Questions and Answers

three times

a. Three times he had books stolen from him. b. He had books stolen from him on three occasions. Could those sentences be used if each time one book was stolen from him? ============================= c. He had a book stolen from him three times. Is that one correct? Could it be used if each time a different book was stolen from him. Many thanksRead More...
Hi, Azz, Both 'a' and 'b' don't tell the exact number of books stolen from him. If the addressee knows that exact number, he / she will understand the speaker's intended meaning. It is correct, but funny, as it means that a certain book was stolen from him more than once. It doesn't convey your intended meaning above. I think you can better use your words above: He had three books. Each time, one book was stolen from him.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Grammar correction from Microsoft Word

I just typed this sentence into Microsoft Word, "A total of four people were going", and it wants to correct the 'were' to 'was'. Why? 'Was' definitely sounds wrong when I say it out loud.Read More...
Hi, Kezi, and welcome to G.E, I see this question is highly problematic, so I'd like just to express my opinion about it. On 'LDOCE', we have two examples that summarize my opinion: 1. A total of thirteen meetings were held to discuss the issue. 2. A total of $950 million was spent on the new transportation system. I see 'a total of' works like 'collective nouns'. It could be followed by a singular or a plural verb depending on how the speaker sees the individuals of the group. I think that...Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

is it "he's never had them" correct?

hi, i saw a video on youtube, the boy had to express his emotion when he lose airport ( actually he does not use it) so the other said :"he's never had them". so i want to know what does that sentence mean. if my question has something wrong, pls forgive me :>Read More...

who do "oddballs" refer to?

Dear Contributors, The following article is from a test paper. I have troube understanding: who do "oddballs" refer to? Some say that "oddballs" refer to scientists like Sir Isaac Newton; others say that "oddballs" refer to the young scientists giving up imaginative thought. I would appreciate it if yoiu could give me an explanation.Read More...

phone

Hello, In olden times, when people said "the phone" it meant a traditional type of a home phone that couldn't be carried in your pocket . But today most people use smartphones, iPhones, mobile phones that can be carried anywhere. So, today, does the word "my phone" refer to any kind of handheld phone, no matter which kind you have? Can you say " I have lost my phone" regardless of which kind? AppleRead More...
Hello, Apple—Yes, that is correct. "My phone" can be used in reference to your phone no matter what type of phone you have, and "I have lost my phone" can likewise be used no matter what type of phone you have.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Do / play

Which is correct and sound natural? A: What sports do you do? B: (a) I like swimming and volleyball / playing volleyball. (b) I do karate and ice-skating (c) I play / like football and ice-skating / like ice-skating. (d) I do karate and swimming / I like karate and (go) swimming. (e) I do karate and football / play football / like football. Thanks.Read More...
Hi, Bear-Bear, I'm sure you know that team sports that are played with a ball take 'play' and activities ending with 'ing' take 'go', while violent and recreational activities take 'do'. However, when you ask the question 'what sports do you do?', you can use 'do' before all sports. See here: http://www.learnenglishlanguag...ports-play-do-or-go/ So, I see that 'a' and 'e' are perfect. 'B' and 'd' are acceptable answers (because of the form of the question that precedes them). 'C' is ...Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

will increase / will have increased

THE POPULATION OF THE WORLD WILL BE INCREASING/will increase/will have increased TO AROUND TEN BILLION BY THE YEAR 2100. I think the progressive form is wrong. What about the other two forms? I think they can work. Thanks!Read More...
I agree with Ahmed that "will have increased" is the best answer, and with you, Muh, that the progressive is wrong. While "will increase" is possible, it improperly conveys that the increase may be a sudden jump. What is needed is the idea that a process of increase will have reached a certain level by a certain date, and for that the future perfect is needed. Here is a simpler example for comparison: Your child will have grown to a height of at least 4 feet by the time he or she is a teenager.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

restrictive clause and -ing

Hi, here a question from a non-native: I see often in scientific articles sentences such as: Animals have approximately 20000 genes encoding proteins. That sound a little bit odd to me. Would it be more correct to use the restrictive clause? Animals have approximately 20000 genes that encode proteins.Read More...
Hello Gustavo, thanks for the fast reply!Read More...
Last Reply By jack001 · First Unread Post

Grammar verb agreement

In book 8 of the Pendragon series, Pilgrims of Rayne, there is a line that I have a question about. It is a statement made by one of the character's of the book, it occurs on page 397, in the top half of the page, and is as follows: "You're going to wish this were a trick," I said bluntly. I believe this is incorrect, however, I am not 100% sure. I believe it should be: "You're going to wish this was a trick," I said bluntly. I know "You are" is correct, however, shouldn't it be: "this was"?Read More...
Hello, SoulReaver09, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. Both were and was are correct. According to (mainly British) grammar purists, "were" is more correct than "was," which is considered more informal. This has to do with the subjunctive form of the verb be (in some grammar books, you may also find it under the name of unreal past , that is, a past form that does not convey past meaning): - I wish this were (was) a trick. - If only this were (was) a trick. - It's time the trick were...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

too/as well/also

Which are correct: 1) His eyes can't see and his ears can't hear either. 2) He was wearing an eye-patch, and his arm was in a cast too. 3 ) He was wearing an eye-patch, and his arm was in a cast as well. 4) He was wearing an eye-patch, and his arm was also in a cast. Gratefully, NaviRead More...

an army to fight/from here to infinitive!

Are these sentences correct: 1) My father contributed three sons to fight for the country. 2) My father contributed three sons to fight. 3) Our king gave your country an army to fight your enemies. 4) Our king gave your country an army to fight. 5) Our king contributed to your country an army to fight. Could '2' mean that the sons were supposed to fight for those they were contributed to? Could '4' mean that the army was supposed to fight FOR your country? I'd interpret '4' to mean that your...Read More...

could+noun+Verb VS noun+could+verb

May I know which of the statement below is grammatical ? (1) Explain how could a CEO explores them to plan and implement organizational strategies. (2) (1) Explain how a CEO could explore them to plan and implement organizational strategies.Read More...
Hi, Joshua—Both sentences are totally ungrammatical. You haven't used "explore"/"explores" grammatically in either sentence, and (1) suffers from the additional error, common among English language learners whose grammar is weak, that you have used inversion in an embedded question. You can't explore someone to do something . Maybe the word you're looking for is "implore." If you changed "explore" to "implore," then (2) would be correct: (2a) Explain how a CEO could implore them to plan and...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

is vs being

May I know which of the sentence below is appropriate? (1) In view of strategic evaluation is an important tool for assessing how well your business has performed. (2) In view of strategic evaluation being an important tool for assessing how well your business has performed.Read More...
Hi, Joshua—Neither (1) nor (2) is correct or appropriate: (1) is an absurd inversion of " An important tool for assessing how well your business has performed is in view of strategic evaluation ," which makes no sense at all, and (2) is not even a sentence (it's a fragment, an introductory phrase). You could use (2) as part of a larger sentence, however. The following would be correct: (2a) In view of strategic evaluation being an important tool for assessing how well your business has...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Colon, semicolon, comma, or something else?

Hi, what would be the correct way to punctuate this sentence after the word 'city'? I would usually opt for a comma in this situation but it becomes confusing with the list and another comma directly after. Woven into the fabric of each city: laneways, hidden nooks and rooftops deliver undiscovered gems.Read More...

Apostrophe

Can this omitting of an apostrophe be justified? Would be interested to get your views. :-)Read More...
When to Form a Plural with an Apostrophe By Maeve Maddox This reader wants to know why we write 1980s and not 1980’s. A lot of writers share this reader’s understanding that non-letter characters are pluralized by adding apostrophe s. Alas. Alas, indeed. That pesky apostrophe raises a lot of blood pressure for writers of English. I can’t really answer the reader’s question. What I can do is lay out what the Chicago Manual of Style says about when to use an apostrophe and when not to. And it...Read More...
Last Reply By E D · First Unread Post

A meaning of a phrase

What does "few people would question the role that computers could play in eduacation"mean ? 1/many people are certain about the importance of computers 2/some people ask questions about computers 3/Not many people doubt the importance of computers The suggested answer is "3" but what about "1"?Read More...
Hi, Ahmed55—The fact that few would doubt does not mean many are certain.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

this time tomorrow

Hello. Could you please help me? What is the difference between the following sentences? - This time tomorrow, my mother will have had an operation. - This time tomorrow, my mother will have an operation. - This time tomorrow, my mother will be having an operation. Thank you so much.Read More...
Hi, Ahmed, It means that by this time, the operation with have been finished and my mother will be in her room, but not the operating room. It means that the doctors will start the operation at this time tomorrow. It is scheduled. At this time tomorrow, the doctors will be in the process of doing the operation to my mother. It is something arranged.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

third or mixed conditionals

Hello. Could you help me? The following sentence is third conditional. - If the wheel hadn't been invented, the world would have been very different now. However, some colleagues say that it's wrong and it must written "mixed conditionals like that: - If the wheel hadn't been invented, the world would be very different now. Which one is correct, please? Thank you.Read More...
Hi, Ahmed, I prefer to see it as a third conditional sentence, without 'now'. When you see the link below, you will see that the original source of this sentence doesn't include 'now' . https://books.google.com.eg/bo...very+different+now.+ However, I agree with your colleagues that inserting 'now' would mean that you are thinking about a present state 'counterfactual', and that would require 'would + inf.' For example: 1. A: How different the world would have been if the wheel hadn't been...Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Indirect speech

The boss asked me if I (would be - am - will be) willing to stay after the limited working hours. Which one is correct?Read More...
Hello, Emad—"Would be" is the only answer that works from a native standpoint in a normal context. However, this is not to say that "am" and "will be" are ungrammatical or that they are absolutely impossible in any conceivable context.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Expressions of time limits

Regarding the expressions of time limits or some quantities as an object of prepositions, is it possible to make a generalization such as below? "If the reference point is the point of arrival , include it. If the reference point is the starting point, do not include it (they constitute comparisons)" Under these rules, objects of “until” and “by” are arrival points, so the referenced points are to be included, but these of “before”, they are starting point and to be excluded. For example, by...Read More...

Restrictive vs nonrestrictive

Hello! The 2 people are talking about the Coronavirus: - Don't worry, young people will be fine. - The problem is the elder relative which we all have. Question: Is "which we all have" a restrictive relative clause? If it is not, is a comma needed before it?Read More...
Hi, Robby zhu, "which" is wrong there, and I'd use "elderly" rather than "elder." - The problem is the elderly relatives we all have. In this sentence, "we all have" is a restrictive clause.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Relative pronouns

1/Our new car...... we bought last month,seats five people(which/that) 2/He wants to tell you something.... is very important(which/that)Read More...
Hi, Ahmed, Are you sure there is no comma after 'car'? If there is, then the answer is 'which' . 'That' is the better answer because it is commonly used after quantifiers like 'something'.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

grammatical structure "as many as..."

Dear Sir: I am an English teacher. Another English teacher asked me about this grammar structure: Galatians 3:10, King James Version: "For as many as are of the works of the law are under the curse;...." She asked how to explain why there are 2 verbs ("are"). She wonders if there is a word missing. I said the part "as are of the works of the law" is modifying the subject "many," answering the question "how many?" Then the subject "many" goes with the predicate "are under the curse." She...Read More...
Thank you both for confirming my thoughts. When my friend asked this question, it made me think hard, and so I thought it was a really interesting question. I really do appreciate your taking time to answer and adding similar structures.Read More...
Last Reply By PamelaH · First Unread Post

using all lowercase for vitamin type for style

if you are writing in all lowercase for style, is it allowed that when referring to vitamin type the letter is still lowercase and not uppper? Example: vitamin c vs. vitamin CRead More...
Hi, Jambo12, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. I don't think so, because it's the name of the vitamin. You might want to read this blog .Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Noun clause and adverb clause

Ali Reza
Hello. There is one thing about adverb clause and noun clause that blows my mind. We can use "wheter or not" and "if" in both clauses, so what is the diffirence between these two? Best regards! AliRead More...
Yes, the idea is correct. Note, however, that your post above is full of grammar and spelling mistakes, which you really should try to avoid.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Reference points included?

A statement such as "He paid me more than $ 200 last month" excludes the case that the person gave me $200 just. Is it safe to think that "above" and "below" do not include the reference points? On the other hand, in the phrases "between you and me", it includes the two people referred to, so I think "between $200 and $300" would also include the reference points. If so, what would be the difference between these two sets of prepositions? Thank you very much.Read More...
Gustavo, >the reference points will not be included if what is measured has a different nature, Informative and very interesting explanation. Thank you very much!Read More...
Last Reply By ken · First Unread Post

Relative pronouns

This is a story ......hero travels to space (in which/whose) The suggested answer is "whose" but I think both are correct 2/that's the stadium ... we saw the cup final at(which/where)Read More...
Hi, Ahmed, The suggested answer is the only correct answer here. To use another relative pronoun, you must insert a definite or an indefinite article before 'hero'. Only 'which' works here.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Possesion

Which affirmation is correct and why? ( I think the first one is correct but I don't know to explain why) 1.You changed your hair color. 2.You changed your hair's color.Read More...
Hello, Crys, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. Both sentences are grammatically correct, but (1) sounds more natural than (2). One reason for this may be the prevalence of such related compound nouns as hairspray, hair products, haircut, hair length , etc. Another reason may be that hairs, hairs' , and hair's all sound exactly alike, and the speaker means to speak of the interlocutor's hair as a whole. Hair is a count and a noncount noun. It is more normal to say "You changed the color of...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Need help.

Hi, I bought an apartment near my son's school. Now I'm living with my parents and will move there soon. It is not furnished, so I'll have to get all the furniture. I don't have much money to buy furniture. So I am planning to buy only the necessary items. I heard about this furniture store in Edmonton , they sell furniture at a low price. Has anyone tried them? Please give me feedback if you have. Is this Grammarly correct? I want to text to one of the dealers there, so please solve any...Read More...
Okay, Thanks.Read More...
Last Reply By felixsaniya · First Unread Post

more crimes

1) He committed a lot of crimes in New York. Later, he committed more crimes in Austin. 2) He committed a lot of crimes in New York. Later, he committed a lot more crimes in Austin. Aren't these sentences ambiguous? Two possible interpretations: a) He committed a greater ('much greater' in the case of '2') number of crimes in Austin than he had committed in New York. b) He committed additional crimes in Austin, but it is not clear whether the number of the crimes in Austin is higher than the...Read More...

The word (species)

The species mentioned in the passage are....(plants and animals/animals/plants)Read More...
Do you view this as a grammar question, Ahmed55? The word "species" seems to me to be unspecified in the passage. I believe the author is speaking of percentages of all species (plants, animals, insects, etc.).Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post
×
×
×
×