-clause fronted: When he died, in 2000, I had known him for ten years. I have set off "in 2000" with commas because the phrase is nonrestrictive. He only died once, and that was in 2000.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Will you want

We are going for a walk. Will you want to come with us? Is it natural? (I would say: Do you want ... or Will you come ...?)Read More...
Hi, Freeguy, That question is not natural. I'm assuming that the time of the walk is to be in the fairly immediate future. Your other questions are OK, but "Will you come with us?" is a request, whereas "Do you want to come with us?" is a friendly invitation. Here's what I would use: We're going for a walk. Would you like to come with us?Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

"Scientist won’t discover/won’t have discovered all of these species for hundreds of years."

HELLO. Could you please help me with this item as I think both future forms are OK? What do you think? "Scientist won’t discover/won’t have discovered all of these species for hundreds of years." Thank you.Read More...
It is already used in our book as an MCQ! It is the first question written on the page you attached! The question is mentioned with its model answer circled in blue. It is mentioned three times in the same unit, so there is no way to choose 'won't discover' here.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Find the mistake

'Is Ahmed ok? He seems so nervous.' 'Yes, he keeps arguing with all his classmates.' "Find the mistake, correct it then explain it."Read More...
Thanks David! Yes, I don't think that the problem is on "OK" but rather in "yes" itself! There was an opinion saying that we should use a coordinating conjunction instead of "yes" especially they didn't mention speaker A or B. So it is considered as rhetorical sentence! I still don't get it!Read More...
Last Reply By Sarah Robeen · First Unread Post

grammar

Is it okay if I say " I will help you cleaning the hall" ?Read More...
Hi, Ramadan Mohammed, and welcome to our forum. Hussein's answer is very good. Another preposition you can use with the gerund is "by," but the meaning will be different: I'll help you by cleaning the hall. Unlike the other sentences Hussein provided, this does not mean that "I" and "you" will clean the hall together. Instead, "you" will clean the hall by him/herself and will thus help "I," who will be devoted to some other task.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Me and my vs my and my

Hi everyone, newbie to the forum and have a question. I would naturally say "me and my partner´s dog" but I have doubts as to whether the gramatically correct way would be "my and my partner´s dog", though this sounds very strange when I say it aloud. I know that it is more polite to say "my partner and I" but that sounds even stranger "my partner and I´s/me´s/my dog" Which is the correct way? Apart from saying "our dog" Thsks in advanceRead More...
Thanks for the clarification David cheers 😜Read More...
Last Reply By zevvy · First Unread Post

first conditional

1. If she smiles more, people will like her. 2. If she smiled more, people would like her. The above sentences come from "Oxford English Grammar Course." The latter works for me. However, I cannot think of a context in which the first fits. Can you expand the first one for me?Read More...
Many, many thanks. What about this version: She's getting ready to begin a presentation and she's nervous about that. People are talking about "her" and decide that she'll be more likeable if she smiles. .... I know that here, "she would be more likeable if she smiled" is not correct. But I wonder if the above sentence sounds natural to you.Read More...
Last Reply By Freeguy · First Unread Post

very much a...

Hi, What is the difference between 'He is a loner' and 'He is very much a loner'? Thanks.Read More...
Hi, Kuen, "He is very much a loner" is simply an emphatic version of "He is a loner." The version with "very much" sounds very strange outside of context. Here is a context in which the version with "very much" would work: A: Is he a loner? B: Oh, yes! He is very much a loner.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Passive voice. 1

1. Who was that book written by? 2. By whom was that book written? Are both correct? Thanks.Read More...
Hi, Freeguy, I agree with Sarah that both are correct. Although it is possible to say, "Whom was that book written by?," most people would not say that, because it sounds stiltedly formal. So it would be silly to say that the version with "who," which almost everyone would use instead, is incorrect. On the contrary, it's fine. Why not use the active voice? You could simply say: " Who wrote that book? "Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Seems like (as If)

Hello, everyone! Very glad to meet you here. 1. He seems to be happy. 2. It seems that he is happy. (formal style) 3. It seems like ( as if ) he is happy. (informal style) 1. Sentence #1 ; I assume that ' to infinitive ' functions as subject complement (that is, subject + intransitive verb + subject complement). 2. Sentence #2, 3 ; I assume that 1) ' it ' functions as extraposed it to set up 'end focus', 2) the conjunctions - ' that ' and ' like ', ' as if' in informal style - lead not a...Read More...
Many thanks for your reply, Mr.David. I will really appreciate, if you let me know how you analyze above that , like ( as if ) clauses in (2), (3) as a subject complement or a real subject , since it has been a difficult problem to me for long. Best RGDS,Read More...
Last Reply By deepcosmos · First Unread Post

Preposition or No Preposition

ahmad
Hello, everyone, 1. He used the pen gifted him by his father to sign his maiden contract. 2. He calculated the money spent him by his family. Are these sentences correct? If yes, what is the underlying structure? Thanks.Read More...
Hello, Ahmad, "Indirect object" is a term that is used in different ways by different grammarians and textbook authors. I use "indirect object" in reference to the first NP object in what they are calling the double-object construction. I, too, use "double-object construction" instead of "indirect-object construction," but I tend to do so only in my private thinking about grammar or when talking to linguists. I use "indirect-object construction" when teaching learners. The other construction...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post
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