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Predicted...ing

He predicted John going to win the election. Am I correctly using 'predicted...ing'? Thank youRead More...
I don't find this jarring, my friend, but it's certainly not the common way we'd say this idea. The much more common way is John predicted (that) he would beat everyone in this year's tennis tournament. * Everyone is one word. **Use in a game , not on a game . ***If he predicted he'd beat everyone , I imagine he's talking about a tournament, not just one game.Read More...

that

Birds have that most treasured of all senses—sight—so highly developed that there is nothing with which we can compare it among living creatures. Is the sentence above the same as these? Birds have that which is most treasured of all senses—sight—so highly developed that there is nothing with which we can compare it among living creatures. Birds have the thing which is most treasured of all senses—sight—so highly developed that there is nothing with which we can compare it among living ...Read More...
OK. It's grammatically OK but doesn't really fit there. I understand. Thanks, Rachel!Read More...

whomever

That action will be good everywhere and by whomever performed . If the sentence above were changed to these, would they still make sense? (1) That action will be good everywhere and by whomever it is performed . (2) That action will be good everywhere and whoever performs it . (3) That action will be good everywhere and by anyone who performs it .Read More...
So now you don't think my #3 doesn't really work? And if the 'by' in my #1 (and the sentence in question, the one without 'it is' ) indicates the doer, how does 'by whomever' relates to the sentence in front? 'Everywhere' is an adverb, so it modifies the sentence (or more specifically 'be good'). But what about 'by...'? It relates to the action 'performed' described afterwards. Then how does it relate to the sentence in front?Read More...

what's up with

Dear experts, Would you agree with the definition 1 of the expression WHAT'S UP WITH as given in the Learner's Dictionary here: http://www.learnersdictionary.com/search/what 1. what is the reason for (something) ▪ (So) what's with the hat? [=why are you wearing that hat?] ▪ He told me to go away. What's up with that? [=why did he do that?] Whereas meaning 2 (what is wrong with) is common enough. Thank you, YuriRead More...
Yes, I do agree. 'What's with' can mean 'what's up with.' However, I think that 'what's with' is much less frequent, and may be...I am not sure of this... a northeastern US urban usage.Read More...

energy and power

engfan
hello can i use energy and power interchangeably? i say solar energy is it possible to say solar power? you may say why doesn't he use a dictionary to look that up, but i trust you as you have different opinions ..Read More...
In many cases, energy and power can be synonyms, Engfan, but perhaps not all the time. It depends on the context. For example, when talking about electricity, the words are synonymous. If you're talking about a person, though, energy would be used for the person's strength or stamina, while power could be used to talk about the person's political influence. That's why I say the context is so important.Read More...

A life of bliss

- He lives quite a long way from me, but his family is near me and he visits often. Our first date and weekend together were amazing for me. We now talk every day and I am fairly convinced we are VERY well-suited for each other. We've both "joked" about how we need to quit our jobs and move to where the other is for a life of bliss. - Instead of saying "we are VERY well-suited for each other", can I say "we are very compatible" or "we are so right for each other"? By the way I think "where...Read More...
Yes, Nammy, those paraphrases are just fine. As for that last bit, I'm afraid your paraphrase doesn't work. That's not what the original means. He or she is saying that if they finally decide to live together, they'll have a life of bliss.Read More...

chemist

engfan
hi i would like to know how chemist is pronounced is it tshemist or kemist? is the word pharmacist used widely in english-speaking countries? thanksRead More...
First, you need to understand that a chemist is a person; a chemist's is a pharmacy. I'm not quite sure what your last question means, my friend. If you want to know whether or not people can get their photos developed at a chemist's/pharmacy, it gets a little confusing. In the US, a pharmacy is usually the area inside a drugstore or even some supermarkets where prescriptions can be filled for customers. So it would be more accurate for me to say that in the US, people can get their photos...Read More...

four-letter word?

Hi, four-letter word I wonder why they are called so. Is it becuase all the offensive and rude words are comprised of four letters? I don't think so. Or is it because they go under the umbrella of the main word f**k which contains four letters? My hunch goes with my second interpretation. Am I right?Read More...
I see. Thanks a lot, Richard.Read More...

stand

Dear President Kim, before you stand a historic choice: you can either (A) join the family of nations, opening the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK) to economic benefits, new trading relationships and diplomatic recognition from Washington, or (B) you can continue down the road of isolation and penury if you continue to develop nuclear weapons Does 'stand' mean 'accept'? Thank youRead More...
I'm pretty sure that words is supposed to be stand s , my friend. There's a typo. This is the verb to stand in the 3rd person singular to agree with the subject a historic choice . In other words, we can make it more conversational and say A historic choice stands before you.Read More...

just to

I just got an email from a friend who said "just to wish you a merry christmas and happy new year". Can you say "just to" instead of "just wanted to"?Read More...
I think just to here is a shortcut, a shorter way of saying something like I'm sending this to you just to wish you a merry Christmas and happy new year. Saying just wanted to is only short for I just wanted to ...Read More...

Concrete answers

- I then tell her how much I honestly love her, and she says nothing or she'll bring up some gruesome details from my past. I'll pour my heart out! She doesn't offer a glimmer of hope or says she's not ready for a relationship or that we need to become better friends? This has been going on for a good year now and I'm at my emotional wits end. I don't want to lose her, but I feel I'm entitled to some concrete answers. The best she ever says is that every once in awhile she states that she...Read More...
It means he thinks he should be given some detailed and specific answers to the questions he has.Read More...

shipping

Which is the correct and more natural way to ask the question? 1. How much does it cost for shipping to Milan? 2. How much do you charge for shipping to Milan? 3. What is the shipping fee to Milan?Read More...
The most natural question probably is How much does it cost to ship to Milan?Read More...

Hardly ever

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Please tell me if the inversion can be used with "hardly ever" with the meaning of "never"? -I hardly ever eat breakfast at a restaurant. => Hardly ever do I eat breakfast at a restaurant. Thanks.Read More...
These sentences are both correct grammatically. However, 'hardly ever' does not mean 'never,' although it is close in meaning. It means 'almost never,' or 'very, very rarely.'Read More...

Is make or break

The occasion is, by definition, make or break. Can 'is make or break' use together? Thank youiRead More...
Hello, Welkins: 'Make or break' is an expression. Here's the definition from the American Heritage Dictionary: Resulting in great success or utter failure: a make-or-break investment plan. In other words, the action is very risky. It will either be a big success OR will ruin the investment plan.Read More...

Get myself across

- I'm wondering if I'm out of line with my continued enthusiasm about her. I try to move on but cannot shake her. I speak to my friends about her and they assure me that I'm clearly in love with her. I wish I know a way to get myself across, but can't seem to find the right way to accomplish this! - What do "I'm out of line with my continued enthusiasm" and "to get myself across" mean in this context? Thanks a lot to moderators! NamcoolguyRead More...
Hello, Namcoolguy: I'm out of line = I am excessive, I am acting inappropriately. with my continued enthusiasm = I continue to be crazy about her. To get myself across = to express my wants and desires in a way that is not only acceptable, but effective. So the sentences together mean that the speaker is acting inappropriately by being so super-enthusiastic about the girl (it's probably bothersome to her), and he wishes he could communicate his love for her in a way that she would accept him.Read More...

tense

Would you please advise me with the suitable tense for the following sentence and say Why: - She (read) a lot before she goes to the university in September. Thank youRead More...
This sentence is possible if it's her habit to do the reading every year, probably over the summer, before she goes to the university in September. As Richard has pointed out, the 'in September' part does not influence the main verb in this sentence.Read More...

wait on

Dear experts, Will it be possible to use WAIT ON instead of WAIT FOR in the following sentences: While WAITING ON his brother to return home, he killed some time by walking through a graveyard, looking at the names. I walked back and told him I’d tell him where to stop for the bus (which was already WAITING ON him). She stopped as she reached the top and turned to WAIT ON the slower paced horse. Thank you, YuriRead More...
I think so, Okaasan. I feel that the use of 'wait on' is spreading. Although I myself haven't used it, I hear it a lot around me, more than I used to, it seems.Read More...

truly/duly

Hi, are truly and duly adjective, tooRead More...
When a word modifies an adjective, it's an adverb, so truly is an adverb because it's modifying the adjective happy . Another way to tell it's an adverb is that the vast majority of adverbs end in -ly . The adjective is true , the adverb is truly .Read More...

On occasion

- I have spoken with her on occasion, sent emails, and cards. I have expressed my deepest apologies for my ill behavior and have told her I was willing to do anything to amend my wrongs. I get so many mixed signals from her! I've told her flat out that it might be best that we part ways so she can find a man that she truly loves who can treat her right, but then she says that's not what she wants to do. - What do "on occasion" and "part ways" mean here? Thanks so much to moderators! NamcoolguyRead More...
on occasion: occasionally, from time to time, once in awhile part ways: separate, go in different directionsRead More...

to infinive and perfect infinitive

cocoricot
Dear teachers, I am confusing about using simple infintive (to infinitive) and perfect infinitive (to have + past participle)when rewriting the sentence: "We expected that the report will be published shortly." I was made to rewrite this sentence beginning with "The report ..." I think it will be done like that: "The report was expected to be published shortly" I wonder when it would be: "The report was expected to have been published shortly." Thank you very much.Read More...
Thank you, Coco! Happy holidays and a very happy new year to you!Read More...

"an attached file" vs. "attached a file"

"Please find attached a file." This sentence sounds awkard to me because of word order. I think "Please find an attached file." is correct. "articel + adjective + noun" is correct order, isn't it? But my Australian friend says "Please find attached a file." is correct. (1) Both of the sentences are correct? (2) How can you expalin "Please find attached a file."?Read More...
Thank you very much.Read More...

used for used to

engfan
A pen is used to write. A pen is used for writing. what is it used for? what is it used to? Is the last question correct? please helpRead More...
As Okaasan says, we'd never ask the question What is this used to ? That question will always use for . Here's a link to a former posting that might help if you need to understand more about the distinction between to/in order to and for , Engfan: http://thegrammarexchange.info...=313104952#313104952Read More...

drinks

When we order drinks, will it be more natural and common to say "three coffees, two teas and two hot waters" than "three cups of coffee, two cups of tea and two glasses of hot water"?Read More...
Yes, it is really much more natural in restaurants -- high-end ones as well as fast-food ones -- to ask for coffees, teas, milks, etc. It is perfectly correct in this situation.Read More...
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