All Forum Topics

Confusing sentence - please help

My brother isn't very good at grammar and occasionally he sends me things to check the grammar. Here is the sentence. I know it is wrong and doesn't sound right. I'm thinking particularly about the last bit that begins "and supplies..". Is there a technical term for what he has done here? I've changed some place names to keep it somewhat anonymous. Here is another example which I think has the same grammatical problem: Can someone pinpoint what this mistake is called?Read More...
Hi, jamest83, Welcome to our forum! I agree with you that both sentences have a problem, but I don't think it's the same kind of problem. In your first sentences, "supplies" has no subject. According to the context, we can infer that Stewarts Power Plant supplies the local properties with heat and hot water. The problem there is that in the relative clause that precedes "and supplies" your brother is using a passive voice with subject "waste." Here are some possible solutions: Instead, all...Read More...

Where should the hyphen go in this sentence and how does that change the meaning.

Where should the hyphen go in this phrase and how does that change the meaning. Mountain holiday prices at rock bottomRead More...
Hi, Mckenzie, No hyphens are needed in that phrase. Rock bottom is hyphenated when it precedes a noun and functions as an adjective; for example, rock-bottom prices . Otherwise it is not hyphenated. I'm assuming that Mountain is the name of a business. If it isn't, and mountain is supposed to be the first word of a sentence, then your sentence needs a verb: Mountain holiday prices are at rock bottom. That sentence means that holiday prices in the mountains are at rock bottom. Now, you could...Read More...

He is no richer than his friend is.

I'd appreciate it if someone would answer my question about A. Thanks in advance. A: He is no richer than his friend is. Which interprets A most, B or C or D? Sorry there is no context. Just analyze please. B: Neither he nor his friend is rich. C: He is poor just as his friend is poor. D: The degree of his poorness is the same as that of his friend.Read More...

What does the subject imply?

But as efficient as engines may be, they can't compensate for one glaring efficiency: us. Poor driving habits can slash fuel economy by as much as one-third. Above, does the subject 'they' means engines or drivers? A,,the word 'efficiency' is error, so it must be modified... .. What can it be better?Read More...
Thanks.Read More...

How What

Football's dramatic shoot-outs are a lottery? That's how losers think. The sentence above is in TIME. What difference does it make if "How" is replaced by "What"? Apple http://time.com/2838491/how-to-win-on-penalties/Read More...
Hi, M.T./Apple, "That's how losers think" refers to the way or to the manner in which they think. It means that losers generally prefer to attribute defeat to chance. "That's what losers think" refers to the object of their thinking. I'd say that this sentence is more specific, as it does not make reference to losers' habit of blaming chance for defeat but to what they think in this particular case.Read More...

would

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Please explain the meaning of using "would" in the sentence: "It would be difficult for me to finish the work by the weekend." Thank you.Read More...
Thank you, Amy.Read More...

afterthought or double focus?

1-He plays the guitar, as his brother does. 2-He plays the guitar, like his brother. These sentences would normally mean: a-He plays the guitar and so does his brother. I think the sentences might also mean: b-He plays the guitar the same way his brother does. I always thought that in this case, the part after the comma has been added as an afterthought. I thought they could only reflect spoken language. But could these sentences not be used if we have two focal points? I want to say that he...Read More...
Thank you, Navi. I was thinking that perhaps a dash could be used instead of a period in sentences 1.c and 2.c. A dash would imply a longer pause than a comma, thus imitating the time the speaker takes for his/her afterthought. If we use a period, the second sentence turns out to be incomplete, but perhaps this may be justified by the fact that it merely reflects speech in which some elements are tacit. Maybe our moderators can shed further light on this.Read More...

usage of comma and inversion(as-similarity)

Hi, professors. I want to ask a question about the usage of comma and inverted form. ex1.Tom went to the concert, as did you. (O) ex2.Tom went to the concert as did you. (??) I don't know whether ex2 has any chance of being right in terms of strict grammaticality. This issue is directly concerned with a formal situation, which means one of the official test items in the public secondary school. I hope you would kindly inform me with explanation based on prescriptivist's point of view.Read More...
Great, the use of "and". ThanksRead More...

doesn't have group

Hi, Which one(s) is(are) better/correct/grammatical/grammatically correct, why? 1. She does not have group at 3:00 p.m. 2. She does not have a group at 3:00 p.m. 3. She does not have any group at 3:00 p.m. 4. She does not have groups at 3:00 p.m. 5. She does not have any groups at 3:00 p.m. 6. She does not have a/any group(s) at 3:00 p.m. at all. Is at all correct to use there, in any example? ThanksRead More...
ThanksRead More...

noun clause

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Please tell me the function of the noun clause "that smoking has bad effects on our health" => The assumption that smoking has bad effects on our health has been proved." Thank you.Read More...
Dear David, Thank you very much. It is a very helpful lesson.Read More...

Punctuation

Q: I like shrimp; it's delicious. I wonder what is wrong in punctuation bleow. Does semicolon function as period, and also possilbe to omit transition words?Read More...
Hi, Jiho, I'm afraid a semicolon is not the best choice in this case. A semicolon may be used instead of a period as you say, but more often than not it is found in longer sentences where the second coordinate clause - the one coming after the semicolon - is usually introduced by a linking word: Example: Shrimp is my favorite seafood and I usually order some when I go to a restaurant; however, I must say that it is quite expensive and not easily found at the cheap restaurants in my...Read More...

Job-ss OR Job-z?

I thought both the plural form of common noun "job" and the family name of Apple co-founder should be pronounced as /jobz/ with voiced /z/. cf. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/jobs However, I notice some people pronounce "jobs" or "Jobs" as /job-ss/ with voiceless /s/. cf. http://www.howjsay.com/index.p...d=jobs&submit=Submit http://www.howjsay.com/index.p...d=cubs&submit=Submit /job-ss/ or /cub-ss/ also an acceptable way of pronunciation?Read More...
Hi Ken, I personally think the final 's' in that recording sounds a bit like a mix between /z/ and /ss/, and I also think the speaker's very clipped pronunciation of 'job' has something to do with it. I'd say it would be more clearly a /z/ in an American pronunciation of 'jobs'. In a word, no. There may be cases in which the difference between the /z/ sound and the /ss/ sound is less clear than usual, but if you try to pronounce 'cubs' with an /ss/, it will sound as though you are saying 'cups'.Read More...

Wouldn't you? Why?

Hi all, Is "Wouldn't you? Why" a suitable reply to someone's saying " I would not do it if I were you."? Many thanksRead More...
Thank you Amy. "The new" me again The above issue is what I read from a test. The 4 options are as exactly as are stated above. I had to think a lot, considered each option, eliminated one after one,and finally decided the best option in this case was "Wouldn't you? Why?", which is the official answer. I just wanted to share and wish those test makers could read this and would be more careful later. Once again, thank all of you so much for the contributions.Read More...

will for predictions

Hi. I came across this sentence. There are some dark clouds now, it will rain tonight. Why is "will" used here? I'd use "be going to" because there is evidence that it will rain. Thank you.Read More...
Sorry, Kuen, I neglected to add that with the 'be going to' future, I would not expect the final clause to be added to that sentence. That seems far too uncertain. But it would be possible to say this, for example: "I am going to take a week's vacation sometime next month, but I'm not sure about the exact dates yet." In this case, the speaker would be intending to take a week off next month, but might not yet be sure which week. Possibly two different weeks are currently being considered,...Read More...

reading comprehension

" Although money ought by no means to be regarded as a chief end of man's life, neither is it a trifling matter, to be held in philosophic contempt, representing as it does to so large an extent, the means of physical comfort and social well-being" I quoted it from: http://www.studyguidezone.com/thea_reading.htm Can you explain the structure of that sentence? What is held in philosophic contempt? How many simple sentences in that sentence? It's too difficult for me to understand. All your...Read More...
Thank you very much.Read More...

Apply a test

What do you think/infer/understand/interpret by reading this: She applies the II test next week ? ThanksRead More...
Grammar Exchange has found a great contributor, Amy and David as wise as always. Gustavo, gracias.Read More...

Should there be an apostrophe ?

Hi all GE members Should there be an apostrophe after hours in the following sentence? He makes sure he spends a few hours quality time with his children every day. Many thanksRead More...
I have read/seen in this thread: Is the apostrophe optional? Is the last one well-written? ThanksRead More...

studying about

Hi, which one is better, why? 1. Students were studying about prepositions of place. 2. Students were studying prepositions of place. ThanksRead More...
Gracias David, I am learning a lot by reading your posts. I will continue reading to understand it/them as deep and clear as possible Nos mantenemos en contacto (keep in touch)Read More...

Feedback from other forum members and/or moderators

Gustavo, Contributor
Hi everybody, I really love this forum. The level is really good and there are some remarkable experts out there. I started to use it to make enquiries and then I realized that I could venture to make some contributions myself. I'd like to share with you my view that it would be important to always receive some feedback from the person who has asked a question or from a moderator. When I answer a question, it sometimes happens that a moderator confirms or refutes my opinion, and that's...Read More...
Everything and every thing (that has been) said about Gustavo is true, it's great, now he is one of those great people and staff; David, Amy, Rachel, Richard and so on, right? Blessings everywhereRead More...

poor English or bad English

Rachael, thank you for all the efforts you made to make me understand. I have a question here, though. Concerning your examples under my questions about "with my lousy English" or "in my lousy English," you used "bad English." I have always used "poor" to describe one's English ability insead of "bad." I am so surprised to see you used it. I searched google, and yes, there are more examples of "bad" than examples of "poor." So, tell me, please, is "bad" more often used in both spoken and...Read More...
Hi Amy, Thank you very much for your explanation.Read More...
Last Reply By wwwblogkiseblogspotcom · First Unread Post

had...been

Hello friends. I'm trying to understand why someone would use had...been when have ...been seems to carry the same meaning. How long had the animals been been without food and water? There is no context given where I lifted the sentence from. But the topic is on the Past Perfect Tense . Any help will be greatly appreciated. Cheers, GilbertRead More...
I guess I have powers that defy human understanding! Happy Birthday, David Evans! (Er...you're like 23 or something, right? Hee, hee...) Phew... this is a tough one to crack. We'll just leave it at that as, like you said, either choice can be correct and it all depends on the situation and the intended meaning. It's your birthday, so go out and paint the town red! Thanks and have a good one! GilbertRead More...

Is a comma before "while" optional?

Mary talked about her past relationship problems with her son, while Herman shared honestly his marital woes. Is a comma before "while" optional? Thanks.Read More...
Hello, Ms. Tan, Technically, yes: the comma before while is optional. It seems to me, however, that in addition to contributing a welcome pause in a long sentence, that comma serves to eliminate ambiguity. Without the comma before while , the reader might initially think that the while -clause relates to problems — Mary's relationship problems with her son occurred while Herman shared his marital woes — before realizing that that interpretation makes no sense. The sentence is, of course,...Read More...
×
×
×
×