Questions and Answers

smell the bread bake

I can smell the bread _______ . a. bake b. baked c. baking Are they all correct? What are the differences? Thanks!Read More...

too vs so

Which is more suitable? 1. Children can be SO naughty sometimes. 2. Children can be TOO naughty sometimes.Read More...

Singular or plural

Could you please help me answer this? Choose: She is one of the few women who ......climbed Everest. A. has B. have C. BothRead More...
Hi, Sedo and Ahmed, I agree with your answer, Ahmed. Both the singular and the plural form are commonly used in that construction by native speakers. The strict correctness of using the plural, however, becomes obvious when one rearranges the sentence: (B1) She is one of the few women who have climbed Mount Everest . (B2) Of the few women who have climbed Mount Everest , she is one. (B3) * Of the few women who has climbed Mount Everest , she is one .Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

will have to

you .............get up early tomorrow if you want to catch the bus. (have to/will have to/don't have to/don't) the answer in the book (don't have to) why can't I choose (will have to)Read More...
Hi, poet, May I ask about the name of this book? There are two possible answers here. Both 'have to' and 'will have to' are correct answers.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Leave or omit object?

cocoricot
Dear teachers, 1. "The coffee is too hot for me to drink the coffee." I know that I can omit the second "the coffee" because it is redundant. There is no need to repeat it because it is clear that everyone knows it. -> The coffee is too hot for me to drink. 2. "Peter is too young to take care of himself." Is it a similar case? Does it mean that 'himself' can also be omitted? Please explain to me. Thanks.Read More...
Hello, Coco, You've asked a very interesting question. I agree with DocV's answer and would like to add that everything relates here to subject and object within infinitive clauses. You might not be accustomed to thinking of infinitive constructions as clauses, but they are: they have a subject and a predicate. But the verb in infintiive clauses lacks tense. That's why they are referred to as nonfinite clauses. (1a) The coffee is too hot for me to drink. (1b) The coffee is too hot to drink.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

won't have to or don't have to

you ..... ..........come if you don't want to. (won't have to or don't have to)Read More...
Hello, Poet20, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! This appears to be an exercise from a workbook or perhaps an item from a test. It is OK for members to ask questions about such items, but we encourage members to do more than simply present the exercise. Try to say why you feel uncertain of the answer, or tell us which answer you think is right. The answer to your exercise is "don't have to": " You don't have to come if you don't want to ." The other answer, "won't have to," is not...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

So or such

Help me with this question taken from our school book. It's ........... hot outside that I can't go shopping. a) enough b) too c) such d) so I think the answer is (d). But one of my colleagues told me the answer was (c) because" it Is " or " it was " should be followed by " Such ". Please, let me know which is right. Thanks.Read More...
Yes, the correct answer here is: d) so Thank you Doc V for answering this question in particular and clarifying the fabrication of this rule. Regrettably, it isn't one of Yama's colleagues who mentioned that fabricated information above. That information is mentioned in one of our outside books which thousands of pupils and hundreds of teachers trust. The puzzle is that the sentence above is written correctly in our student book page 32. It says: It is so hot outside …. . I wonder from which...Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Are both or both are

Which sentence of these two is more correct? 1- There are two restaurants by the park and they are both very good. 2- There are two restaurants by the park and they both are very good. Let me know which one is right. If they both are correct, let me know if there is a difference in meaning. As usual, I really appreciate it. Thanks in advance.Read More...
They are both grammatically correct. Personally, I prefer: 3: There are two very good restaurants by the park. Note that in (2), "they" can be omitted: 2a: There are two restaurants by the park and both are very good. You can't do that with (1). DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Both or each

grandmother says that my brothers and I can ........... take a cake from the kitchen. 1- each 2- every 3- both 4- either I guess the suitable answer is (1). But, I'm not sure. If I'm right, I don't know why (3) isn't suitable. Thanks in advance.Read More...
DocV, I'm honored to share you the same opinion.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Wish

Hi there, Just want to double check something here. Q. Write a sentence with 'wish'. I don't get enough exercise. I wish I could lead a healthier lifestyle. But, is 'I wish I lead a healthier lifestyle' possible? Could is better in this case because there is a possibility of it being true? What are your thoughts?Read More...
I agree with what Gustavo says, and I'd like to add a few thoughts of my own. 1a: I wish I could lead a healthier lifestyle. 1b: I wish I led a healthier lifestyle. As Gustavo says, (1a) is used by someone who wants to lead a healthier lifestyle, but can't; something is preventing him. The same person could say (1b) instead, but there are a number of other circumstances where (1b) might be used. For example, he may have just noticed how bad his habits are, and feels ashamed. Kes, you wrote:...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Use "they" when you don't know the gender.

1 If I don't know the gender, I should use "they", not "that person or this person" in the present. Ex: a I should say "If you meet someone today, they'd better be a doctor." not "If you meet someone today, that person / this person had better be a doctor.". b I should say "I'm looking for someone reasonable from the FBI to mediate my situation, and I'd be very grateful if I could find them (not that person / this person)." c I should say "When you pray for someone—how does your prayer...Read More...

figure out how to complain

a. He has yet to come across a book he can't figure out how to complain about. b. He has yet to come across a problem he can't find someone to solve. c. He has never met a man he didn't know how to find fault with. d. He has never met someone he couldn't find a way to deal with. Are the above sentences grammatical? I know one can end sentences with prepositions. That is not a problem for me. Many thanks.Read More...
Hi, Azz, What an interesting batch of sentences. They are all certifiably bad, but none of them is certifiably ungrammatical. In the linguistic literature, they would receive question marks, not ungrammaticality asterisks. Each of your sentences contains a syntactic island violation. In (a) and (c), you are trying to relativize an element contained in embedded questions; in (b) and (d), you are trying to relativize an element that itself comes from a relative clause. Relative clauses and...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

It Is/Was The Hardest Thing I Have..

Hi there, Should I use is or was with present perfect tense "I have ever done" in the following context? Here's the context: A year ago, I climbed to the top of a hill after trying for three hours. Oh my God, that is/was the hardest thing I have ever done.Read More...
I agree with Hussein. An exception can be made if you have just finished climbing the hill, in which case it is possible to say That was the hardest thing I have ever done. But it is never wrong to use "is" in that sentence. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Help with grammatical terminology please

Can a grammar bod help me to explain what is missing in this sentence. I need the proper grammatical terminology! " Approximately 15% chance of failure if a person had one previously, or 25% if a person has had two." Obviously this sentence is a fragment, it needs something added like "There is an approximately 15%..." to make is a proper sentence (or rewriting). But what's the grammatical term for what's missing? Is it that the sentence doesn't have a subject? (Is "There is" a subject?) Or...Read More...
Hey Gustavo - this is super helpful, thanks! "grammatical subject" that's what I was after.Read More...
Last Reply By Toom · First Unread Post

fundamentally wrong and primarily wrong

Hi! I came across this IELTS grammar exercise (on this website: https://www.examenglish.com/IELTS/ielts_grammar_test2.htm ): The conclusions of the climate deniers _______ wrong. a) up to a point b) fundamentally c) primarily According to the website, the correct answer is "b) fundamentally". I don't understand why answer "c) primarily" is incorrect. I researched "primarily wrong" in Google's search box and several hits came up with this combination. I know that this is not a guarantee that...Read More...
You're right. I forgot to include the word "are". Oops! Glad you caught that! Thanks for you quick response and clear explanation!Read More...
Last Reply By shantower · First Unread Post

Movies or THE movies?

Hi, She enjoys going to the movies / movies . In my mind, same meaning. Anyone care to chime in? Thanks.Read More...
Hi, Perriced, The expression with the verb "go" is "go to the movies " (meaning: go to the movie threater). "movies" with the zero article will be fine with other verbs, like: - She enjoys watching movies .Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

the free verse that is really verse...

1) Yvor Winters , the poet/critic said "the free verse that is really verse, the best that is, of W.C. Williams , H. D. , Marianne Moore , Wallace Stevens , and Ezra Pound is the antithesis of free" Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Free_verse#cite_ref-autogenerated1937_8-1 The Wikipedia article cites as the source of the quoted passage this book: Primitivism and Decadence: A Study of American Experimental Poetry Arrow Editions, New York, 1937 I think '1' is unambiguously saying that the...Read More...
Hi, Navi, I think there is a couple of commas missing in (1), one to close the two appositions "the poet/critic" and "the best, that is, of ... and Ezra Pound," and another to precede the reformulatory "that is." 1') Yvor Winters , the poet/critic , said "the free verse that is really verse, the best , that is, of W.C. Williams , H. D. , Marianne Moore , Wallace Stevens , and Ezra Pound , is the antithesis of free." I find "that is for instance" redundant in (2). At least, I'd separate them,...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Enough, so, too or such

The exam was.............. difficult for me. 1- enough 2- so 3- too 4- such Help me answer this question. Thanks in advance.Read More...
Hi, Yama, I suspect your book, or your teacher, expects you to use "too." However, "so" would also be possible. "too" is more negative, the result being that the speaker did not pass the exam. "so" would be a colloquial way of saying "very" or "rather."Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Too or so

I'm........... hungry. When will dinner be ready? 1- such a lot 2- too 3- so 4- enough I think, the answer must be 2 or 3. I have no idea which one is better. Please, let me know what you think. If possible, let me know why you chose your answer. Thanks a lot.Read More...
In keeping with the same line of thought I followed here , I'd use (3) so , Yama. I'd reserve too for a context in which some negative consequence is implied, for example: - I'm too hungry to wait two hours for dinner. I'll have a sandwich.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

So - very - too - enough

Carol had a bad experience in that shop. They were ........ rude to her for no reason. 1- so 2- very 3- too 4- enough Let me know what is the best answer. If possible, tell me why you chose it. Thanks.Read More...
Is there any other difference between " So " and " very " other than the one mentioned above in the quotation? I'm asking because the difference you mentioned won't help me much in answering other questions which aren't related to emtions. As always, thanks for your much appreciated help.Read More...
Last Reply By Yama · First Unread Post

Enough, so much, or a lot

This didn't cost ............. to go to the trouble of getting a refund. 1- such 2- enough 3- so much 4- a lot Can you tell what the best choice is? I think it's ( enough) because of the "to + infinitive" following the empty space. Thanks in advance.Read More...
Ok, Yama. No problem. I thought you were complaining. The way you expressed yourself was fine. I only misinterpreted you.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Such or such a

It was ............. delicious cake that we ate it all. 1- so 2- such 3- such a 4- enough It's either 2 or 3. I don't know if " cake " is countable or uncountable in this sentence. I think, it's uncountable. Let me know what you think. Thanks in advance.Read More...
Hi, Yama, "cake" is usually countable, and this sentence is no exception. The correct choice is (3): - It was such a delicious cake that we ate it all. We can also say: - The cake was so delicious that we ate it all. "cake" will be uncountable when used alone or with a partitive like "some" or "a piece of."Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

used to

Hi. I knew that we don't use "used to" to say how many times an action happened as in " I used to go to France three times last year." *My question: Is this sentence Ok ~ "I used to go on holiday once a year." ? Or should we apply the previous rule? * This is from "Practical English Usage" ~Read More...
Ayman, Mr Swan (author of Practical English Usage ) does say that "used to" cannot be used to speak of how many times an action happened, but he doesn't say that it cannot be used to address how frequently it happened. There is nothing wrong with this sentence: I used to go on holiday once a year. For more information, please see this thread: Used to & Would DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Noun Phrase

Hey there, I have some question about noun phrases in the examples: 1. There is so much about languages I would like to understand. --> Is 'so much about languages I would like to understand' a noun phrase? 2. Jack has played the guitar for more than five months. --> Is 'more than five months' a noun phrase (as part of a prepositional phrase?) And if yes, is 'more' or 'months' the head of the noun phrase? 3. With my sister playing the piano all the time, it's hard to focus on my...Read More...
Of course you don't. Answering questions to the best of our knowledge is our mission here (actually, nobody forces us to do so), so we are always happy to be of help. Just like "not only/but also" in your example (6) further above, "both/and" are correlative conjunctions, and this makes the whole structure a single (though compound) NP. "both" will be a determiner only when modifying a plural noun and meaning "the two of them": Both students are good. "with flowers and green spaces" is a...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

Either or all

We have seen different suitcases and............... of them will fit inside the aeroplane. Just choose one! 1..both 2.. Either 3.. neither 4.. All Can you help me choose the correct answer? I guess 4 is ok. But, I'm not sure, because of the word "one" at the end of the sentence. Please let me know what you think. Thanks a lot.Read More...
Thanks for your help. I'm truly sorry for any unintended mistakes. I'll do my best to avoid these mistakes again. Thanks again.Read More...
Last Reply By Yama · First Unread Post

Phrasal verbs

Hussein Hassan
Hello, our teachers. I need your help. With regard to the phrasal verbs, the rule says: "If the object is a pronoun (such as it, him, her, them), then the object always comes between the verb and the adverb. https://en.oxforddictionaries....rammar/phrasal-verbs - He received a job offer, but he turned it down . That's what I've explained to my students. The following sentence is excerpted from the book I teach ( Aim high 6 ): "When it comes to traits like the colour of your eyes or your...Read More...
Last Reply By ceedhanna · First Unread Post

Find

Hello, Freelance workers find doing their accounts ( difficult - is difficult - are difficult - being difficult - a difficulty ) for them to do on their own. Thanks in advance.Read More...
Menem, Please remember that one of the few absolute rules we have on this forum is that, when quoting from a published source, you must cite the source. This includes paraphrases. And, if the source material is available online, you are to provide a link. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Referring about organic cookies/conventional cookies

"Researchers at the University of Michigan found that people believed that Oreo cookies that were labeled organic contained fewer calories than conventional Oreos, even though they had been shown the packaging listing the full nutritional and calorie content of both types of cookie and the calories were the same. The participants also thought that it was appropriate to eat organic Oreos more often than regular Oreos, and that it was more permissible for someone who was trying to lose weight...Read More...
Barry, No, "organic cookies" and "conventional cookies" do not mean literally "organic Oreos" and "conventional Oreos". Dr Herz begins by talking about a study that examined participants' perceptions of organic Oreos, specifically, as opposed to conventional Oreos. About halfway through the passage, she appears to extrapolate, applying the perceptions of the participants to organic and conventional cookies in general, not just Oreos. To say that "organic cookies" means literally "organic...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

for nothing

1) She won't do it for anything. 2) She will do it for nothing. Which can mean: a) There's nothing that can make her do it and can which mean: b) She'll do it for free and can which mean: c) She'll do it, but for no particular reason or for any gain I doubt that '1' could be used for 'b'. But can't it be used for 'c'? Consider: A) She won't do it for anything (in particular). It'll just be an irrational impulsive act. But she'll do it. And can't '2' have all three meanings? Consider: B)...Read More...
Navi, (1) means (a). (2) means (b), and (b) sounds better. (c) is a strange thing to say. This sounds better: c': She'll do it, but not for any particular reason. Regarding (A): How is the speaker able to predict another person's future impulsive act? If the act is to be impulsive, the person herself doesn't yet know that she'll be doing it. Is the speaker clairvoyant? These two sentences mean the same thing: B: She'll stop for nothing. B': She won't stop for anything. But these two do not:...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Crazy difference.

Hi , I was curious for the grammar of a sentence. Would it be "Anyone who plays Sion or Zoe deserve waterboarded" or "Anyone who plays Sion or Zoe deserve deserve waterboarding". Thanks!Read More...
Thanks a lot, Doc! I was talking to a friend who was telling me that "waterboarded" was in the past tense whereas "deserve" was 'doing something in the future". Didn't make much sense to me so I figured I'd make an account here and ask . Oof, yeah I don't know how that second "deserve" got in there! I did tell him afterward "deserves to be" in that sentence, but for the sake of accuracy I used how I originally said it. Yeah, Sion and, Zoe are characters from a video game that aren't fun to...Read More...
Last Reply By ayeiohpsy · First Unread Post

Each or both

Oh, no! I've got blisters on ........... of my feet now. I should never have worn these shoes. 1- all 2- two 3- each 4- both I think the last choice is correct. Let me know if I'm right. If possible, let me know why " each " isn't suitable. Thanks.Read More...
Yama, I agree that (4) is the best choice. (3) isn't incorrect, but it doesn't sound as natural as (4). DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Both either neither every

Would you rather have fish or meat? I like ................ but I usually have chicken. 1- both 2- neither 3- either 4- every Thanks.Read More...
Yama, "Either" tends to convey the sense of "one or the other". Here, the person answering is saying that he likes the two choices presented, not just one. Alternatively, he could have answered: 3': I'll eat either, but I'd rather have chicken. Here, "either" works because he is going to eat only one or the other of the two choices, not both. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

All or half

The film was very boring and ............ of the people left before the end. 1- all 2- whole 3- half 4- both I don't know which is correct 1 or 4. Can you please help? If possible , let me know why. Thanks in advance.Read More...
Thanks.Read More...
Last Reply By Yama · First Unread Post

"A" vs "The"

Hi there, What is the difference between A and The in the following sentences? No other animal is as tall as a/the giraffe. A/The Inland Taipan's venom is the most venomous one in the world. My grammar book says when we want to talk about a race or a whole class we use the. But still I am unable to decide a or the which one I should use. Can any please explain the meaning of each of the sentences using a and the. And which one do you think is more appropriate?Read More...
David, [Our] juice is the juiciest juice there is. I'm actually surprised that I haven't seen this used as an advertising slogan. For what it's worth, a Boeing 747 is 185 feet long with a cabin width of 20 feet. The biggest blue whale whose size was verified was only 98 feet long. I couldn't find any statistics about the width. DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

I like to know vs. I'd like to know

1) I like to know if the rumor is true or not. 2) I'd like to know if the rumor is true or not. I know the (2) sounds better. Is the sentence (1) wrong in terms of grammar?Read More...
Y2K, (2) is perfectly fine. It refers to one specific rumor. (1) expresses a generality. In a contextual vacuum, it requires the indefinite article: 1a: I like to know if a rumor is true or not. or better still: 1b: I like to know whether a rumor is true or not. Given proper context, though, it is possible to say (1) as it is: 1c: I'm aware that some managers in the past have asked for employees' resignations based on hearsay. I personally require more proof in such circumstances. I like to...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

pronunciaton of "rugged" as two-syllables, not consisten

I want to explain to my ESL student why we pronounce "rugged" as two syllables as an adjective, while we don't do the same with other one-syllable words ending in "--gged," such as tagged, plugged. I think if we were to use "rugged" as a verb, it would only be one syllable, "the room was beautifully rugged" (something we'd probably never say). The meaning of "rugged" changes with one syllable or two. Any ideas?Read More...
These are very good points, Gustavo. I should have said "than most verb forms ending in '-ed' do". We also have the word "striped", which is pronounced as one syllable when used as the past tense or participle of "to stripe", but can be one or two syllables when used as an adjective (unlike "learned", which is always two syllables when used as an adjective). DocVRead More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Either or each

Help me with this sentence. We looked at two hotels on the internet and ................. of them would be great for a holiday. 1- every 2- either 3- all 4- each I think (b) is the suitable choice. But, I'm not sure. I also cant tell why (d) isn't suitable. Thanks in advance.Read More...
Thanks for your help.Read More...
Last Reply By Yama · First Unread Post

Question tag (No.2)

Hi, My mother believes everyone should learn English, .....? 1) shouldn't they 2) doesn't she? Which one is correct? (Source: My student's question)Read More...
David, You say: The sentence "My mother believes everyone should learn English" can be followed with "Shouldn't they?," but only if the question is a separate sentence. This is an excellent point, and I'm glad you brought it up. You continue: In (3), "Shouldn't they?" is elliptical for "Shouldn't they (i.e. everyone) learn English?" The question asks whether the belief of the speaker's mother is true. I agree. I would add that the question asks whether the belief of the speaker's mother is...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post

Habitual actions

Hussein Hassan
Hello, our teachers, How can I explain the difference between using "will" & "simple present" to talk about habitual actions and behaviour? In other words, what's the difference between (a) & (b)? a) He usually goes to work by bicycle. b) He'll usually go to work by bicycle. Thanks in advance.Read More...
I fully agree, David. You are definitely right that "often" sounds much better to express a persistent present habit.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Contributor · First Unread Post

English grammer

What is the answeres?Read More...
Hi, Shouq, You seem not to understand how to use this site properly. The Grammar Exchange is for discussing questions about English grammar. It is not a site where people will help you cheat on your grammar homework, nor a site for soliciting members' personal contact information. If you do not know how to answer a grammar question from one of your homework assignments, try to understand what it is about the question that is causing you difficulty. This will give you an idea as to the...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

class

At ten o'clock we were all in our classes: fifty-four of us; only fifteen or sixteen of my companions of the second class, among them. ( from HEART by Edmondo De Amicis) What does "classes" mean in the second line? If it means a particular group of students, why is it not singular? If not, then what does it mean? Thanks! :)Read More...
You were not misleading, Doc. I misunderstood your meaning. Now I got it. Thank you, Doc and David!Read More...
Last Reply By ruifeng · First Unread Post

wasn't that good

a. The first song was excellent, but the second one wasn't so good. b. The first song was excellent, but the second one wasn't quite so good. c. The first song was excellent, but the second one wasn't that good. Aren't these sentences ambiguous? Was the second song not as good as the first one, or was it just not good? I'd take them to mean that the second one was just not a good song , but my feeling is that the other meaning is also possible. It seems to me that 'It wasn't so/that good'...Read More...
Wow! Thank you sooo much! I didn't expect such a detailed reply! You are correct in that in the real world the distinction between the two 'meanings' is not that great and could be negligible. But actually I believe that in (a) and (c) there's a grammatical difference... or maybe it is a semantic difference.. I'm not sure what to call it... Maybe the difference doesn't really change things since the same goal can be attained by two different methods. There are two different ways of...Read More...
Last Reply By azz · First Unread Post

one of whose pages

a. There isn't a book here of which I can't recite at least two pages by heart. b. There isn't a book here at least two of whose pages I can't recite by heart. c. There isn't a book here whose pages I can't recite at least two of by heart. Which of the above sentences are grammatically correct? They are a bit cumbersome, but are they grammatically acceptable? Many thanks.Read More...
Hello, Azz and Gustavo, These are interesting specimens. I share Gustavo's judgement that (a) the best sentence of the three, and I too find (b) and (c) to be worse and much worse, respectively, though I can't say that I find either of them ungrammatical. The stranding of "of" works much better, I think, if "which" or "that" is used: d1. There isn't a book here which I can't recite at least two pages of by heart. d2. There isn't a book here that I can't recite at least two pages of by heart.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

All, either, neither, both, every and each

Please help me know the difference between these words by answering these questions and telling me why the wrong choices aren't suitable. 1) I don't like ............. of the shirts. 1- neither 2- either 3- all 4- every 2) We looked at two hotels on the internet and ............ of them would be great for a holiday. 1- every 2- either 3- all 4- each 3) My sister bought two new skirts and ........... of them are long and green. 1- all 2- either 3- neither 4- both 4) The film was very boring...Read More...
Yama, Wow! Eight multiple choice questions. It sounds like you want us to do your whole lesson for you. I'm here to help, and I want to help, but I really think that the best thing here is for you to at least attempt an answer to each question, and explain why you chose it. Then one of us can go through and, essentially "grade" your answers. If you get any wrong, or if you choose a right answer but for the wrong reasons, we can then help you understand what was wrong with your thinking. And...Read More...
Last Reply By Doc V · First Unread Post
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