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than ~

In this sentence: A special feature of the real estate rental market is its tendency to undergo a severe and prolonged contraction phase, more so than with manufactured products. Q. Can you please explain me how this kind of sentence stucture in red highted is possible? So far, I only know that only clause or noun comes after 'than'. Are some words omitted in above sentence after 'than'? If so, what would be the rule for omission after 'than'? Thank you so much for your kind reply!Read More...
Thank you so much!Read More...
Last Reply By vegnlove · First Unread Post

disadvantage vs difficulty

Thank you always! I'd like to know how to use "disadvantage" in the sentence appropriately. "People often have difficulty in returning to their jobs or getting promoted after giving birth and raising their children." "People often have disadvantage of going back to their jobs and getting promoted to their positions after giving birth and raising their children." Are both grammatical? Do they have the same meaning? I would appreciate your reply.Read More...
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Last Reply By mika · First Unread Post

Is it grammatical to say "getting the money was a factor in his thinking"?

I'm unsure. See here (my actual sentence): To what extent has making the US arms industry more dominant actually been a factor in Washington’s thinking when it comes to the Biden administration’s ongoing policy of prolonging the war? Also, does the "when it comes" attach unambiguously to "thinking"? Is there any way to eliminate any ambiguity on that front?Read More...
Hi, Andrew—Those constructions are a bit strange, even if not they are not ungrammatical. You might wish to use "the aim/desire of making" or "the aim/desire to make" instead. The same goes for the question in your title.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Is the bold a paraphrase or is the author asserting this?

See the bold (note that there are quotation marks after the bold that clearly indicate that something is being quoted, of course, but there's still the issue of whether the bold is the author's assertion): https://www.washingtonpost.com...IQA2ohKsT_story.html Mann and Ornstein rightly blame the news media for doing a mediocre job covering the most important political story of the last three decades: the transformation of the Republican Party. They are critical of the conventions of...Read More...
Hi, Andrew—Given the semantic connection between "false equivalence" and "an impression that the two sides are equally implicated," my sense is that the words you have placed in bold do continue the paraphrase and think that it would have been better to precede them with a semicolon or use an absolute construction ("it being much easier to write stories that . . .") instead.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

The need to use article "a" and "an"

Do I need to use article "a" or "an" in the below sentence? e.g. My client is husband and wife and they own an investment property . or My client is a husband and a wife and they own an investment property. if this is the correct one, why?Read More...
Hi, Tony, For the sake of grammatical agreement, I think you should say: - My clients are husband and wife and own an investment property.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Is “beaten egg” countable or uncountable?

Is “beaten egg” countable or uncountable? I understand that many English words used as a noun can be used as both countable and uncountable, and whether the word is used as countable or uncountable depends on how the word is used in a sentence. Having said that, I still find it confusing. My understanding is that the word “egg” is countable when it refers to an individual egg while the same word is uncountable when it refers to “beaten egg” as a substance. But I often see not only “into...Read More...
Hello, Gustavo. Thank for your explanation with an example.Read More...
Last Reply By Green Tea · First Unread Post

"it" in "I'd appreciate it if you would ..."

Hi, Is the "it" a dummy or regular pronoun in "I'd appreciate it if you would carry this chair to my room"? Could the if-subordinate clause be fronted to sentence-initial position? I'd appreciate your help.Read More...
Hi, all, Once again, I cannot but refer to this great thread where David clarifies how the "if"-clause is to be interpreted. As to how "it" is to be considered, I'd like to see David's opinion, but, in my view, "it" seems to be dummy if the "if"-clause follows and it is clearly a regular pronoun (its antecedent being the "if"-clause) if the "if"-clause appears in initial position.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

whatever

In this paragraph; The growing season in the Arctic region is short as well as cool, and plants must make the most of what warmth there is. Q1. Is this 'what' used as adjective to modify the noun 'warmth'? isn't that better to use 'whatever'? Is that common to use 'what' to modify noun? Q2. Is there any meaning difference when you use 'what' and 'whatever' instead? Thank you for your kind reply.Read More...
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Last Reply By vegnlove · First Unread Post

Will or going to

Hi, What do you think about the sentence attached?Read More...
Please type sentences you wish us to consider into the body of a post. Are you aware that the image you have uploaded does not even list "am going to" as a choice. Assuming the context is normal, "am meeting" is the best choice. "I think I am meeting him at entrance B. I can't remember." This means that, although the speaker can't really recall the plan, he or she believes that the plan was for him or her to meet the referent of "him" at the entrance labeled B.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Tag Questions

I came across the following sentence: You don't think she is ill,...........? (a) do you (b) is she I feel that both are possible. Am I correct? Thanks for your help.Read More...
Hi, Rasha Assem, No, ' a ' is the correct answer. - You don't think (that) she is ill, do you? The question tag should be based on the main clause . See here: https://thegrammarexchange.inf...opic/tag-question-12Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

"Pronouns" Or Introductory 'It'

Could you please tell me if the following sentences are correct or not? 1- Nowadays everyone is having a stressful life, Whether he or she is a man or woman. 2- Nowadays everyone is having a stressful life, Whether they are a man or a woman . 3- Nowadays everyone is having a stressful life, Whether they are men or women . 4- Nowadays everyone is having a stressful life, Whether be it men or women. 5- Nowadays everyone is having a stressful life, Whether be it a man or a woman.Read More...
Hi, Subhajit—I agree with Ahmed's answer. The "be it construction" can certainly still be used today, but it has a very old-fashioned sound. "Whether it be," however, is definitely archaic. Here's the revision I recommend for you: Everyone nowadays— men and women alike —is leading a stressful life.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Authority or responsibility

No one should have the .....to close a school as it is essential for society. a. authority b. availability c. acceptability d. responsibility I think A and b are okRead More...
Hi, Treasure, I see that only ' a ' works here. It means no one should have the power to close a school. I relate 'responsibility' to 'duty', which makes it sound odd here.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

A comma between two adjectives

Hussein Hassan
The following question is excerpted from an ACT practice test: While underground comics in the United States found a wider audience after the introduction of graphic novels in the 1980s, sophisticated mature comics for adult readers have flourished in Japan since the 1950s. NO CHANGE 1980s sophisticated and mature 1980s sophisticated mature 1980s, sophisticated, mature It's worth mentioning that Ericka Meltzer, in her book: The Complete Guide to ACT , indicates that a comma should be used...Read More...
Thank you so much, Gustavo and David!Read More...
Last Reply By Hussein Hassan · First Unread Post

how many times

Are these correct and meaningful: 1) We had a few suspects. There was a burglar who had been arrested multiple times, but we didn't know how many times. There was another burglar, who had been arrested multiple times and we knew how many times. Jones hadn't been arrested at all. 2) The burglar who had been arrested multiple times but we didn't know how many times had an alibi. The other one didn't. I don't think they work. I don't think: who had been arrested multiple times, but we didn't...Read More...
Thank you very much, David, Very elegant solutions to the problem. One more question here if I may: Of those two, the exact number of arrests was known of only one. Could one use 'about only one' instead of 'of only one' in the above sentence? Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Last Reply By navi · First Unread Post

Is it OK to have a misleading conjuction?

See the bold. My concern is that the bold could potentially lead into a verb like "conquer" (it could say "capture and conquer") but the bold instead goes into something that attaches back to the first word in the sentence; the brain might take a moment to read "has" and see what the conjunction is leading into. But maybe this is an unavoidable ambiguity that happens all the time. It’s mostly bombarded places—like Mariupol and Soledar—that it was trying to capture and has used massive...Read More...
Hi, Andrew—Have you considered using a comma after "capture"? You could also repeat the subject ("it"). Doing either or both of those things would solve the mental-processing problem, to whatever small extent it may exist for some.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

inversion

In this paragraph: Often overlooked, but just as important a stakeholder , is the consumer who plays a large role in the notion of the privacy paradox. Consumer engagement levels in all manner of digital experiences and communities have simply exploded - and they show little or no signs of slowing. Q. In the first sentence, I see the sentence is inverted. But, I am not clear why the word order of this part, 'but just as important as stakeholder' is like that. Isn't the subject of that...Read More...
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Last Reply By vegnlove · First Unread Post

abreast

In this following paragraph; After the United Nations environmental conference in Rio de Janeiro in 1992 made the term "sustainability" widely known around the world, the word became a popular buzzword by those who wanted to be seen as pro-environmental but who did not really intend to change their behavior. It became a public relations term, an attempt to be seen as abreast with the latest thinking of what we must do to save our planet from widespread harm. Q. in the dictionary, 'abreast'...Read More...
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Last Reply By vegnlove · First Unread Post

Does "naturally" perform two roles here? Is that OK?

See the bold (does it attach to "are" or "furious"?): We’ve seen heavy bombardment—going both ways—in the Donbass. There’s been extensive destruction in the eastern Donbass, which is one reason why the local population there is angry at Ukraine—it’s just like how people in cities Russia has bombarded are naturally furious with Russia. And now Russia is bombing infrastructure—above all, electricity and energy. But there hasn’t been any Korea-style or WW2-style carpet bombing of cities beyond...Read More...
Thank you, Gustavo, for that point.Read More...
Last Reply By TheParser · First Unread Post

themselves

In this sentence: Having said positive things, people liked the person more themselves. Q1. Is above sentence same as below? When people had said positive things (about the person), people liked the person more themselves. Q2. Why above sentence need 'themselves'? What is the difference in meaning with 'themselves' and without 'themselves'? Thank you for your kind reply!Read More...
Thank you!Read More...
Last Reply By vegnlove · First Unread Post

tenses

a. I was late. I thought that when I got home, my parents would have been worried. But they hadn't. They had figured out I'd be late and were not worried. b. I was late. I thought that when I got home, my parents would be worried. But they weren't. They had figured out I'd be late and were not worried. Which is grammatically correct? If they had been worrying, their worry would be over when I got home. So they wouldn't be worried when I got home. They'd have been worrying until that point in...Read More...
Thank you so much Gustavo. I like your (d) very much! It seems to me to be a elegant solution to the problem,Read More...
Last Reply By azz · First Unread Post

that the Supracargoes ...

Dear all: What is the exact meaning of the bold sentence in quotation mark in the following passage? It is from the book The East India Company in Persia by Peter Good, p. 66. The original text is from 1272. All the words in bold are problematic. If more text needed, let me know, please. and your petitioner is Humbly of [the] Opinion that all the English in Bussorah [Basra] when met together are better judges of the nature of that people and Government than any can supposed to be who were...Read More...
Dear raymondaliasapollyon : Thanks very much.Read More...
Last Reply By Pars · First Unread Post

used to

Hello. Is the following sentence correct? I think it is. - When I was on holiday, I used to go to the beach and swam in the sea every day. Thank you.Read More...
Hi, Ahmed and Gustavo , I agree with Gustavo's answer, and they are the ones I would go with in an exam. However, I see that the original sentence could work if the coordination is between 'used to go' and 'swam in the sea'. - When I was on holiday, I used to go to the beach, and I swam in the sea every day. David has a similar answer here: https://thegrammarexchange.inf...verb-past-or-presentRead More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

"Love That He Is"

Can I use the verb 'love' this way? I mean can 'love' be a intransitive verb? 1- I love that he is a very nice person.Read More...
Hi, Subhajit, "Love" is transitive above. Note that you can say I love it (with "it" referring to "his being a very nice person" or to "the fact that he is a very nice person"). In this thread you can read David's interesting comments about the grammaticality and idiomaticity of verbs of liking followed by "that"-clauses:Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post
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