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ones

1. Which apples do you want? . I want those red ones. 2. American universities are not necessarily better than British ones. Compare the two sentences above. I feel a bit strange with the way “ones” is used in sentence 2. Can it be that the sentence sounds more natural if you just repeat “universities”? Can “one(s)” be used for any countable nouns in any situations? Is it always preferable to avoid repeating the same noun twice? AppleRead More...
"Ones" is all right in both sentences. You could, of course, repeat "universities."Read More...

a or an?

Hello everyone! Should the article a or an precede the words " hp printer "? Thank you so very much. GilbertRead More...
Hello Mehrdad, Hello Rachel! Thank you, guys! An hp printer it is! Thanks for the link, Rachel. It was very enlightening. Bye! GilbertRead More...

such as

Is there a difference between the meanings of these sentences: 1-Modernist writers such as Joyce and Faulkner used the interior monologue. 2-Modernist writers , such as Joyce and Faulkner , used the interior monologue. Does 'such as' not mean 'like' in 1? The ones who were like Joyce and Faulkner. Does 'such as' not mean 'for instance' in 2?Read More...
Hello, Navi: In both sentence, 'such as' means 'for instance. Well, let me amend that: In the first sentence, 'such as' might mean 'like' or 'similar to.' The commas indicate a pause, as you know. You can disambiguate the first sentence like this: Modernist writers, (those) like Joyce and Faulkner,... Here's a posting about 'such as' that appeared on the GE: http://thegrammarexchange.info...361080863#5361080863 http://thegrammarexchange.info...40600179/m/231105154 And there's an an...Read More...

with

1. During the day I heard bees tunneling through the walls of my bedroom, sounding like a raio tuned to static in the next room, and I imagined them turning the walls into honeycombs, with honey seeping out for me to taste. Is it okay to change participial constructions in the above sentence in this way: During the day I heard bees tunneling through the walls of my bedroom and it sounded like a raio tuned to static in the next room, and I imagined them turning the walls into honeycombs and...Read More...
Oops! I overlooked the second sentence. Your paraphrase is grammatically fine, but it is not what the original sentence means. I would rewrite it this way: The actor took a nap while his teeth were clenched.Read More...

in / on mind

Hi teachers, Please correct the following: Now you are not IN / ON my mind. Please give me some examples of 'in mind' and 'on mind'. Thank you. PrashobhiniRead More...
Here's some ways to say those phrases. Okaasan is right: the tense is important to the naturalness of the phrases. Here are some that mean you haven't been thinking about someone, and they are not so polite; they are dismissive of the other person: You haven't been on my mind lately. You haven't been in my thoughts lately. I haven't been thinking about you lately. You aren't on my mind much. You haven't been in my thoughts lately. All of the above are negative statements about the person you...Read More...

lost my bag vs. have lost my bag

(1) He lost my bag. (2) He has lost my bag. I learned that the two sentences have different meaning. (1) means that he lost his bag in the past, but it is not known whether he found his bag or not. (2) means that he lost his bag and has not found it yet. But I wonder whether it is true because "he played the piano well" means he could play the piano well in the past, but cannot now.Read More...
You're right here. No, this is not the case. By saying that "John played the piano well last night," one could be describing sth that happened last night, and it is not still happening, for example. John might play the piano well again and again in his life, but the speaker was only describing what happened last night. Another example: "I went to Paris last year." This does not mean that I'll never go to Paris again!Read More...

than

Around one percent of the population stutters to some degree and men is four times more likely to stutter than women is to be stutterers. Is the above sentence correct? If not, could you tell me which part is unnatural? Thanks so much!Read More...
To have the least alteration of the original sentence, I would say: Around one percent of the population stutters to some degree , and men are four times more likely to stutter than women.Read More...

appeal made through / revert to you

Hi Moderators We refer to your appeal made through the Member of Parliament (MP) on 20 July. We will revert to you after we have assessed the appeal made on your behalf by the MP. 1. Is 'made' necessary? 2. I see 'revert' frequently used in a letter? Is it an appropriate word? Thanks in advance.Read More...
Rachel is correct. The "respond" meaning of "revert" seems recent. Here it is in a brand new dictionary! Also pay attention to IndE : Oxford Advanced Learner’s Dictionary, 8th edition re • vert BrE / rɪvɜt / NAmE / rɪvɜrt / verb [ intransitive ] (+ adv./prep.) ( IndE , rather formal ) to reply Excellent openings—kindly revert with your updated CV. We request you to kindly revert back if you have any further requirements. revert to sb/sth ( law ) ( of property, rights, etc. ) to return to the...Read More...

carefully

Can I say, (a) They are carefully crossing the road. (b) They are walking (on the road) carefully.Read More...
Both are grammatically fine. Adverbs of place usually come after adverbs of manner, so you could say: They are walking carefully on the road. And are they walking on the road or along the road?Read More...

about the whales

Can I say, (a) The whales are the largest. (b) The whales are the largest animals / mammals in sea. (c) The whales are the largest in the ocean.Read More...
(a) The whales are the largest animals / marine mammals. (b) The whales are the largest animals / mammals in sea. (c) The whales are the largest animals / mammals in the ocean.Read More...

picked / picked up

Do we say, She picked / picked up the flowers at the garden. P/s: picked here means plucked.Read More...
'Picked', not 'picked up'. 'Picked' as you say means 'plucked', but 'picked up' does not. It means 'removed from a surface'.Read More...

together

A typical living room with constituent furniture, carpets, curtains and so on is more ordered than a random collection of empty drawers, the items that were in them and everything else in the room together in a haphazard way. What does 'together' modify? 'Collection'?Read More...
Oddly written it may be. But if anything, what do you think it modifies, Amy? Isn't it a deverbal noun of 'collect something together'?Read More...

at the place

I found myself out in the street again at the place from which I had started. About 'at the place', is it a modifier of 'the street'? Or is it something else?Read More...
Hi Taka I'd say it functions exactly the same way that 'out in the street again' functions. It provides information about ' where I found myself'.Read More...

"When they wait" or "when they are waiting"

Please look at the following two sentences. Is sentence 1 somehow better than sentence 2? 1. People today seem to be unable to wait patiently. When they are waiting for a bus that is delayed, for example, they get restless in ten minutes or so. 2. People today seem to be unable to wait patiently. Whey they wait for a delayed bus, for example, they get restless after ten minutes or so. Is there a difference between “a delayed bus” and “a bus that is delayed(late)”? Also, is present...Read More...
I find sentence 1) OK. Sentence 2) seems off. Sentence 2) means that someone had deleted the mess inside of Ken’s computer. This, of course, is true, but I don’t think this is the intended meaning. The sentence would be better as 3): 3) Mary found a message in Ken’s computer that had been deleted. Still, of the sentences, the first seems best. However, ‘a deleted message’ seems a bit strange. We all have deleted messages in our computers, many, many deleted messages. Here we would probably...Read More...

got in/on the bus

When the bus arrived, the door opened and the passengers got in from the front, while the other passengers got down from the rear of the bus. 1. Are 'got in' and 'got down' correctly used? I was taught that passengers got on or off the bus. 2. Is the comma after 'front' necessary? I have seen the comma inserted after the word, but I think it should not be there in sentences such as the above. Thanks in advance.Read More...
You are right again, Ms. Tan. Yes, we 'get on' a bus and 'get off' a bus. However, I do believe that occasionally we do use 'get in' and 'get down from' a bus. Perhaps with a tour group. And maybe in some parts of the world. Then, there would usually not be a comma between 'front' and 'while.' I say 'usually' because if for some reason the writer wanted to indicate an unusually long pause here, s/he might use a comma.Read More...

Then, the snake charmer...

Then, the snake charmer blows his flute and taps the basket with his left thigh. I have seen a comma used after 'Then' very often. However, I wonder whether it is necessary. Thanks in advance.Read More...
You are observant, Ms. Tan. Very often there is no comma after then. Use a comma only if you want to indicate a pause.Read More...

correct prepositions

This pair of diamonds by jewellers DeGems is/are the twin stars of/at the International Jewellery Show 2010 that opened last Thursday. Which words in bold should I use? Are there any errors in the sentence? Thanks in advance.Read More...
This pair of diamonds by jewellers DeGems is/arethe twin stars of/at the International Jewellery Show 2010 that opened last Thursday. Usually, ‘the pair’ is followed by a singular verb: a pair of birds is living in our tree, a pair of socks was lost in the laundry, a pair of wet shoes is on the floor . But there is an exception. When the subject complement is plural, as it is here – twin stars – it’s best to use the plural verb, ‘are.’ That’s because it sounds bad to say, ‘…. is twin stars.’...Read More...

sentence structure

Can I say, (a) Lee in the toilet washed her shoes by herself. (b) She in the kitchen helps mother wash the rice.Read More...
Mehrdad has correct this sentence perfectly, Vincent. But there is more. This sentence, because of the combination of 'wash' and 'toilet,' makes it look like Lee washed her shoes in the water that is in the toilet. Is that what you mean, Vincent? Here in the US, while we do often refer to 'toilet' as the place/room where one does delicate things, in this case, because of the verb 'wash' and the fact that there is water in the toilet, the sentence is not good. Say that Lee washed her things...Read More...

If I am or if I were

Hi teachers, A 67-year-old man who is known as one of the most successful investors of our time, during an interview with a newspaper, said, “Seriously, I’m spending much less time doing anything else. This could be partly because I came into parenthood much later in life. I simply do not want to miss out being a father. Maybe if I am 20 years old (when it is a mistake to have children), I might have some 70 years ahead of me. But there is not much time to do anything else but to make sure...Read More...
It's true that the sentence would logically have the phrase 'if I were.' In this case, using 'if I am' is a matter of style. The speaker is using a kind of present tense narrative, and in this case, he is describing a scene in which it would be possible for him to actually be 20 years old. It's like saying, 'Imagine that I am 20 years old.' The style is the man's personal style, and would not be appropriate for anything other than a quotation.Read More...

best novel ever written, by...

Can one say: a. The best novel ever written, by Cervantes, is Don Quixote. instead of: b. The best novel ever written, which was by Cervantes, is Don Quixote.Read More...
I agree with Mehrdad's rewording. The word order in sentence a is likely to confuse people.Read More...

Rescue workers didn't know that anyone was there.

Could you help us with this: (1) Rescue workers didn't know that anyone was there. What does (1) mean? Is it (2)? (2) Rescue workers were sure that no one was there. Thank you in advance Seiichi MYOGARead More...
I don't think the context allows the interpretation 'thought no one was there'. Why else would they bring in a trained dog to search for someone? Obviously the searchers believed that there might be someone somewhere (including 'there'). The searchers thought there might be (or even probably was) someone somewhere, but they did not know where exactly. That's why they brought in the search dog.Read More...

Since 2005

Are these two sentences right? if so, do they have different meaning? 1. I have lived in this town since 2005 2. I lived in this town since 2005Read More...
Sentence 1 could be a response to either of these questions, for example: - Since when have you lived in this town? - How long have you lived in this town? (Use the first one if you want to be absolutely sure that you get 'since 2005' in the response. Sentence 2 is more likely to result in a response that uses 'for 5 years' rather than 'since 2005'.)Read More...
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