All Forum Topics

expected/expecting

cocoricot
Dear teachers, Please tell me which is correct, "expected" or "expecting"? "It is not expected/expecting to learn a foreign language in a week." Thank you.Read More...
Thank you, Richard.Read More...

It is necessary + gerund

Dear teachers, It is common in English to use it as a preparatory subject when an infinitive is the subject of a sentence. It is necessary to wear a tie. I also understand this rule is comparatively uncommon in a gerund. Then, how about the following examples? Do they sound very awkward? I would like to know the degree of the unacceptability of the expressions. (A) It is necessay wearing a tie. (B) It is necessary being registered on this forum. In (B), I intentionally took the form of a...Read More...
Dear Rachel, I am sorry for my belated thank you. This is a very tough subject to me. I also found the following example in LDCE. It's tough being married to a cop. My agony is why some adjectives can take the form of "it is ... doing" and the others can't. It is one of the hardest parts of English for me. When there is no clear rule, it is not easy for a foreigner like me to simply memorize them as an idiomatic usage. Anyway, I need to dig it some more. Thank you for your advice once again.Read More...

sound

Simon has been practicing the song for days. It ________ quite good, but he doesn't think he's ready yet to perform it in public. a. is sounding b. sounds Are they both correct? if so, which is more natural? Thanks!Read More...
'Sounds' is good, but today a lot of people would also use 'is sounding.' It's not incorrect.Read More...

look

I hear you're having your house repainted. _________ . a. How's it looking ? B. How does it look? Are they both correct? If so, which is more natural? Thanks!Read More...
Mido is right, but 'How's it looking' is also correct. It's informal, and actually more modern. It looks like these are questions from a test in which the testers are trying to get the test takers to distinguish between the simple and the progressive forms with normally non-action verbs. This is not a good idea to test in this way, since usage is way ahead of most texts with the appearance of many of these verbs in the progressive form in many, many situations.Read More...

feel

I won't be coming to work today. ____________ . a. I'm not feeling very well b. I don't feel very well Are they both correct? If so, which is more natural? Thanks!Read More...
Yes, both are perfectly correct.Read More...

find

__________ it difficult to concentrate on your work with this music on? a. Do you find b. Are you finding Are they both correct? If so, which is more natural? Thanks!Read More...
Yes, both are perfectly correct.Read More...

Down

Here is a horse down the castle. Am I correctly using 'down'? Thank youRead More...
There's a horse down the road that leads to the castle.Read More...

ordering of adjectives

I wonder if there is a rule as to how adjectives are arranged? It seems to me it's always "size", "color", "pattern" then "material". For example, 1. "a little black dress" instead of "a black little dress" 2. "a loose cotton shirt" instead of "a cotton loose shirt" 3. "a pink checked skirt" instead of "a checked pink skirt"Read More...
The simple way to remember when a comma is needed is if there are two real adjectives in a row. Both beautiful and large are real adjectives; hence the comma. In the phrase a French cotton tablecloth , we have a nationality followed by a material. These aren't considered real adjectives, so there's no need for a comma between them.Read More...

inversion

Which are correct: 1-Not even ten years ago you could see such a film. 2-Not even ten years ago could you see such a film. 3-You couldn't see such a film even ten years ago.Read More...
Changing my sentence to begin with "Even 10 years ago" also changes the meaning I was discussing at the beginning of my last post. I give up.Read More...

would/could

Mary : I don't know why some people are so stubborn. Tom : What's gotten you so worked up? Mary : I'm reading what the supposed health minister of South Africa is saying about the AIDS crisis. She's telling people that garlic and lemon are perfectly good cures for HIV. Tom : That's ridiculous. How 'd she get the job of health minister if she knows so little about medicine? Is the bold verb would or could ? Thanks a lot!Read More...
I think the -'d stands for 'did': 'How did she get...' However, it could also stand for 'would,' which would also be OK, even though the sentence would probably be, 'How would she have gotten ...' The reduced form -d does not stand for 'could.' For that we'd have to say: 'How could she get.../ How could she have gotten...'Read More...

other

I heard the ad campaign has spread to others parts of the U.K. as well as Spain, Italy, Canada, and the U.S. Is others correct in the sentence? I think it should be other .Read More...
Yes, Jey, it should be other , without the S. That's because in this case, other is an adjective, modifying parts. . The campaign has spread to other parts of... It's normal for adjectives not to have the plural marker S, even when the adjectives modify plural nouns, like parts . The word others , as you know, exists. It's not an adjective, though. It's a pronoun. It stands alone, like this: Some people eat a lot; others eat only a little. Some cats are friendly; others are not. Some houses...Read More...

regarding

Which are correct: 1-I have some friends regarding whom I don't know whether they are alive or not. 2-I have some friends concerning whom I don't know whether they are alive or not. 3-I have some friends about whom I don't know whether they are alive or not. 4-There are friends of mine I don't know whether they are alive or not.Read More...
Never on our nerves, Navi. Just in our hearts! These two sentences are OK. They are much different from the originals that you sent. And, by the way, if you do work with those difficult sentences, 'who' would be the pronoun to work with, not 'whom.' You are right.Read More...

Get done

- I own a small grocery store. I do everything from running the cash register to cutting meat. If it has to get done in a store, I get to do it. On most days I like it. - What does "get done" mean here? And what does "it" refer to? Thanks so much to moderators! NamcoolguyRead More...
That's why I had that other interpretation of the line. Whatever the task, it falls upon the speaker's shoulders to deal with it.Read More...

Fueled

The leader's comment on the event fueled his counterpart with anger. Am I correctly using 'fueled'? Thank youRead More...
Yes, but the last part of the sentence needs to be tweaked: The leader's comment on the event fueled his counterpart's anger .Read More...

Remained

Leaving the town for a mile, the dog remained following us. Am I correctly using 'remained'? Thank youRead More...
For this idea, we use keep , Welkins ( the dog kept following us ). But I'm afraid that the first part of your sentence doesn't make sense. Think about it: You cannot "leave a place for a mile." What does that mean? I think what you're trying to say is Even though we'd gone a mile out of town, the dog kept following us.Read More...

while/progressive or simple?

Hi Which is the correct tense in the following as I see that both are correct? - - One clown was juggling while he (was balance/balanced) a glass of wine on his head.Read More...
Rachel, this is what an advanced grammar book has to say about this: When two actions happen simultaneously and each of them doesn't affect the other the progressive can be with the two verbs, with either , or with neither: - He was watching TV while his wife was washing the dishes. - He watched TV while his wife washed the dishes. - He watched TV while his wife was washing the dishes. - He was watching TV while his wife washed the dishes. That what made me choose both answers in my previous...Read More...

Need and delay

1)The case need further investigation before the district attorney took it. 2)The case delayed because the detective was overwhelmed with work. Am I correctly using 'delayed' and 'need'? Thank youRead More...
Nope. Here are the corrections: 1)The case need ed further investigation before the district attorney took it. 2)The case was delayed because the detective was overwhelmed with work.Read More...

noun clause (2)

___________ is true. (add noun clause) what i said what i have done everything she said i need realy that which kinds of noun clause we can here? is (boiling water in 100 degree) a noun clause?Read More...
No, I didn't say that. In your original, boiling is NOT a gerund, my friend. It's a participle, but, as I said, the sentence doesn't make sense the way you have written it. Here's an example with a gerund: Boiling water at sea level is easier to accomplish than boiling water at high altitudes.Read More...

purpose clause

Are these sentences both correct: 1-I brought the documents for you to examine. 2-I brought the documents for you to examine them . I think there is a slight difference in their meanings. In 1 'for you to examine' postmodifies the noun 'the documents' and tells us what documents we are talking about and in 2 we know what documents we are talking about but 'for you to examine them ' is a sentence adverbial and shows what my purpose was in bringing those documents (I brought them so that you...Read More...
You are so kind Richard. Thanks.Read More...

venue, time, date

Am I correct to arrange the venue, time and date like this? "The next meeting will be held at conference room 101, 3:00pm, on Friday, December 4, 2009."Read More...
Yes, but I'd say in conference room 101 at 3:00 p.m. ... The periods on pm are optional by some standards. I prefer to use them. Conference room could be capitalized.Read More...

Landscaped patio

- This four-bedroom, two-bathroom home is ready for your family. Features include a new roof, a new hot water heater, a new air conditioning unit, a landscaped patio. - I know the meanings of "landscape" and "patio", but what does "landscaped mean in this situation? Thanks a lot to moderators! NamcoolguyRead More...
Nice photo there, Richard! I wouldn't mind having a place like that! Namcoolguy, a yard and a patio are not the same. A yard is the land around (and belonging to) a house. A patio is usually paved and is usually adapted for dining outdoors. So it is a part of a yard (unless you have a very small yard that is all patio). Since the patio is designed for dining, it is usually in the back so that it is more private. A patio (like a yard) may or not be landscaped. It might be just a paved area...Read More...

/r/ sound?

Hi, I would like to check if this is correct. While examining a number if words where the sound [r] occurs in the middle or at the end of a word , at least in the BrE, I noticed that it is not preceded by a short vowel. Rather a long vowel or diphthong precedes. examples: sir, dear, power, beard, bird, bear, occur, tear, air, ceremony, ear, fear, gear, hear, ire, etc. I wonder if that's true. If not, please give me some examples that prove that opposite.Read More...
Thanks.Read More...

one

Have you seen the atheist ads on all the buses? I just came to work on one and it seems the ads have sparked raging debates about religion. Does the bold one mean one of the buses ? I just came to work on one of the buses and... Thanks!Read More...
Yes, Jey.Read More...

which

Are these sentences correct: 1-When, which happened all the time, they forgot to do what they had to do, they came up with strange excuses. 2-First of all, which might seem strange, they never talked about their families.Read More...
I don't think so. I think these clauses beginning with 'which' are sentence modifiers. They should go at the end of the clause they modify, as in the first sentence, or at the end of the sentence, as in the second sentence: When they forgot to do what they had to do, which happened all the time, they came up with strange excuses. First of all, they never talked about their families, which may seem strange.Read More...

Is the e in mother and father considered a silent letter?

Is the e in mother and father considered silent? How about the i in first? What about the a in arm? How about the e in personRead More...
Hi MaryLynn The e in mother, father and person is a schwa sound. The i in first is also a schwa sound. The a in arm is not silent either (but it is not a schwa sound). Words with a silent e would be "house" and "nice", for example.Read More...
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