All Forum Topics

Resolutions.

Her resolutions are to party a little, to go out a litte and have a little. Should I use singlular or plural on resoultion? Thank youRead More...
You're right, my friend. That's not going to work.Read More...

Had

She hoped that she was not a little self centered if she said that 'she would go if they had chips and sodas for the party.' Is 'had' used correctly? If not, which is a better word? Thank youRead More...
Yes, the sentence is fine. 'Had' is correct because it its tense is governed by 'said.' And 'said' is past because the main verb of the sentence is past: 'hoped.' If the reporting verb were in the present tense, the situation would be different: She hopes that she was not a little self centered if she says that 'she will go if they have chips and sodas for the party.' But, the sentence is about 'hoped.' The verbs are past: She hoped that she was not a little self centered if she said that...Read More...

suffer

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Which is correct? "Most miners suffer ... from tunnel collapse and from flooding." a. die b. death c. dead d. dying I chose (b). Is it correct? Thanks.Read More...
Yes, Mido is right. 'Suffer' could take only a noun, which is 'death' here, or possibly an adverb like 'greatly,' which isn't a choice.Read More...

Doing jumping Jacks

- I found some pics of her with these two kids. So I figured that she was probably married, but I kept going through and couldn't find any pics of any guy. BUT I ended up forgetting about it since she apparently had two kids. - Well a couple of months later I was talking to her and she had one of her kids with her. So during the conversation I thought it would be a good time to bring up the other one. Ends up that she doesn't have two kids. The other kid was a cousin. And she was single. So...Read More...
"The other one" must refer to the other child. She had one with her and the speaker brought up the subject of the other one. But if the other kid was a cousin, who is the kid with her now??? "Doing jumping Jacks in my head" means imagining yourself jumping up and down for joy. Jumping Jacks are actually a common exercise -- you jump in the air and land with your legs spread out while you clap your hands above your head. Then jump again and land with your feet together and hands at your side.Read More...

parks department

Tom worked for a long time in the parks deaprtment . What does the expression in bold mean? Thanks!Read More...
the parks department : is the agency/administration responsible for gardens, parks, trees, etc.Read More...

One in 16 US doctors has/have helped.....

One in 16 US doctors has/have helped at least one patient commit suicide. Which is correct, has or have? AppleRead More...
And Rachel, do you know this disputable grammar point is often tested? And the answer is always Plural. He's one of the doctors who have helped a patient in this way. The explanation is: He is one of the doctors. The doctors have helped a patient in this way. So when we combine, WHO refers to the doctors. This explains why the verb is plural.Read More...

Well done job

- When my boss is here, there's a tension that permeates everything. Your breath catches in your chest and just sticks there for the entire day—no heartburn or reflux medicine can remove the feeling! The man never recognizes anyone for a job well done, yet he never yells at anyone for screwing up. He rarely ever cracks a smile or laughs, but he doesn't yell. It's almost like he's a robot, an automaton that lives to sit in his office and go over minute details of things people will never see...Read More...
The person who wrote this piece came up with that descriptive way to say that the employees are always very tense when the boss is around. You're right in calling it a figurative way of describing this feeling, Nammy. Understand that this is not a commonly used figure of speech; it's this writer's unique way of describing how the employees feel around the boss. As for that other sentence, it's perfectly correct. There's a bit of ellipsis in the sentence: The man never recognizes anyone for a...Read More...

a road sweeper

Something very strange happened to me the other night. As I was going home this man came up to me. He had untidy hair and paint all over his clothes. He told me that he was the head of the local council and that he was offering me a job as _____________. a. a road sweeper b. the road sweeper c. road sweeper Are they all correct? What's the difference? Thanks!Read More...
Probably 'a road sweeper' would be correct. This would indicate that it's a job ; there are two or more road sweeper jobs in existence. It could be the job if the speaker is referring to the only existing road sweeping job. And, it could be just road sweeper (without any article) if it is a certain job, but usually an office held at a high level, as in He's now president of the company . So, in this passage it's possible that any of the three might be used. Since the man who's offering the...Read More...

speak

engfan
what is the difference between talk and speak i speak French i talk FrenchRead More...
With the names of languages, we always use 'speak.' Your sentence is this: I speak French. It's often difficult to know which verb to use: say, speak, talk or tell . A discussion of these verbs is attached below.Read More...

special verbs + ing?

Hi Some friends argue that the verbs "hope" and "refuse" can be followed by a gerund (ing) and they say that this is a special case e.g: - I hope seeing him soon. (rather than to see) - I refuse going to his parents anymore. (rather than to go). I find this strange, is that true?? thanksRead More...
Thanks Rachel! That is what I thought tooRead More...

Partner = College?

- On the day we finally sold the company and were walking out the door, the two of them stopped, turned to one another, and hugged. These were guys I'd worked, sweated, planned, laughed and cried with for over three decades. They were good guys. And on every other occasion, they acted as if I were a full partner. But in that precise moment, I knew where I had always stood. - In this context the speaker is the person who founded this company with the other two. So why don't we use the word...Read More...
You must be thinking of the word 'colleague,'Namcoolguy, which is also a word that would work here, as well as 'partner.' A 'colleague' is a person who works with you at more or less the same level.Read More...

lacked/lacked of

She lacked/lacked of sleeping. Do you need 'of'? Thank youRead More...
No, you shouldn't use of : She lacked sleep. (Note that in this context, sleep is the noun, not the verb.)Read More...

consider+ing

She considered taking the driving test. Is the above sentence correct? Thank youRead More...
Yes, that's fine, Welkins. When we use a verb phrase or a clause after consider , the verb is put in the -ing form.Read More...

being that

Do these five sentences have the same meaning? And are these correct grammatically? 1. Michael Jackson was deprived of his childhood being that he started his singing carreer at such a young age. 2. Michael Jackson was deprived of his childhood because he started his singing carreer at such a young age. 3. Starting his singing carreer at such a young age, Michael Jackson was deprived of his childhood. 4. Michael Jackson was deprived of his childhood, starting his singing carreer at such a...Read More...
Sentences 1 to 4 all have the same meaning and are grammatically okay, but I should point out that the use of being that is considered informal or conversational and not good for formal writing. Sentence 5 doesn't work. You can't have a combination like being starting .Read More...

Greetings!

Merry Merry Christmas to all GE members, especially to our beloved, great moderators, Rachel and Richard! Thank you so much for being so kind people to help us understand the complexity of the English language. Iwtk LOVES GE FOREVER!!Read More...
Yes, thank you very much!Read More...

than it is spoken

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Is the sentence written properly? "What is written is more easily understood than it is spoken." Thanks.Read More...
Thank you, Rachel, for helping me. I am very grateful to you.Read More...

funiture

engfan
hello is there another synonym for carpenter? A carpenter is a person who makes furniture? A joiner makes doors ....etc. what about the person who sells it ? can i say furniturer? A carpenter may sell furniture..... is the word furniturer in any dictionary.. thanks thanksRead More...
I suppose it would mean a person who makes/sells furniture. But, does it exist, even on Google? You know that Google has a lot of entries that are not good English. And, remember that if you look for 'furniturer' on Google, it will find 'furniture' since that word is the same, but without the R at the end. Would you mind posting a couple of the hits you got for 'furniturer,' Engfan?Read More...

got and gotten

engfan
hello Is gotten used in America only ? I've read that in England they consider it wrong ....... get is an infinitive verb when it is used in the present perfect, it becomes" have got" how can i differentiate between have got in the present simple and in the present perfect? can i say " i have got a car since 2005." thanks a lotRead More...
You're right, Engfan, about the British not using 'gotten.' See these notes from the LDOCE: http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/gotten _______ 'I have got' in the present means 'I have.' I have got a car now. It's new. In the present perfect the meaning is 'I have had.' I have got a new car only twice in my life so far. _______ You will have to understand the context. It shouldn't be difficult.Read More...

one another

engfan
Hello is there a difference between each other and one another?Read More...
In many instances, 'each other' and 'one another' can be used interchangeably. Yet, it is strictly correct to use 'each other' to speak of two entities, as in John and Mary love each other very much , and 'one another' when speaking of more than two, as in All the people in the Smith family -- all seven of them -- love one another very much. . There are some other special instances, too. Please see the attachment, from the American Heritage Dictionary*: _______ *The American Heritage...Read More...

go down

Are sentences 1 and 2 correct: 1-His hand went gently down on the desk. (His hand went down and landed gently on the desk.) 2-His fist went down on the desk. (He hit the desk with his fist.)Read More...
The sentences are grammatically correct and mean what your explanations say. The sentences below, the blue ones, are more expressive and, I think, better.Read More...

Afro-American?

Hi, Please see the attachment and reply to my questions below. 1. What is the difference in meaning between Afro-American, Africo-American, Afro and African-American ? 2. I wonder how terms like "Negro", "Black", etc, have become acceptable though they weren't before.Read More...
I see. Thanks a lot.Read More...

present and perfect participle

cocoricot
My mother always the first one to get up early to make sure that we leave home for school ... breakfast and ... in suitable clothes. a. eating/dressing b. having eaten/dressed Are both (a) and (b) correct? Thanks.Read More...
My mother is always the first one to get up early to make sure that we leave home for school having eaten breakfast and dressed in suitable clothes. This sentence would be OK, but it's heavy. How about: My mother is always the first one to get up early to make sure that when we leave home for school, we have eaten breakfast and have(gotten) dressed in suitable clotheRead More...
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