All Forum Topics

not only cook

Person 1: Can you cook? - Can I answer person 1's question like this? "person 2: I can not only cook, but also I can cook very well." Thanks a lot to moderators! NamcoolguyRead More...
I think it would sound more natural for Person 2 to say Not only can I cook, but I can cook very well!Read More...

pronoun I

engfan
Tom and I went to the zoo. WHY DON'T WE SAY I and Tom went to the zoo. please help....thanks a lotRead More...
A very interesting response, Tony C. By the way, would you tell us which country you are from?Read More...

As to / as for

mengxin2009
Hello,forum Could you please give me some examples of "as to and as for"? I mean those examples in which they are exchangeable and unexchangeable? Many many thanks.Read More...
That’s nice, Tony C. You have pretty much condensed what I was about to copy in a rather long passage from Fowler.* There is a little more, though. First, in general, ‘as to’ and ‘as for’ are often interchangeable. But not always. Here are definitions from two dictionaries. -From the Merriam-Webster Unabridged: • as to prep. 1. With regard to: We are puzzled as to how it happened. 2. According to: candidates who were chosen as to ability. idioms: 1. According to, as in They were asked to...Read More...

too small/ young/ little

mengxin2009
Hello everyone, In terms of age, what's the difference if I say: How can I do it? I am ____. 1. too small 2. too young 3. too little And are they all correct? Many many thanks in advance.Read More...
Of course 2 is the best answer, Mengxin, but 3 is also possible when dealing with age. When we say a little boy / a little girl we're talking exclusively about age, not size. That's why no. 1 won't work. No. 1 deals with size.Read More...

since - after

He's been off work ---- Tuesday. A) since B) after I know A is OK. What about B? Is it wrong? If so, what makes it wrong?Read More...
The problem with the phrase after Tuesday is that it doesn't imply "from Tuesday to now," and that's what it needs to do if it's to be used together with the present perfect ( has been ). That's why we need to use since , which means "from Tuesday to now."Read More...

with/having

With a family as big as mine, it takes over an hour just to wash the dishes. Could I substitute "having" for "with" like this: Having a family as big as mine, it takes over an hour just to wash the dishes. Thanks.Read More...
I don't think so, Jey. Because IT can't be the subject of HAVING.Read More...

nearly / almost

mengxin2009
____ no one came to the party. I know I should use almost instead of nearly here. But why nearly is wrong here? I can only use it by rote? Many thanks in advance.Read More...
I did a search on Google Books and found 619 results with nearly no one . And nearly = almost (according to LDOCE) nearlyRead More...

Inferiority complex

- Mark has inferiority complex because he just has a bachelor's degree and I have a Master's degree. That's why he doesn't want to date me. - Does this sentence sound natural? Thanks so much to moderators! NamcoolguyRead More...
It sounds natural enough, Nammy, but there are a few tweaks that should be made: Mark has an inferiority complex. He just has a bachelor's degree , but I have a master's. That's why he doesn't want to date me.Read More...

had fished; had been fishing

A: How was your weekend? B: Not great, actually. I'd really been looking forward to a ralaxing couple of days. But early on Saturday morning Mun phoned me to say that Dad had been taken ill. A: Oh, no! What had happened? B: She had just heard that he had flwon by helicopter to hospital in Edinburgh from a village called Contin where he ________ with my uncle Mark. A: And is he OK? What's wrong with him? B: Well, Uncle Mark said that Dad had been complaining of a bad headahce most of...Read More...
My choice is b , Kis. Using the past perfect progressive lets us know that this was an activity not yet finished. It shows us that their visit to Contin was interrupted and it gives us the impression that they would probably have continued fishing had Speaker B's father not been taken to the hospital. I think the main reason I don't like a is that we normally don't say people fish; we prefer to say they go fishing when referring to the sport or the pastime. If the sentence were ... from a...Read More...

asking about price

engfan
can i say " what is the cost of this shirt?Read More...
Yes, that's one way. You can also say: How much does this shirt cost? How much is the shirt? How much is it? How much? What's the price of this shirt? What's the price?Read More...

it is salty

engfan
if the food is full of salt we say it is salty what do we say if it is out of salt? can i say it is bitter or we use bitter for drinks onlyRead More...
I think we would say: It needs salt. It is flavorless. 'Bitter' would not apply to a lack of salt. Here's 'bitter' referring to flavor, from the LDOCE: having a sharp strong taste like black coffee without sugar [↪ sour; sweet]: Enjoy the beer's bitter taste as you slowly drink it. bitter chocolateRead More...

show sympathy

engfan
what would i say when i go to show sympathy to someone whose father or mother died. can i say " the rest in your life"? this is the translation of what we say in Arabic What would he or she reply? Would he say "it can"t be helped"?Read More...
hi rachel the rest in your life means you will complete alone ....you will complete what he or she was doing....you are extention to himRead More...

history book

Hi, a history book or an history book? Iknow a history book is correct but somewhere write an history book is correct, too? thank youRead More...
Only the names of letters that have a vowel sound at the beginning. We would say, for example: an A a B a C... an F (an ef) .. an H (an aitch)... etc.Read More...

adverbs of manner and degree

engfan
is it ok to say 1-" he treats me fatherly or in a fatherly way" 2- he runs quick or quickly i think they are both right what do you think? he is absolutely\extremely good do we use absolutely or extremely only with strong adjectivesRead More...
1- He treats me in a fatherly way . The word fatherly is only an adjective, Hegga, so you can't use it as an adverb. That's why He treats me fatherly doesn't work. 2- You can use quick or quickly , although I, for one, prefer quickly . 3- He is extremely good. Even though I think it's technically okay to say absolutely good , this just doesn't seem like a commonly used collocation, my friend. We use absolutely to intensify many adjectives, but I don't think good is normally one of them.Read More...

funny enough to make a cat laugh

engfan
Funny enough to make a cat laugh this expression was mentioned in a short story by george sheffield for secondary school students(year1)..... is it a real expression or was it the writer's own creation? thanks for helpRead More...
All I can say, Hegga, is that I've never heard the expression. I did a Google search and found 1,200 instances of the expression being used. Considering the large volume that Google is capable of showing, this seems like a very, very small number, so I'd say that although the expression obviously exists, it isn't used by very many people.Read More...

can wear

You can wear no helmet when you are driving one of these cars. Can't this sentence mean two things: 1-You cannot wear any helmets when you are driving one of these cars. 2-You don't have to wear helmets when you are driving one of these cars.Read More...
Another odd sentence, my friend. At any rate, the interpretation in no. 1 is correct (except helmet should be singular). The interpretation in no. 2 doesn't work, Navi. Don't have to means "not necessary," and that's not the idea conveyed by cannot . Cannot in certain contexts means "not allowed," but neither this meaning nor "aren't able to" works in this idea.Read More...

can pupils in class call me teacher or not?

engfan
in egypt pupils call teachers teacher+name of the teacherRead More...
Here's something else: what about adult students calling you by your first name? I think this is quite usual in US colleges and universities now, in intensive English programs. When I first started teaching many, many years ago, students always called teachers 'Mr.' or 'Mrs.' The men always wore ties to class, too. In recent years, it seems natural to use our first names in our classes. Years ago, I would not have thought this possible, but I became and am comfortable with this. How about...Read More...

desperate

that man looks desperate. he was looking desperately. i think we should have "desperately" in the first sentence tooRead More...
When we use look as a stative verb to mean "appear/seem," we use an adjective after it as you have in your first sentence. We're not descibing how he's doing something; we're describing his appearance, and that's why we use an adjective here, my friend. Your second sentence is another way of using look as a stative verb. There's a change going on in English nowadays involving the use of the progressive form more and more with some stative verbs. This trend may end up changing what is...Read More...

Sneakily dating

- Yesterday my heart almost stopped beating when I saw with my own eyes my three-year girlfriend sneakily dating with my best friend. - Is this sentence grammatical? Thanks a lot to moderators! NamcoolguyRead More...
It's not that your sentence is ungrammatical, my friend; it's that your sentence isn't idiomatic and native-like. Here's how a native speaker might express this idea: Yesterday my heart almost stopped beating when I saw ( caught ) the girl I had been dating for three years two-timing me with my best friend.Read More...

sound or sounds?

Hello, I would like to know why ' sound ' is used here not ' sound s '. Is this just a typo? Matt : I am bored, so bored. Would you like to hang out with me tonight for some old movies and popcorn? Jeff : Sound like a good idea. What are we going to watch? I want to see a feel good movie. How about an old comedy movie? Say Home Alone? Thank you!^^Read More...
Aha! And that's why it's so important for us to see items like this in context or to see the passage that a particular item is in. That question mark makes all the difference. Thanks for posting the link, Tony!Read More...

generic articles

what is the difference between The lion is a wild animal A LION IS A WILD ANIMAL. lions are wild animals. Thank youRead More...
The point is, Elham, that you don't need to distinguish one from the other. All three work equally well. I just like to keep things simpe for students. I've learned over the years that giving them too much information at one time can overwhelm them and be counter-productive. That's why I'd start with A lion is a wild animal. Later on, I'd show them how they can use the plural nouns with the zero article for the same idea. The last thing I'd want them to learn is The lion is a wild animal.Read More...

shall shan't

engfan
are shall and shan't still used by english speakers in US and in Britain?Read More...
The LDOCE Online give a very thorough explanation for the modal auxiliary shall , Hegga. Click on this link to see this: http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/shall Besides what the LDOCE Online says in no. 1, I can add that we normally use shall in AmE for just this purpose of making suggestions or asking if it's okay to do something in a formal way. In addition, as the LDOCE Online points out, we use shall even in AmE in certain legal terms or in very formal statements. For example, it's...Read More...

singular/plural

Hi, PLease correct me: i should write the singular form of 1-some cargoes of bananas are: a cargo of bananas is 2- some sheep were grazing a sheep was greazing 3-some alumni were an alumna was 4- some crises a crisis Thank youRead More...
Right you are, my friend! We can't leave out those female graduates.Read More...

leaves

it says for familiar words we should use "the" why do we use "the" for this sentence. THE leaves are already falling off THE trees and covering THE ground. we know the ground but not which tree i think leaves are aready falling off trees and covering the ground?Read More...
sorry, thank you RachelRead More...

adding negatives with besides??

Hi Are the following sentences correct?? I am not excluding the items with besides; I am just adding them to the negation? - Besides Mr. Jordan I didn't see Tony, or Sam.(I din't see any of them) - Besides apples, I don't like grapes.( I don't like either) - Besides Brazil, Germany and Holland didn't qualify to the finals.(none of the three teams qualified)Read More...
The sentences are not clear.If you want to say ' not including' -- which you don't -- you would start the sentence with 'Apart from' or 'except for.' 'Besides' is ambiguous. For your meaning, you could say: In addition to Mr. Jordan... In addition to apples... In addition to Brazil... OR I didn't see Mr. Jordan, or Tony or Sam, either. I don't like apples, and I don't like grapes either. Brazil didn't qualify, and Germany and Holland didn't either. _______ So in answer to your question, no,...Read More...
×
×
×
×