All Forum Topics

Dangling participle?

So, an acquaintance states the following newspaper correction: As stated in the paper - “10 years ago: The girls track and field team placed fifth at the Class 1A Western Regional Championships in Cherokee, one of the highest finishes the team ever had.“ Grammar violation alleged - “Had" is the past participle of the transitive verb "to have." It is improper in English grammar to conclude a sentence with a participle. It is, in fact, called a "dangling participle." Help: how is this a...Read More...
Thank you, David.Read More...
Last Reply By Craig · First Unread Post

Comma placement

Hello Does anyone know where a comma should go in the following sentence? Sentence: I walked to school and when I got there I saw a big cat. Examples: 1. I walked to school, and when I got there, I saw a big cat. 2. I walked to school, and, when I got there, I saw a big cat. 3. I walked to school, and when I got there I saw a big cat. Which are correct and why?Read More...
Hi, SadPerson—The placement of commas does not affect how the sentence should be analyzed in terms of its clausal constituents. If you are worried about whether its status as a compound-complex sentence is affected by the placement of commas, it isn't. It would be a compound-complex sentence even if it were punctuated without any commas: I walked to school and when I got there I saw a big cat. How to punctuate that sentence depends on how you think such sentences should be punctuated. If you...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

In over

This is the first time in over 30 years that our team has made it to the champion finals. ▪If I omit the preposition "in", will there be any change in meaning of that sentence? Because, I think "over" in this sentence neans "during", so there is no need to use extra "in" before "over". ▪If I omit "over" then does it mean during? Like: this is the first time during 30 years?Read More...
Hi Toaha, It’s true that in/during/over are sometimes interchangeable as prepositions of time, but not in this case where in your sentence “over” means “more than”, so it cannot be omitted. It means: In 30+ years this is the first time... So yes, there will be a change to the meaning if you drop it. I think “in” can be understood as “during” here although it can’t really be replaced that way. For a duration of how long without an indicator of when, we use “ in 30 days ”. With an indicator of...Read More...
Last Reply By Kinto · First Unread Post

Formatting question for my manuscript

Hello! I have a manuscript I am working on, and I've written it using courier font. I'm trying to break the habit of double spacing after periods, though from what I've read it seems like you're supposed to double space after a period when using courier. Is it okay to single space, or do I need to go back and double space after every period in my book? Thank you!Read More...
Again, it is not a grammatical matter. It's hard for me to believe that anybody would frown upon that; however, it is none of my concern.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Past simple or perfect

My father retired last week.He.... for the same company all his life(had worked/worked)Read More...
The past perfect is technically justifiable, of course, but it is rather forced, unnatural, and academic here. In a case where someone has worked somewhere all his life until a week ago, he may as well have just stopped working there. He has worked there all his life. Last week he retired.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Mixed conditional

In our English courses I found these two mixed conditionals, I would be grateful if you could explain why? I think this is found in spoken English. 1- If you need to know information about a new film, how would you get it? 2- What would you do if you get lost in a big city? ( I think " get" in no 2 may be a misprint)Read More...
Thank you ahmed_btm, I’m amazed they are exactly the same questions.Read More...
Last Reply By Kinto · First Unread Post

change

If I need to get off and take a different bus, then which should I use: 1. I need to change buses. 2. I need to change to a different bus. Does the same go with TV channels, plans? Thanks.😊Read More...
Yes, Ruifeng, both work. We use the plural to indicate that two buses, or two channels, are involved in the process, and the singular to indicate the one we finally take or choose ( change ( from one bus/channel) to another one ).Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Yes, she doesn’t

Hello, In ABC of Common Grammatical Errors (Nigel D Turton, MacMillan) there is this entry “ yes ” including two error examples: ‘ She doesn’t like meat.’ — ‘Yes, she doesn’t.’ Yes, I don’t go running in my badminton shoes. And they should be corrected, according to the book, as: ‘ She doesn’t like meat.’ — ‘No, she doesn’t.’ No, I don’t go running in my badminton shoes. The book explains: ” When we want to confirm that a negative statement or belief is correct, we use no (NOT yes ). ‘He...Read More...
Thank you very much David for once again solving a lasting doubt of mine.Read More...
Last Reply By Kinto · First Unread Post

Which one is grammaticaly correct and why?

Which one is grammatically correct and why? Please explain: ◆If someone attempts to insult you by implying you aren't intelligent, and you respond with poor language/writing skills, or insults and illogical reasoning, you just may prove that what they say is true. ◆If someone attempts to insult you by implying you aren't intelligent, and you respond with poor language/writing skills, or insults and illogical reasoning, you just may prove that what they said is true. ◆If someone attempts to...Read More...
All three are OK, Toaha, but I recommend using ". . . have said is . . ." instead.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Direct (something) to be/being?

Which of the following sentences is correct? 1. I directed every moment of my life to being productive. 2. I directed every moment of my life to be productive. 3. I directed every moment of my life in being productive. Thank you!Read More...
Hello, AlterReal, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange, The correct sentence is (1), because, being a preposition, that "to" needs a noun after it, and the gerund works as a noun.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Adding two sentences

I would love to be like her. I would love to be having my son singing at my birthday party. If I add this two sentences, can I say like this : "I would love to be like her, having my son singing at my birthday party". Or how can I add those sentences and make one which sounds natural?Read More...
Hi, Toaha, Actually, I would love to be like her, having my son singing at my birthday party makes a better sentence because, instead of (2) above, I'd use: I would love to have my son singing at my birthday party. "be having" does not sound well in this case, but "having" does because it introduces a participial clause.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

watering , being watered

Hello. Choose: Why? - These plants require (watering - being watered) every day. Thank you.Read More...
Hi, Ahmed Imam Attia, Verbs like need, want, require take V-ing with a passive meaning. Although being watered and to be watered can also be found, the simple gerund ( watering , in this case) is the most idiomatic form.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

SOME CONFUSING PHRASES

Could anyone please explain the phrases in bold to me? I am super confused about them. When defending oneself from those insulting one’s alleged intelligence, it helps to use proper grammar, punctuation and spelling so as to not appear to prove their point. Otherwise you leave the appearance of being benightedly supercilious .Read More...
Hi, Toaha, To put it simply, if someone says you are not intelligent and you respond in writing, you should do so in good language. Otherwise, you will confirm you are not intelligent and will sound like you claim to be something you are not.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Compound Complex or Compound

Hello, I am studying English right now and my teacher said the following sentence is a compound sentence but I don't see how. Maryam and Yasmin arrived at the bus station before noon, and they left before Grace got there. I think it should be a compound-complex because of " before Grace got there" is a dependant clause. My teacher wrote as follows: "Do you see that these are two separate sentences?: Maryam and Yasmin arrived at the bus station before noon. They left before Grace got there.Read More...
Hello, Withnail73, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. Actually, I would classify that sentence just like you did: it is compound because it consists of more than one main clause ( Maryam and Yasmin arrived at the bus station before noon / they left ), and complex because there is at least one subordinate clause ( before Grace got there ). However, your teacher might want to reserve the term "compound complex" for those sentences where the subordinate clause modifies the sentence as a...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Being

I'm going to try to turn a long story short but I know it's going to end up being long. Is the word "being" was used as "as" in that sentence? Like: I'm going to try to turn a long story short but I know it's going to end up as long.Read More...
Thanks a bunch, David for this informative explanation 💖Read More...
Last Reply By Toaha · First Unread Post

If you abandoned a town house and left it empty

According to the saying "nature abhors a vacuum", if you abandoned a town house and left it empty som ebody would soon move in and live in it. Do this sentence indicates 2nd conditional: If you abandoned a town house and left it empty somebody would soon move in and live in it.Read More...
Thanks David 💖💖Read More...
Last Reply By Toaha · First Unread Post

happen to be

Hi, everyone, what is meaning of "happen to be" in this sentence? "Groundwater happens to be a big source of our own drinking water today." I searched it in dictionary but none of them match to this sentence. thanks in advanceRead More...
“I would rather he not be taking something that has not been approved by the scientists, especially in his age group, and in his, shall we say, weight group: ‘Morbidly obese,’ they say,” What about <<he not be taking>> phrase above? Simple present, present continuous or future tense?Read More...
Last Reply By sertoksoz · First Unread Post

The future tenses

The next Olympic games....in London (Will be/is going to be /is)Read More...
Hi, Ahmed, I see that the most natural choice here is "will be''. 'Will' is more formal than 'be going to' and is used in formal style for scheduled events. 'Is / Are' can also work if the intended meaning is to tell somebody a statement of fact.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post
×
×
×
×