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word order

'Travelling at triple the speed' I thought "at the triple speed" is correct order, but "at triple the speed" is commonly used. And what about this? "Please find attached a file" I have learned that [article + adjective + noun] is correct order. But when I wrote "Please find an attached file", my Australian friend changed it to "Please find attached a file". Is there any rule about it?Read More...
'At triple the speed' is correct. 'Triple' is shown in the LDOCE as an adjective: three times more than a particular number: The rail system has triple the average number of accidents . You can also say, 'At triple speed.' Here are examples from the LDOCE: having three parts or involving three groups, people, events etc [↪ double]: a triple murder investigation a triple bill of horror movies the triple world champion a triple bypass heart operation We just don't say at the triple speed.' If...Read More...

boring vs bored

http://www.nydailynews.com/gos..._my_social_life.html Can we say "I feel so boring" instead of "I feel so bored"?Read More...
I can't understand why that person is using boring in this context, Alex. I feel so boring means that she feels she bores others, that she has nothing of interest to say. She could also say I'm a boring person. If she means that she doesn't have anything of interest for her to do, she should say I feel so bored. It seems to me that using bored would be more appropriate here.Read More...

This is so [too] big a car.

I'd appreciate it if someone would answer my question. Thanks in advance. Concerning the sentence, This is so [too] big a car. I don't understand why "a" is at such a place, though "a" is usually placed before adjective or adverb as in "This is a very big car". Please give me the explanation.Read More...
Thank you very much.Read More...

mango

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Please tell me which is correct: 1. My favorite fruit is a mango. 2. My favorite fruit is mangoes. 3. My favorite fruit is mango. Thanks.Read More...
I would choose no. 1, but I can imagine no. 2 as acceptable as well. The problem with no. 3 is that when we use the name of the fruit without either an article or the plural form, we're really talking about flavor , not an actual piece of fruit: A: What's your favorite ice cream? B: Mango. A: Mango? Gee, I didn't know they make mango ice cream. I'll have to try some.Read More...

"not to" or "in order not to"

Dear teachers, When we make a negative infinitive, we normally put "not" before to. Try not to be late. However, someone told me that I should not say (A) but (B). Is he right? (A) I spoke quietly not to frighten her. (X) (B) I spoke quietly so as not to frighren her. (O)Read More...
Dear Rachel, Thank you for the reply. Could you tell what you mean by "almost"? Do you mean (A) is a grammatically possible expression but (B) is better?Read More...

go walk/walk

Hello, I would like to say that it possible to go around the island. Can I say; 1. I can walk around the island for a day. 2. I can go walk around the island. Are they both correct? Any difference? Thanks a lot!^^ Iwtk LOVES GE!!Read More...
Saying either I can walk or I can go walk is okay, Iwtk, although I can walk is probably better form. What I can't figure out, though, is what you mean in no. 1 when you say "... for a day." If you mean it takes a whole day to walk completely around the island, you should say in a/one day. If you mean this a way to spend a specific day, you should say for the day.Read More...

What Does "Office" Mean?

(1) I am, by virture of the laws of the state of indiana,the custodian of the corporate records and the proper office to execute this certificate. What is the and -coordination all about? The custodian of x and y? (2) Certificate of Good Standing I do thereby certify that XXX(company) a company duly organized and existing under and by virtue of the Laws of The Cayman Islands is at the date of this certificate in Good Standing with the office , and duly authorized to exercise therein all the...Read More...
'Office' in this sentence means 'representative of a government department' There should be a comma after 'records' to indicate that the speaker is the custodian...and the office (the representative of the government department). 'And' links 'custodian' and 'office,' which are parallel. _______ 'Good standing with the office' means that the company is officially OK and complies with the rules and regulations of the government agency. There are no outstanding law suits or sanctions against...Read More...

A lot more earlier

Dear Richard and Rachel! - I got this passage from an English learning website: - I used to be a night owl when I was a student, staying up until about 4 o'clock in the morning, writing essays, drinking lots of coffee but I'm finding as I'm getting older, I can't do it. I have to go to bed, so nowadays I'm up a lot more earlier in the morning and I think I'm more productive in the morning. - I guess "a lot" is used here to emphasize for "more earlier", right? and "more productive" here means...Read More...
'More earlier' is incorrect,Namcoolguy. As you know, adjectives are compared using either 'more' + the adjective ( more active ) or with the -er ending at the end of the adjective smaller . We don't use both 'more' and the -er ending with the same word. Two-syllable adjectives and adverbs like early normally take the -er ending, as in busier, easier and earlier, . The word here should be earlier , not more early. . _______ 'Productive' in this sense means that the speaker accomplishes more,...Read More...

early morning person

- I'm more of an early morning person. I wake up about 10 o'clock, which is quite late, I think, I guess, but when I wake up, I feel really refreshed and I'm ready to go to class and I'm awake and listening to the lecturer, but then by about 3 o'clock in the afternoon, I need a knap. I get so exhausted that after classes and sports and things,and then I have a ten minute knap in the afternoon and then at about 12 o'clock I'll go to sleep. - What does "I'm more of an early morning person"...Read More...
Wow! I don't know where this passage comes from, Nammy, but it's very poorly written, to say the least. First, the writer contradicts himself at the beginning. He says he's "more of an early morning person," which means he usually wakes up early in the morning and prefers that. But then he says he wakes up at about 10 o'clock, which is not early in the morning at all. Second, you're right that the word is spelled nap , not knap . Finally, you're right in saying that "I get so exhausted that...Read More...

it

It's good when he works hard. If the sentence above were converted to this, would it still make the same sense? When he works hard is good. I have a feeling that it doesn't really work, but I'm not sure on this one.Read More...
Just as I thought! Thanks, Rachel.Read More...

Truth Statements & Modal Will/Must

(1) Oil floats on water. (2) Oil will float on water. (3) If oil is mixed with water, it floats. (4) If you pour oil on water, it will float. (5) oil must float on water. (6) if oil is mixed with water, it must float. I understand the first four, but can we say (5) & (6)? If yes, is there any difference between the will-sentences and the must-sentences? Between the simple present tense sentences and the must-sentences? According to dictionaries, "must" may indicate inevitability, or "be...Read More...
The semantic difference I perceive between All people will die and All people must die is that the former is making a prediction, while the latter is talking about an inevitable outcome. The same difference holds true, I think, with the other two sentences.Read More...

it takes a lot of money?

Dear experts, It's been a long time since I asked you questions last time but you are always there for me to turn to. Really, thank you. Well, my question is: Do people say " It takes a lot of money to hold Olympic games" ? Or, do people say " It costs a lot of money to hold Olypic games"? I mean, can you put "money" after "take" or you have to put something else too. For example, "It takes a lot of energy and money to fulfill such a mission." Thank you. JoyceRead More...
It costs is used much more commonly than it takes , Joyce, when dealing with money matters, but both can be used. Here are some examples: How much will it cost/take to get those dental implants? It can take/cost more than most people have in the bank to send a kid to college in the US these days. This vacation will cost/take three weeks' salary, but it'll be worth every penny! The only time that you can't use take is when you're actually asking about the price of some product or service. For...Read More...

one minute... the next

Hi Rachel or Richard, Can you kindly take a look at these sentences and tell me what's not so right with them? 1 'One minute she was on firm ground, the next, she was falling down a big hole. ' 2 'Stones, some bottles and rusty cans cut her leg badly. Jane said she could see to the bone. ' Your time and trouble is greatly appreciated. Thanks a mil! GilbertRead More...
Thank you so much for clearing the air... Thanks Richard, Rachel & Izzy. GilbertRead More...

It seems not

Dear experts, The other day I read this sentence in an article. Is there any grammatical errors about "seems not" here? "It is a usual sunny afternoon in the village. It seems not unlike any afternoon." Many thanks. JoyceRead More...
Joyce, as Okaasan said in his post, "not" here goes with "unlike", not with "seems." "Not unlike" means more or less the same as "like". It is known as understatement, if I'm not mistaken. (I'm not an expert: I have more questions than answers.)Read More...

as and like

engfan
what is the difference ?Read More...
Hegga, do you mean this: What is the difference between 'like' and 'as'? The Grammar Exchange has addressed this question previously. Take a look at the attachment below for an answer.Read More...

semi-vowels?

Hi, Is it because that the 'y' and 'w' are semi-vowels that they are not doubled when adding 'ing', for example? Playying , sayying, sawwing BTW, why are they called semi-vowels but not semi-consonant?Read More...
Crystal clear! Thanks a lot, my friendRead More...

Which

He made a face to a child which was in her mother's arm. Can I use 'which' in the sentece cabove? Thank youRead More...
The sentence should be He made a face at a child that was in its mother's arm s . You make a face at somebody, Welkins. You don't use which for people. - Use who or that for people and that for animals and you won't go wrong. - Reserve which for things. If we don't know a baby's gender, it's proper to use the possessive adjective its . Believe it or not, this isn't an insult! We normally say that a person holds a baby in his/her arms (the plural).Read More...

By and large

- I function the best in the morning, so I would have to say I'm an early bird. I can stay up late and I enjoy doing that now and then but by-and-large, more often than not, I do my best work in the morning. I can get up early and don't really complain too much about it, so I'm an early bird. - Can I say "for the most part" or "generally" instead of "by-and-large"? By the way what does the speaker mean by "more often than not"? Thanks so much to moderators! NamcoolguyRead More...
Yep, Nammy, you can substitute by and large with those options. The phrase more often than not means "usually."Read More...

talk about something

Dear experts, the expression TALK ABOUT SOMETHING may be used to emphasize the significance of the thing mentioned as in: Did you see the film last night? TALK ABOUT laugh! I’ve never laughed so much in my life. May SPEAK ABOUT be used in similar contexts? Thank you, YuriRead More...
Hi, Yuri: I don't think so. I've used only and heard only 'talk about...'Read More...

lead

1. The little girl lost her bearings in the woods and didn't know which way leaded to her home. 2. The little girl lost her bearings in the woods and didn't know which way leaded home. 3. The little girl lost her bearings in the woods and didn't know which way was home. Would you tell me which one is correct?Read More...
Thank you, Okaasan.Read More...

Easterly News

- I got these in an English book: Easterly News Wire Service Minneapolis, Minesota Lake Street Middle School wil begin its fall fundraiser today. Boys and girls from Lake Street Middle School will be sending candy and raffle tickets for their annual trip to Washington, D.C. - The tittle has nothing to do with the paragraph, so I really don't understand the three words "Easterly News Wire", could you please let me know their meanings in this context? Thanks very much to moderators! NamcoolguyRead More...
A news wire service is a company that distributes news stories to various newspapers, Nammy. It's not the title of this article; it's just identifying the source of the story. Two very famous news wire services are Reuters and Associated Press (AP). By the way, I think you were typing too quickly, my friend. The second sentence should be Boys and girls from Lake Street Middle school will be selling candy and raffle tickets ...Read More...
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