Questions and Answers

sequence of tenses

husseinhassan
Good morning, our teacherS, From The General Secondary Education Certificate Examination of Egypt, 2018: 1. I worked hard all day round, but I had failed to ___________ my goals. ( find / follow / score / achieve ) Sure, "achieve" is the correct choice, but I wonder whether the sentence is MEANINGFULLY correct or not. Note the tenses sequence, i.e. Wh ich action logically should happen first? Shouldn't it be: 2. I HAD WORKED hard all day round, but I FAILED to achieve my goals. Or 3. I HAD...Read More...
Hi, Hussein: The normal, native expression is not "all day round"; it's " the whole day round." If you search for that phrase, you will reap a nice harvest of results. I agree with Gustavo's answer. I'd also like to mention that it is perfectly fine to use the past simple in both clauses, to omit the repeated subject from the second clause, and to use "all day." You do not have to use "all the day" instead of "all day" if the period of time is completed. "All day" is correct in both cases.Read More...
Last Reply By davidmoderator · First Unread Post

When it rains, it pours vs It never rains, but it pours

"When it rains, it pours".Have you ever heard that idiom before? I would like to know does it same in meaning with "It never rains but it pours". Thanks.Read More...
Hi, bearbear, Yes. Both of them mean misfortunes seldom come singly. I also agree with the writer 'Joe Devney' that using 'but' in 'It never rains but it pours' is a bit unusual. See his opinion here: https://www.quora.com/What-doe...ns-but-it-pours-mean BTW, you should say: I would like to know if it has the same meaning as: .........Read More...
Last Reply By ahmedbtm · First Unread Post

participle subject advice needed

Hi And thanks for reading this post. I am trying to find the reason for errors in writing. Being a guy, *it is hard for him to understand her point of view. Having heard this before, *her patience was wearing thin. Being very rational, *speaking frankly was a very important to him. Wounding like an arrow, *he sometimes hated to hear the truth. Mentioned as constructive criticism,*there were no hard feelings. The explanation is: When a participle clause is placed before a clause, the...Read More...
Thanks. Brilliant reply. I just need one last thing clearing up. Can you please tell me, i read something online which puzzled me " Phrases that describe should be placed close to what they describe." Can you expand on this, is there a manner in which descrpitive phrases should be laid out. Many thanks.Read More...
Last Reply By john121 · First Unread Post

Verb form after "rather than"

Sometimes I see to infinitive and V-ing used after rather than. Can you please explain the correct use to me?Read More...
Hi, Thienan, and welcome to the G.E's new platform, 'Rather than' can be used either as a conjunction or a preposition. It can be followed by 'a bare infinitive' or 'ing' . Rachel, our great late moderator, gives more detailed information about 'rather than' as a conjunction (or a "quasi-coordinator' according to Quirk) and as a preposition on the following link: https://thegrammarexchange.inf...-than-and-instead-of On 'A Practical English Grammar' (4th ed):Read More...
Last Reply By ahmedbtm · First Unread Post

soon

Which position is correct? Are they same in meaning in any positions? 1 (a) It was soon time for lunch. (b) It was time for lunch soon. (c) It was time soon for lunch. 2 (a) Father lay down and dozed off soon. (b) Father lay down and soon dozed off.Read More...
Hi, bear_bear, 1(c) is the only one that is wrong, because there "soon" interferes between "time" and "for lunch": the phrase is "time for lunch," and it cannot be split. The difference between 1(a) and 1(b), as well as between 2(a) and 2(b), is subtle. I prefer 1(a) and 2(b) because the end position gives too much importance to an adverb of time that does not contribute much meaning. When the adverbial provides more information, then the final position may be justified: 1(d) It was time for...Read More...
Last Reply By gustavocontributor · First Unread Post

Formal or informal English

Hi, I have this question concerning teaching English (grammar): Should we teach formal English only or we should teach the informal form too?Read More...
Hi, Ayman and happy Eid al-Fitr, As for me, as a non-native speaker, I always teach students what they have in their books. In fact, that has been Okaasan's advice to me. So, when our books mention something informal, I refer to it and connect my explanation with the exam. For example, our books say: I wish there was/were something I was interested in. I tell my students that both 'was' and 'were' after 'wish' here are correct, but 'were' is preferable . If they have to choose between them...Read More...
Last Reply By ahmedbtm · First Unread Post

like a wild animal

Are these sentences correct: 1) They threw him in a cage like a wild animal. 2) They threw him in a cage, like a wild animal. 3) He threw me a bone like a dog. 4) He threw me a bone, like a dog. Does the comma change anything? Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Hello again, Navi: To me, that can't mean that she talked to you as if you were a child. That is not a possible meaning. What (5) means is that she was like a child when she talked to you; that is, she talked to you in a childish manner. In informal dialectal English, you might very well hear " She talked to me like I was a child ," and that, of course, would have the "as if I were a child" meaning. As you know, one alternative to using "as if I were a child" or "like I was a child" is to...Read More...
Last Reply By davidmoderator · First Unread Post

grammar issue

hi is this sentence grammatically wrong or just uncommon : he screamed while being shot at.Read More...
Hello, Sadra, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! The sentence "He screamed while being shot at" is neither wrong nor uncommon. The sentence is grammatically correct, and the grammatical structures it contains are common. What is it about the sentence that perplexes you or causes you to worry that it might be wrong? Are you familiar with reduced adverbial clauses, the progressive passive, and the prepositional passive? The sentence means the same thing as "He screamed while he was being...Read More...
Last Reply By davidmoderator · First Unread Post

Usage and omission of "the"

Hi there, can anyone please tell me if I can omit the in the following sentence? Is the in the following sentence optional? (The) villagers in this village are very rich because they use modern technology for cultivation. And one more question, I was watching a cricket match and I heard a commentator (a native speaker) saying "The match is in an interesting stage. Indian fans are shouting for Virat Kohli and his team." Don't you think it should be " the Indian fans are shouting for Virat...Read More...
Hello, Subhajit123, I find that "the" is required because we are speaking about specific villagers, those living in "this village." That noun phrase is comparable to " the inhabitants of this village." Strictly speaking, "the" is necessary as it refers to the Indian fans watching the match, but I think it can be acceptably omitted in speech. Please note that in your explanation you are mixing up the people who are chanting with the police trying to stop them. I find the first omission of the...Read More...
Last Reply By gustavocontributor · First Unread Post

sunbathed or was sunbathing

ceedhanna
When I was In Hurghada, I ...........a lot. sunbathed was sunbathingRead More...
Swan has contradicted himself with his own example, unfortunately. The assertion that "[t]he past continuous is used to express repeated or habitual actions in the past that were temporary" is correct, and Gustavo is correct in affirming its truth. Swan's example ( At the time when it happened, I was travelling to New York a lot ) actually serves to illustrate the truth of that generalization. "A lot" in the phrase "was travelling to New York a lot " expresses that there were numerous and...Read More...
Last Reply By davidmoderator · First Unread Post

Unusual Plural

My school uses an alligator as a mascot. His name is Navi (pronounced Nav-ee) the navigator. We frequently use his name in the plural as we have various versions of his image. How should we make his name plural? Navis Navies Please...anything but an unconventional use of the apostrophe.Read More...
Hi, GrammarCrazed, Great to see you on the new platform, GrammarCrazed. It has been a long time since I last saw your great comments here. I'm very happy to see you here again. Hi, Heather W, I completely agree with GrammarCrazed. The plural of 'Navi' is 'Navis'. You can see the word 'Nazis' on LDOCE as the plural form of 'Nazi', which is close in its written form- and not in its meaning- to 'Navi'.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmedbtm · First Unread Post

ripen / ripe fruits

Which is correct? They saw a guava tree with many ripen / ripe fruits.Read More...
I agree with Ahmed_btm. Interestingly, "ripen" can be changed from a verb into an adjective (a participial adjective) by adding -ed: "ripened." Thus, we can speak of there being many ripe guavas on the guava tree, or of there being many ripened guavas on the guava tree. "Ripened" is commonly found in hyphenated constructions, like "sun-ripened tomatoes" and "tree-ripened guavas." In your sentence, bear_bear, "ripe" would be the usual choice, even though both words work. If the guavas on the...Read More...
Last Reply By davidmoderator · First Unread Post

boasted / boastful

Which is the word choice suited to the question below? 1 What was the miller boasted / boastful to the king? 2 What did the miller boast to the king? Are these sentences above considered correct in terms of meaning or question? ThanksRead More...
Hi, bear_bear: You should have said, "Which word choice is suited to the question below?" Sentence (1) is incorrect. You can say: (1a) Was the miller boastful to the king? Sentence (2) is not incorrect, but "boast of" would be more idiomatic: (2a) What did the miller boast of to the king? (2b) Of what did the miller boast to the king? With the corrections I have made, they are correct. You could have used such sentences if you were speaking English hundreds of years ago.Read More...
Last Reply By davidmoderator · First Unread Post

Did + base verb

Is the following sentence should be "did + base verb" ? Why should we use "did" ? Should I cross out the verb "did"? Thanks Peter did park his car near the gate of his house.Read More...
That's exactly right, Hussein. In both examples, emphatic "did" (past tense of "do") would also be emphasized in the speaking of the sentence. For example: A: Peter should have parked his car near the gate of his house. B: Peter did park his car near the gate of his house. (Go and look.) Speaker B's sentence could alternatively be "He did park his car there" or, simply, "He did." The point is that B's sentence would NOT naturally be "Peter parked his car there," which gives no emphasis to...Read More...
Last Reply By davidmoderator · First Unread Post

get it complete / completing / completed

Which is correct? What rules that we follow? Thanks. Since the tasks is hard, Peter has to burn the midnight oil to get it complete / completing / completed on time.Read More...
That's true, David, so true that I always teach my students only the pattern with "to"-infinitive along with the one using the past participle, in pairs of examples like the following: - Peter got a friend to complete the task for him. (active causative meaning) - Peter got his task completed . (passive causative meaning) I agree. I just made the addition in case somebody else came across this thread (that's why I wrote it for the "general public," so to speak).Read More...
Last Reply By gustavocontributor · First Unread Post

only one

1) Only one is a wanderer. Two together are always going somewhere. 2) One alone is a wanderer. Two together are going somewhere. The first sentence is from the famous classic 'Vertigo' by Hitchcock. Scottie : Don't you think it's a waste, to wander separately? Madeleine : Only one is a wanderer. Two together are always going somewhere. Scottie : No, I don't think that's necessarily true. Source: https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Vertigo I think understand the sentence. But is it grammatical?Read More...

grammar question

"Please see Annex 1 and 2 for case studies on our existing clients within the healthcare sector which shows how we have successfully implemented recycling procedures which has reduced overall waste volumes and increased recycling rates." What is the error in this sentence? It doesn't sound right.Read More...
Hello, Jamest83, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange! There are two grammatical errors of the same type in that sentence. In both of the "which"-clauses (relative clauses), a singular verb is used; however, since the antecedent of "which" is plural in each case, and since "which" functions as subject in both relative clauses, a plural verb is needed. Below I have highlighted the head noun of the antecedent of "which" in each relative clause and have changed the verb of the relative clause to...Read More...
Last Reply By davidmoderator · First Unread Post

From/Since

ahmad
Hello, everyone, My dog has been missing since 08 June 2018. My dog has been missing from 08 June 2018. My dog is missing since 08 June 2018. My dog is missing from 08 June 2018. Are all the above sentences correct? If so, do they mean the same thing? Thanks.Read More...
Hi, David, Thanks for your insightful explanation. By the way, the dog was conjectural. So, I am sorry for having made you feel bad at all. Next time, I will be more careful.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

What Say You

ahmad
Hello, everyone, The following is from Faith & Reason Edited by Paul Helm , Chapter 59: David Hume, Analogies and Disanalogies 1. "And what say you to the discoveries in anatomy, chemistry, botany?" 2. "Secondly, you have no reason, on your theory, for ascribing perfection to the Deity, even in his finite capacity; or for supposing him free from every error, mistake, or incoherence, in his undertakings. " I don't understand the structure of the text in bold face in '1'. Can someone...Read More...
Thank you very much for the explanations. Replying with a quote is as fine as it was back in the day, but when a new post is started one must resort to options appearing under the"Format Dropdown Menu". And they surely are not as great as they were earlier.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

with me

1) Getting drunk ends badly with me. Does this mean: a) I end up badly when I get drunk b) Things end up badly when I get drunk c) People end up badly when they get drunk with me d) People end up badly when they get drunk around me e) Things end up badly when people get drunk around me Gratefully, NaviRead More...

redundant element

novice
Globally and internationally , the 1990’s stood out as the warmest decade in the history of weather records. It is a good idea to be careful in buying or purchasing magazines from salespersons who may come to your door. In my opinion , I think you are right. In such sentences, there are redundant elements namely "globally/internationally", "purchasing", "in my opinion" (because there are the similar meaning words or phrases in the same sentences), aren't there? If so, why do I often hear...Read More...
(2) She is beautiful, but she isn't attractive. (3) She is attractive, but she isn't beautiful. Both of those sentences are strange, but I'd say that (3) is much stranger than (2). When the predicates are applied to human beings (holistically applied, not just with respect to certain attributes or traits of theirs), there seems to me to be an entailment relation between attractiveness and beauty which does not hold in reverse. It is asymmetrical. That is why I think that there is no...Read More...
Last Reply By davidmoderator · First Unread Post

how to use the word "scold"

A native English speaker wrote in her book that the word "scold" is old-fashioned and not used in a situation, for example, where a child has caused some trouble at school and his teacher yelled at him." According to the writer, the child would say, "I got in trouble at school today" rather than "I was scolded at school today." If this is correct, why do we often see newspaper articles in which the word "scold" is used as in the following excerpts. Is there any difference in meaning or...Read More...
Hi, Fujibei: Welcome to the new platform! It's nice to see you again. Please review our policy on the use of quotations and source material. You have referred to an author's views in a book without telling us which author or which book you are talking about, and you have used two article quotations without using quotation punctuation or telling us which articles they are from. Please take this as constructive criticism. My intention is not to scold you. I agree with the author that "scold"...Read More...
Last Reply By davidmoderator · First Unread Post

Usage "simple past" and "present perfect"

Hi there, can you please tell me if I should use "past tense" or "present perfect" in an response to the given question asked in present perfect? Here's the context: Mom: Subha, I am sorry. Someone has broken your watch. Me: What!! who did/has done that? I think simple past sounds better. My grammar book(Practical English Usage written Michael Swan) says that simple past tense is preferable. Look at the third example.Read More...
Hi, Subhaji: I agree with you. Both the simple past and the present perfect are possible and grammatical there, but the simple past works better. This is analogous to the use of the definite article to refer to something that has just been introduced with the indefinite article (e.g., "He bought me a doughnut, and the doughnut was very good"). The present perfect, with its indefinite paste-time reference, works well for introducing a past event. Subsequently, that event will naturally be...Read More...
Last Reply By davidmoderator · First Unread Post

Question in "past tense" and answer and explanation in "present tense"

Hi there, I have a question. Suppose someone asks me a question in past tense. I also answers in past tense but in explanation can I mix the tenses? Here is the context: John: Subha, did you sign the petition last night saying you want death penalty of the murder of a little child? Me: Yes, I did. I want the parents of the murdered child get justice so I have signed that/signed that. Which tense should I use in the last part?Read More...
DocV, Thanks a lot for your time.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

PERSONAL AND IMPERSONAL PASSIVE

Is it Ok to use "suggest" in the following form: The party is suggested to (be / being) cancelled?Read More...
Hi, Ayman, Thank you for sending us a picture of the page in question, which confirms what David has told you. According to the book, "suggest" can only be used with pattern (B), that is: - It + be + suggested + that + Subject + verb in the indicative mood (in this case "suggest" is similar to "indicate" or "hint"): It has been suggested that the party was cancelled. - It + be + suggested + that + Subject + verb in the subjunctive mood (in this case "suggest" is synonymous with "recommend"):...Read More...
Last Reply By gustavocontributor · First Unread Post

superlative

1. He completed the test most quickly in our class. 2. He completed the test the most quickly in our class. 3. He completed the test the quickest in our class. Which are the correct choices? Thank you!Read More...
Hi, Ruifeng: Sorry for the delay. The awkwardness of your sentences was a bit of a turn-off at first, and then your question slid down the page. Now that I've returned to your question, I see the source of the awkwardness. The problem is that your sentences all correctly express where or in what circumstances he (habitually) completed the test (the) quickest / most quickly , whereas you are SURELY trying to say something else, something that is expressed by sentences such as the following:...Read More...
Last Reply By davidmoderator · First Unread Post

Omission of Subject

ahmad
Hello, everyone, Supposing ‘1’ and '2' are correct, is there a way that ‘3’ can be acceptable? I highly doubt that that might be the case. 1. I read somewhere that if I was worried that the course of action that I was to embark upon/had embarked upon was not the right one, I should do XYZ. 2. I read somewhere that if I was worried that the course of action that I was to embark upon/had embarked upon was not the right one, it would be advisable to do XYZ. 3. I read somewhere that if I was...Read More...
Thanks, David.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

Seeking your kind assistant.

Hi, Kindly request your assistance to correct this sentence:(The main purpose of the meeting would be update from each sectors on how is going activities and also to update ourselves with our activity remaining budget). Thank you and looking forward of your correcting to this email sentence.Read More...
Hi, Teata: You're new to the forum, so I will help you out with this question of yours; however, it's important for you to know that discussion topics at the Grammar Exchange should concern particular grammatical topics. They should not be requests for editing assistance. Does that make sense to you? That having been said, I recommend the following revision, on the basis of what I think whoever wrote the sentence is probably trying to say: "The main purpose of the meeting would be for each...Read More...
Last Reply By davidmoderator · First Unread Post

It's a long time

husseinhassan
Hello, our teacherS, I'd like to say "It's a long time since Ahmed last visited his village." in another way. Could you please, help me choose the correct structure? 1. It IS a long time since Ahmed ( visited / has visited ) his villages. 2. It HAS BEEN a long time since Ahmed ( visited / has visited ) his village. With regard to the new look of GE, Please, tell me how to: 1 . Highlight important words in bold type. 2. Use colours. 3. Search for a specific thread. A bunch of thanks in advance.Read More...
Yes, Hussein. Those features are not available on cell phones.Read More...
Last Reply By gustavocontributor · First Unread Post

Past participle

novice
Hi, 1. Heard in the next room, her voice is like that of a boy. 2. Having been heard in the next room, her voice is like that one of a boy 3. Hearing in the next room, her voice is like the sound of a boy. 4. Hearing in the next room, her voice is like the one of a boy. Which one is correct? I assume A is correct. It can be revised as: Her voice is heard in the next room. It is like the voice of a boy. Would you mind telling me whether I am right or wrong?Read More...
Gustavo, I agree with everything you say here. I particularly appreciate your explanation of why "from" works better than "in". Novice, you wrote "I assume A is correct". I assume that you meant that you assume that (1) is correct. Your indices are all numbers, so there is no (A). I do appreciate your using indices, though, something that was sorely missing in How to ask for help and thank somebody politely Long lists like that are difficult to address without them. Is there any chance you...Read More...
Last Reply By docvguestcontributor · First Unread Post

Please, I need some help with these grammar questions!

1 - What is the function of the noun clause(s) in the following sentence? "Jennifer doesn't believe that Ron was at the office last night and she thinks that he might be cheating on her." a) Object of the clause b) subject of the clause c) object of the preposition d) subject complement 2 - How many clauses are in this sentence? (including the independent clause) "When Jessica feels sad, she likes to listen to sad songs, which somehow helps her feel better." a) 2 b) 3 c) 4 d) 5 3 - What type...Read More...
Hello, Hert009. This is the first time I see you here, so welcome to the Grammar Exchange! I guess you know the meaning of "exchange," don't you? When people exchange ideas, one expresses a view and another either agrees or disagrees. Your post containing ten questions looks very much like an exercise you are supposed to do for homework, am I right? Rather than just give you the answers (and do the homework for you), we would prefer for you to tell us which you think is the right answer to...Read More...
Last Reply By gustavocontributor · First Unread Post

Usage of "A" and plural nouns without "any"

Can anyone please tell me if the following sentence sounds right. And have I used the article a correctly? Can I used the plural form photo without any ? John: Hey Subha, did you post photos on Facebook last night? Me: No, I didn't post (any)photos but posted a status. John: Hey Subha, did you post a photo on Facebook last night? Me: No, I didn't post a photo but posted a status .Read More...

The difference between lack, shortage and deficiency

novice
Hi, Would you be kind to tell the difference between 3 words lack, shortage and deficiency? For example, which word is better to fill in the blank in the sentence: The water ______ in this area has resulted in poor crop production. According to Oxford Dictionary, - shortage is a situation where something is not enough for everyone - lack is the state of not having or having not enough something - deficiency is the state of not having or having not enough something that is essential In the...Read More...
Thank you so much. ♥Read More...
Last Reply By novice · First Unread Post

only + negation

Which are correct and make sense: 1) He doesn't watch a movie only on Fridays. He watches one on Tuesdays as well. 2) He doesn't watch a movie only on Fridays. He watches one every other day of the week. He watches a movie every day of the week except on Friday. 3 ) He only doesn't watch a movie on Fridays. He watches one on Tuesdays as well. 4 ) He only doesn't watch a movie on Fridays. He watches one every other day of the week. He watches a movie every day of the week except on Friday. 5)...Read More...
Hello, Navi, The more movies, the better. I find all but (3) -- yes, the red sentence -- to be correct and sensible. What you've done with (1) and (2) is fascinating. The first sentence of each is identical, but the meaning is totally different. In (1), the meaning of "He doesn't watch a movie only on Fridays" is that it is not only on Fridays that he watches a movie . In (2), by contrast, the meaning of the same sentence is that it is only on Fridays that he doesn't watch a movie ! The...Read More...
Last Reply By davidmoderator · First Unread Post

wasn't tall like his brother

1) He wasn't tall as his brother was. 2) He wasn't tall like his brother. Do these sentence mean: a) He was tall but not as tall as his brother. or b) He wasn't as tall as his brother. (Maybe he wasn't tall, and maybe even his brother wasn't tall) Another meaning could be c) His brother was tall but he wasn't. Gratefully, NaviRead More...
Hello, Navi, Sentence (1) doesn't work, in my opinion. If it is to mean (b), the first "as" can't be omitted, though a speaker might get away with omitting it in informal speech, i.e., in conversation. It should be "wasn't as tall as." Sentence (2) means (c). Now, if you added a comma after "tall" in (1), the sentence would work: " He wasn't tall, as his brother was ." But the meaning would become (c). You would sacrifice the "wasn't as tall as" meaning altogether. ♣Read More...
Last Reply By davidmoderator · First Unread Post

inf vs have P.P

Egyptian Ministry Third Mock Exam 5- They are expected ……….the cup. A to win B to have been won C to have won D that they would win I think that "a" and "c" are both correct, aren't they?Read More...
Thanks David. Your answer is clear and I do understand the difference. I needed a confirmation. Thanks again.Read More...
Last Reply By rashaassem · First Unread Post

Comma/No Comma

ahmad
Hello, everyone, The following is from A DICTIONARY OF PHILOSOPHICAL LOGIC by Roy T. Cook . The comma after ‘property’ seems wrong to me. My reason for that is that if I come up with a sentence of the same structure, however shorter in length, it won’t require a comma. For instance, 1. His journey from being an average student to a brilliant one was short. Thanks. PS: By the way, do I need to set off the part 'from ....one' in commas?Read More...
David, Thanks a lot for the clarification. That is great and, of course, abundantly apparent. PS: Since DocV and Gustavo don't seem to have any interest in decorations, it is time I took the opportunity myself. ♠Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

Adverb Position

ahmad
Hello, everyone, 1. It is deceptively simple. 2. Deceptively, it is simple. I believe '1' means something like this: The thing/process etc., seems simple, but that is not so. The apparent is deceptive. Does '2' mean this: When viewed from a vantage point of deception, the thing seems simple, which it is not. But if that is the case (in '2'), won't that be more like self-deception than deception? Can some correct me here, because I am surely missing something crucial here? Thanks.Read More...
No need for that, sir. I don't think I should inconvenience you with that. I am immensely indebted to you for all the efforts you put in to keep this forum alive. Answering such a myriad of questions sun to sun is something to be respected for the nobility inherent to it. Sir, I thank you.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

Clean / Cleaned?

Which is correct? I could get the toilet clean / cleaned. Thanks.Read More...
Thanks for telling me my thread before. Btw, It's not very convenient to look back the previous threads. Could you please try to "squeeze" all the previous threads in "personal activities stream" ? Just as like the old version that we can find the threads page by page. Thanks. it's my point of view. Hopefully it'll be useful in future.Read More...
Last Reply By bearbear · First Unread Post

Nouns

ahmad
Hello, everyone, 1. Worries are likely to increase under such circumstances. 2. Crimes are likely to increase under such circumstances. 3. Criminals are likely to increase under such circumstances. 4. The number of criminals is likely to increase under such circumstances. 5. The number of worries is likely to increase under such circumstances. I believe ‘3’ is outright incorrect unless ‘increase’ is post modified (which would change the meaning drastically). If I am correct, what explains...Read More...
Hi, Ahmad, I agree with you that (3) is incorrect unless "increase" is post-modified. But if you post-modify it with the prepositional phrase "in number," the meaning will not change drastically. Indeed, the semantics will be parallel to that of the others: (3a) Criminals are likely to increase in number in such circumstances. Or you could say: " There is likely to be an increase in the number of criminals under such circumstances ." I prefer that. I even like (4) better than (3a). My point...Read More...
Last Reply By davidmoderator · First Unread Post

"A" vs "Any"

Hi there, What the difference between a and any in the following sentence? Are they both grammatical in the following sentence? Yesterday I went to a village that was so uninhabited. After a mile of walking I did not find a house/any house(s) in that area. What's difference do a house and any houses make in the sentence? And can I use any house instead of any houses in the sentence?Read More...
Hi, Subhajit, I believe the questions of this sort, coming mostly from you, have already been answered in detail. I suggest you go over your earlier posts. You are stuck with 'a', 'any', and 'the', while you neglect other areas. I see many a problem with your post. You should read more than you currently do, and soon half your questions would be answered by the exercise. You can discard my advice, but that won't be advisable. Thanks. PS: Last year in October (give or take a week or two) , a...Read More...
Last Reply By ahmad · First Unread Post

pose

novice
Hi, When posed with a complicated mathematical equation, some students seek the assistance of a teacher. A. solved B. presented C. informed D. spaced The given answer is B. However, I suspect that the question is incorrect because something such as a question/a threat/a challenge can be posed but we can't pose a someone. Am I wrong? Thank you.Read More...
Hi David: I forgot to tell you that I had to find a word that has the similar meaning to "posed" from four options. I can't show my gratitude to you because through your explanation, I seem to learn more things than what I ask about.Read More...
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turn on/ turn up

novice
Hi, You looked exhausted. I think you’ve ______ more than you can handle. A. turned on B. taken up C. turned up D. taken on When I look them up in Oxford Dictionary, I rule out A and C but I am confused between B and D. Take up st means beginning or starting st such as a job Take on sb/st means deciding to do st or being agree to be responsible for sb/st Which one is the best appropriate in this situation? and What is the difference between take on and take up? Thank you.Read More...
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Last Reply By novice · First Unread Post

How to ask for help and thank somebody politely

novice
Hi, Could you please suggest some ways to ask for help and thank somebody politely? Thank you.Read More...
Hi, David. When I want to ask someone for help formally and politely (most often in this forum), I often use some structures as below: - Would/Could you do something? - Would you mind doing something? - Would you be kind to do something? When I want to express my gratitude to someone, I often use: - Thank you very much for your help/kindness/explanation - I appreciate your help - It's kind of you to help me. - Many thanks to you. But when I ask too many questions, it seems a little bit...Read More...
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