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Me and my vs my and my

Hi everyone, newbie to the forum and have a question. I would naturally say "me and my partner´s dog" but I have doubts as to whether the gramatically correct way would be "my and my partner´s dog", though this sounds very strange when I say it aloud. I know that it is more polite to say "my partner and I" but that sounds even stranger "my partner and I´s/me´s/my dog" Which is the correct way? Apart from saying "our dog" Thsks in advanceRead More...
Thanks for the clarification David cheers 😜Read More...
Last Reply By zevvy · First Unread Post

first conditional

1. If she smiles more, people will like her. 2. If she smiled more, people would like her. The above sentences come from "Oxford English Grammar Course." The latter works for me. However, I cannot think of a context in which the first fits. Can you expand the first one for me?Read More...
Many, many thanks. What about this version: She's getting ready to begin a presentation and she's nervous about that. People are talking about "her" and decide that she'll be more likeable if she smiles. .... I know that here, "she would be more likeable if she smiled" is not correct. But I wonder if the above sentence sounds natural to you.Read More...
Last Reply By Freeguy · First Unread Post

Passive voice. 1

1. Who was that book written by? 2. By whom was that book written? Are both correct? Thanks.Read More...
Hi, Freeguy, I agree with Sarah that both are correct. Although it is possible to say, "Whom was that book written by?," most people would not say that, because it sounds stiltedly formal. So it would be silly to say that the version with "who," which almost everyone would use instead, is incorrect. On the contrary, it's fine. Why not use the active voice? You could simply say: " Who wrote that book? "Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Seems like (as If)

Hello, everyone! Very glad to meet you here. 1. He seems to be happy. 2. It seems that he is happy. (formal style) 3. It seems like ( as if ) he is happy. (informal style) 1. Sentence #1 ; I assume that ' to infinitive ' functions as subject complement (that is, subject + intransitive verb + subject complement). 2. Sentence #2, 3 ; I assume that 1) ' it ' functions as extraposed it to set up 'end focus', 2) the conjunctions - ' that ' and ' like ', ' as if' in informal style - lead not a...Read More...
Many thanks for your reply, Mr.David. I will really appreciate, if you let me know how you analyze above that , like ( as if ) clauses in (2), (3) as a subject complement or a real subject , since it has been a difficult problem to me for long. Best RGDS,Read More...
Last Reply By deepcosmos · First Unread Post

Preposition or No Preposition

ahmad
Hello, everyone, 1. He used the pen gifted him by his father to sign his maiden contract. 2. He calculated the money spent him by his family. Are these sentences correct? If yes, what is the underlying structure? Thanks.Read More...
Hello, Ahmad, "Indirect object" is a term that is used in different ways by different grammarians and textbook authors. I use "indirect object" in reference to the first NP object in what they are calling the double-object construction. I, too, use "double-object construction" instead of "indirect-object construction," but I tend to do so only in my private thinking about grammar or when talking to linguists. I use "indirect-object construction" when teaching learners. The other construction...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

tenses

1) This is the first time I am walking down this road. 2) This is the first time I have walked down this road. Which one would one use if one was walking down that road? 3) This is the first time I am eating a hamburger in years. 4) This is the first time I have eaten a hamburger in years. Which one would one use if one was eating that hamburger? Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Hello again, Navi, I made a slight change to your (5a), but I think my (5a) is how you meant to type it. You can change it if you like. In answer to your question, I actually think that (5) itself works quite well in both contexts. You're right that (5) is ambiguous as to whether the repair is ongoing or just finished, but I don't think that's a bad thing. The "ongoing" interpretation may, I think, be paraphrased like this: This is the first time I have engaged in the act of repairing a bicycle.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

high school friend

1) He's my friend since high school. 2) He's my friend from high school. 3) He's my high school friend. Which could be used if we are no longer in high school? Which could be used if we are still in high school? Which could be used if we were friends at high school but haven't been in touch for a long time? Does '3' imply that he is my only high school friend. Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Hello, Navi, Sentence (2) could be used in that context, and perhaps also (1), but I find (1) grammatically questionable. I'd use the present perfect, not the simple present. 1a) He's been my friend since high school. Sentences (2) and (3) could be used in that context. If the speaker has more than one friend, it would be better to use (3a) instead of (3). This addresses your last question ("Does '3' imply that he is my only high school friend?"). 3a) He's a high school friend. That...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Letter

Can anyone help me correct my grammatical errors here? Thanks in advance! Theres no turning back now that i have the audacity to express what ive been feeling ever since the day i saw you from afar. I've been waiting for this day for ages, and I think now is the right time for me to send this to you. And with that being said, I therefore 'confess' my feelings towards you. This may seem weird as we havent met nor seen each other for a long period of minute, but theres nothing greater than...Read More...
Hello, Kyle, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! Thank you for sharing your love letter with us. I hope it's successful. Unfortunately, it does contain some grammatical errors (mainly errors of punctuation, but some errors of other types), and we don't edit things for people at this site. If you have a grammatical question about one of the sentences, try to identify what it is about the grammar that troubles you. Then you can start a discussion thread related to that specific question and...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

so, therefore

Hello, In the following sentence, can "so" and "therefore" be used interchangeably? Nobody wants to lose the freedom, so (therefore) the threat of prison is a powerful way to prevent illegal activities. AppleRead More...
Ah, thank you, Gustavo, for your comment. AppleRead More...
Last Reply By apple · First Unread Post

Past participle (passive)

Hello, I inquire when to use (being pp) rather than (pp). Am I right to use (being pp) to refer to progressive tenses in passive? For example: 1-" .......a story by his mother, he slept." A- Told b- Being told I think (B) is correct 2- "When she was told the news, she was happy." This means: ".........the news, she was happy." a- Told b- Being told I think (A) is correctRead More...
Thank youRead More...
Last Reply By Ahmed Abdelhafeez · First Unread Post

Tenses

ahmad
Hello, everyone, Which one the below sentences are correct/acceptable? 1. I would not stand here today unless they were there for me. 2. I would not have stood here today unless they were there for me. 3. I would not be standing here today unless they were there for me. Thanks.Read More...
Hello, Ahmad, In that case, the speaker should really have used (3) instead. You seem to have grasped the type of context I was referring to. Sentence (1) ("I would not stand here today unless they were there for me") could be used in a context in which the speaker was speaking of a decision to stand "here today," where the standing had not yet occurred -- a weird context indeed. Sentence (2) ("I would not have stood here today unless they were there for me") could be used in a context in...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

tenses

Which one has the correct tense? a. I was very uneasy yesterday when you saw me after the show. I was talking to John and actually it was the first time I was talking to him since our argument at Jane's party. I tried to find you after my conversation with him was over, but you'd already left. b. I was very uneasy yesterday when you saw me after the show. I was talking to John and actually it was the first time I'd talked to him since our argument at Jane's party. I tried to find you after...Read More...
Hi, Azz, It is (b) that has the correct tense. The past perfect (" it was the first time I' d talked to him since . . . ") is needed. The progressive (" it was the first time I was talking to him since ") doesn't work.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

everyone who is not in this room

1) We owe this to everyone who is not in this room to try. The sentence is from the preview of the upcoming Avengers movie. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KCSNFZKbhZE Two questions: a) Shouldn't it be 'we owe it...'? Maybe '1' would work if we had a colon before 'to try'? b) I think by 'everyone who is not in this room' she means the members of the Avengers who died. She doesn't mean everybody in the whole world who is not in the room. Would you say that is correct? Gratefully, Navi PS. I...Read More...
Hello, Navi, I agree with you completely. Either "this" should be changed to "it" (so that there is extraposition of the infinitive) or a colon should be placed before "to try" (so that the infinitive is in apposition to "this"). I think that you are probably right about that, Navi, but I'm not in a place where I can watch and listen to the YouTube right now, so I can't say for sure.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

"You met him last night" - What is last night?

HI everyone, In Michael Swan's Practical English Usage, 4th Edition, section 233.6, it says "You met him last night ". Could someone please explain what " last night " is please. Many thanks, PhilipRead More...
Hi, Philip, Yes, "all the time" is a noun phrase. In the sentence "They argue all the time" that noun phrase is functioning as an adverbial equivalent in meaning to "constantly." Given that noun phrases are capable of functioning syntactically as adverbial adjuncts, it is unnecessary to postulate omitted structure here. Apart from that, it is undesirable to postulate omitted structure which would be grammatically questionable (or highly awkward at best) if it were not omitted. The...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Where is this?

Hello, Suppose you are on a sightseeing bus. The bus is going along the broad street and you see several famous buildings on both sides. You look out of the window and want to know where you are now. (what part of the city your bus is going through) I would say, "where are we?" but can you say "where is this?" AppleRead More...
Thank you, David, for saying that the dialogue between the little boy and his mother on the bus is extremely weird, because I didn't create it, but thought it was extremely weird, something that educated native English speakers would not say. It was a video clip created by a huge English conversation school. They say they have a large number of native speakers as teachers, and on top of that, the whole process of making this promotion video clip has been handled by native English speakers.Read More...
Last Reply By apple · First Unread Post

earned ... by completing VS completed.., earning

I have made up two similar sentences below. (1) I earned an advanced level certificate by completing ten computer courses. (2) I completed ten computer courses, earning an advanced level certificate. I showed my non-native English speaking friends my sentences. They said (1) is OK and (2) is wrong. I don't see anything wrong with it. Do you agree with my friends? Thanks for your help.Read More...
Hi, Ansonman, While (2) is not incorrect, it is rather awkward, at least in isolation, because it provides no overt indication of a cause-and-effect relationship. I recommend using a small addition. Below are a few viable options: (2a) I completed ten courses, thereby earning a certificate. (2b) I completed ten courses, earning a certificate as a result . (2c) I completed ten courses, earning a certificate in the process .Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

<I ever received or I had ever received> and <is/was very valuable>

Suppose that you collect postage stamps. Sometimes, you receive free stamps from your friends. You want to talk about your second stamp in your collection of over one thousand stamps. (1a) The second stamp I ever received from one of my friends was very valuable. (2a) The second stamp I had ever received from one of my friends was very valuable. Most of my non-native English speaking friends said either sentence is correct. So, they revised them to make the next two sentences. (1b) The...Read More...
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