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Should I have quotation marks around the bold stuff?

See the two bold things here: https://join.substack.com/p/control Detmer comments as follows in the interview and note that “CRT” is short for “critical race theory” And also look at the two bold things here: https://join.substack.com/p/ho...ld-history-be-taught Zinnophobia is inherently important, but it’s also extra important right now due to all of the controversy around “critical race theory” — “CRT” is short for “critical race theory” .Read More...
It's such a headache to try to navigate when to put "critical race theory" in quotation marks...see the three below instances here in bold: https://join.substack.com/p/ho...ld-history-be-taught Zinnophobia is inherently important, but it’s also extra important right now due to all of the controversy around “critical race theory” —“CRT” is short for “critical race theory” . https://join.substack.com/p/control Detmer comments as follows in the interview and note that “CRT” is short for...Read More...
Last Reply By Andrew Van Wagner · First Unread Post

Should I separate this list's elements with semicolons?

I often wonder about when to do this...sometimes I just get the instinct to do this because the list seems to be a bit "busy" and therefore I want to demarcate the list's elements very clearly. See here: https://join.substack.com/p/control the new law makes “every child in the state who is already in private school or being homeschooled eligible for the new funds” right away; means an “immediate cost increase of nearly $600 million”; and opens “the door for all of Arizona’s 1.1 million...Read More...

direct object or adverb - an infinitive verb

From WSJ today - A closer look at the numbers behind summer vacation shows the growing importance of holiday weekends, which helps explain how travel has defied predictions of its demise to emerge from the pandemic stronger than ever. Is the infinitive verb "to emerge from the pandemic stronger than ever" the direct object of verb "defied" or an adverb to define "defied"? thanks.Read More...
A closer look at the numbers behind summer vacation shows the growing importance of holiday weekends, which helps explain [ how travel has defied predictions of its demise t o emerge from the pandemic stronger than ever ] . I'm inclined to say that the underlined infinitival clause is an adjunct in clause structure. It functions as a modifier in the bracketed clause, where it indicates a resultant or subsequent meaning.Read More...
Last Reply By billj · First Unread Post

the expression [as well as] is a preposition or a conjunction?

[as well as] is a preposition or conjunction? when can we use it as a preposition and when as a conjunction?Read More...
Hi, Maged Hosny, As a linker of addition, "as well as" is halfway between both parts of speech. Quirk and Greenbaum define it as a quasi-coordinator. On page 275 of their A University Grammar of English , they explain that quasi-coordinators sometimes resemble coordinating conjunctions and give this example: - He publishes as well as prints his own books. But they add that they can also have a prepositional or subordinating role, as in: - As well as printing the books, he publishes them.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

Ladies man

Hi, Are these definitions of 'a lady's man' below I got from the internet all true? 1. A lady's man is someone who's popular with the ladies. 2. A Ladies man enjoys pleasing women and being adored by them, including sleeping with them. 3. When you are a ladies' man you get more attention, admiration, dates, and intimacy than the average guy. 4. A lady's man is very fond of the company of women and who, because of his charm, attentiveness, and flirtatiousness, is very attractive to them. 5. A...Read More...
It's still OK to use "lady's man." Opinions will differ as to how old-fashioned it is. Similar terms include "Romeo," "Cassonova," "Don Juan," "Prince Charming."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Does "OK" apply to the bold?

I have the following: https://join.substack.com/p/are-conspiracy-theories-dangerous “OK, people don’t really want to talk about Vietnam, but I can do a movie about the JFK assassination and that way I can slide Vietnam into the conversation .” I'm not sure if "OK" applies to the bold; one might imagine that I'd put a period after "Vietnam" and "capitalize "but" and make a new sentence starting with "But I can do a movie..." if I wanted "OK" to not apply to the bold, but I'm not sure if that...Read More...
Hi, Andrew—No, "OK" does not apply to the part of the sentence in bold. It applies only to the first clause. That clause spells out the meaning of "OK" in the context; it is the proposition to which "OK" expresses assent. It's like saying: "I recognize that people don't really want to talk about Vietnam." Notice that it would be possible to have: " OK, but I can do a movie about the JFK assassination . That way I can slide Vietnam into the conversation." Even in this case, "OK" would not...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Reduction in real english sentences

Hello, I have come across the sentences from NPR. ''When the fighter jet crashed into these northwestern Ukrainian woods, killing its 27-year-old pilot, splintering trees and spewing fuel, it tore a gash in the forest canopy. Then it exploded. The wildfire that followed charred trees and earth, threatening two nearby villages.'' I can understang what the writer meant, but I am not sure about the grammar structure. In my opinion, it should be like this; ''''When the fighter jet crashed into...Read More...
Hi, Erdal K., In English, we can use V-ing to refer to previous, simultaneous or subsequent actions performed by the subject of the main or a higher-level clause. In the first sentence, there is an adverbial clause starting with "when" whose subject, "the fighter jet," is the subject of "crashed" as well as of "killing," "splintering" and "spewing," all of which are contained within the same "when"-clause, so there's nothing grammatically wrong with that. In the second sentence, "the...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

How should I deal with these three issues?

1: Should I hyphenate the two bold words to make "JFK-assassination"? "I don't pay attention to this JFK assassination nonsense." 2: Wouldn't it be excessive to hyphenate the two bold words to make "conspiracy theorists", even though technically you can see an argument for that? I do this all the time on Facebook and will never convert hardcore conspiracy theorists 3: How should I format the bold? Looks like "advisory" should be lowercase...I think ...? And I doubt that I need to hyphenate...Read More...
1. Well, if we were visiting earth from another planet, I suppose "JFK [assassination nonsense]" could be interpreted as being some brand of assassination nonsense. Fortunately, human beings have common sense. We don't need to be so heavy-handed in punctuation that we are writing for those who lack common sense or who wish perversely to misunderstand. 2. If you mean "[hardcore conspiracy] theorists," then you should go right ahead and use a hyphen. What "hardcore conspiracy theorists" means...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Is it OK to have sentences that don't diagram in just one way?

I think that I asked something very similar to this before, but consider this sentence: https://join.substack.com/p/are-conspiracy-theories-dangerous I do this all the time on Facebook, and I’ll never convert hardcore conspiracy theorists, but I can actually reach a large number of people who are in the middle and who are just curious about what people are talking about. So it has the following structure: X, and Y, but Z. Does the "but" attach only to Y? Or to X? Or to X and Y? Not sure if...Read More...
Thanks so much for this incredible help! I really appreciate it! I'll go with the third option that you mentioned!Read More...
Last Reply By Andrew Van Wagner · First Unread Post

Will / Going to?

Hi, I'm a bit confused about using "will" and "going to" to make predictions. So I'd like to know what should we use in these sentences: -The ending of this series is somber. You will / are going to be traumatized. -Look out! You will / are going to fall! -This story will / is going to be a scandal. Thanks!Read More...
Hi, Lou, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange, Both are correct, however, 'will' works better here because there is no present reality. It is a kind of exaggeration. 'Are going to' is the logical answer here. It is something that is about to happen, not something in the remote future. Both are correct.Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

What part of speech is the word "anger"?

Hi! Could I ask you what part of speech is the word "anger" in the following sentence: (1) He is slow to anger. I thought that the "anger" there would be an intransitive verb, but I just realized that it might be a noun. I would appreciate it if you could share your thought. Thank you!Read More...
Hi, Ahmed, Thank you, you helped me a lot!Read More...
Last Reply By yasukotta · First Unread Post

Meaning of "when"

1. You don't seem to know when you are lucky. ( Context will be shown in the picture below) I think "know" is used intransitively, with when-clause being adverbial. Another analysis is that "know" is a transitive verb here, and the when -clause, being a norminal relative clause, functions as its object. The latter analysis suggests "when" is in the same sense as: 2. Do you remember when we went to Norway? That was a good trip. (LDOCE) I'm not sure I agree. What do you think?Thank you.Read More...
Greetings, While I find BillJ's analysis plausible, I think there is something to be said for the analysis toward which you are inclined, Robby. Please note that BillJ is not saying the "when"-clause is a "nominal relative clause"; he is saying the "when"-clause is a subordinate interrogative clause, i.e., an embedded question. I feel that there may have been some miscommunication when you asked whether "know" could alternatively be analyzed as intransitive in "You don't seem to know when...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

practice <thinking> divergently

Hello, everyone, “In role-play, children act as if they are someone else, imagining and weighing possibilities. This helps them analyze situations from different perspectives. Pretending to be someone else, with all the gestures, actions, and language that involves, gives children practice thinking divergently as they consider different things they can pretend to do.” How to parse the thinking in the underlined part will be correct in following two ways?; 1) ‘gives children practice of...Read More...
Hi, Gustavo and David, really thanks for your supports as always.Read More...
Last Reply By deepcosmos · First Unread Post

Complex Object + adverbs

Hello, Everyone. Could you help me with the Complex Object? The task is to combine two sentences using the Complex Object. I could hear it perfectly well. They were discussing me. => I could hear them discussing me. Where can I put "perfectly well" in the sentence with the Complex Object (e.g., I could hear them perfectly well discussing me)? Or do I have to omit it? Thank you in advance.Read More...
Hi, Annetik, I'd put "perfectly well" in the middle of the verb phrase to avoid cutting off the accusative -ing structure: - I could perfectly well hear them discussing me.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

How to understand the annotation "also"

Greetings, everyone. I'm sometimes confused by notations from the dictionary. Simply put, I don't understand what it is trying to convey. Here is one example. Negotiation: NOUN [mass noun] ( also negotiations) Discussion aimed at reaching an agreement: 1. a worldwide ban is currently under negotiation 2. negotiations between unions and employers 3. It took five months of negotiations between the two parties to have the agreement in place. How should I understand the notation " also...Read More...
If it said to be a mass noun, it cannot be "also used in the plural." When used in the plural, it is a count noun.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

fruit from the tree

a. They ate the fruit that was on the tree. b. They ate the fruit from the tree. c. They ate the tree's fruit. d. They ate fruit that was on the tree. e. They ate fruit from the tree. f. They ate some of the tree's fruit. Are all of the sentences grammatically correct? Do the first three imply that they ate all of the fruit on that tree? Many thanks.Read More...

On the day when you move

Supposedly, your friend is moving her home and you wanted to give her an instruction/guide. Is the below sentence grammatically correct? On a moving day, if you use a Ute, you can park in the loading bay and use the closest lift to get to level 1 or On the day when you move if you use a Ute, you can park in the loading bay and use the closest lift to get to level 1Read More...

"If + ing" possible?

Hello Grammar Exchange members! (a) Only when he needed some help did he call me. (b) Only if we invest more money can we save the company. I'd like to ask you whether or not the dependent clauses in (a) and (b) can be reduced. To the best of my knowledge "Only when he needed some help" can be reduced to "Only when needing some help" as in (c) because the subject in the dependent clause is the same as the subject in the main clause. (c) Only when needing some help did he call me. However, I...Read More...
Excellent point, Gustavo. I suspected that lurking in my grammatical blindspot was some type of acceptable reduced-adverbial-clause -ing construction following "if." You have found it and have described its semantics very well.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Can anyone help out with these loose ends that I have to resolve?

I promise not to bug this forum for a while if I can get some help with these things! :) 1: https://thegrammarexchange.infopop.cc/topic/should-i-do-two-layers-of-quotation-marks-here 2: https://thegrammarexchange. infopop.cc/topic/how-do-you- deal-with-the-issue-of-a- pattern-applying-to-multiple- elements 3: https://thegrammarexchange. infopop.cc/topic/no-quite-a- grammar-issue-but-what-does- home-city-mean 4: https://thegrammarexchange. infopop.cc/topic/i-don-t-want-...Read More...
Personally, I don't feel I can help you any more than I already have. David has also given you some good answers. I'm afraid you might be looking for some hard-and-fast rules where there are none. That colleague you once mentioned might be right about your being too demanding when it comes to editing. I hope we can continue to be of help with other topics.Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

so ~ enough to ~

The boy is not so old enough to go to high school. Which is same meaning to above sentence? 1) The boy is so old that he can't go to high school. or 2) The boy is not so old that he can't go to high school and second question.. What is the situation? The boy must be too young? or too old? for example, 7 year old boy or 30 year old?Read More...
Then, what is the meaning as follows. a) The boy(or gury) is not so old that he can go to high school. b) The guy(or boy) is not so old that he can't go to high school. q1) Are those sentence correct? q2) If right, can I rewrite as follows?": a) The boy is not old enough to go to high school. (meaning he must be under 10 year old.) b) The boy is too old to go the high school (meanging he must be over 30 year old )Read More...
Last Reply By sly · First Unread Post

along with that comes

Hi, "Unfortunately, along with that comes a lot of challenges.." Could you please explain what it means? What is the subject in the sentence? Thank you very much.Read More...
Hi, Kuen—The sentence has inversion and an incorrect verb form. The subject is "a lot of challenges," which is plural. "A lot of" quantifies "challenges," the plural head of the subject noun phrase: "Unfortunately, a lot of challenges come along with that" / "Unfortunately, along with that come a lot of challenges."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Is there a meaning difference?

" I'd like to use the pan to bake bread " " I'd like to use the pan and bake bread ' Is there a big difference between the two sentences? And, if there is a not big difference, which do you say? ThanksRead More...
Hello, Nagy—If, as I suspect, you want to bake bread in the pan, you can use "I'd like to use the pan to bake bread." If you want to do two separate things, to use the pan (perhaps for pancakes) and to bake bread (perhaps in something other than the pan), you can use "I'd like to use the pan and bake bread."Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Happy to hear from you that.

Hi. We know this should read “Happy to hear that from you” but why? Thanks for any input. Is this just an unusual ditransitive verb situation?Read More...
Hi, Perriced—In the adjective phrase (not a sentence) "Happy to hear that from you," "that" functions as the direct object of "hear." "From you" is an (optional) prepositional-phrase adjunct/modifier. The complement of the verb (the direct object) needs to come before the adjunct modifying that entire verb phrase, except in special cases where the direct object is "heavy" enough to be post-posed: We are happy to hear from you the exciting news about your daughter's being admitted to such a...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Should I do two layers of quotation marks here?

This is a tough one; see bold below. https://join.substack.com/p/should-2a-exist regarding abortion, Alito’s leaked draft says that women shouldn’t have a right to abortion because court decisions should “give primacy” to what’s “‘deeply rooted in this Nation’s history and tradition’” —women were property until very recently, so obviously you won’t find any basis for women’s rights in “history and tradition” It's sort of a standard phrase , but I don't want to put words in Chomsky's mouth,...Read More...
Thanks so much! It's not quite Alito saying it, though, is it? I'm not sure the phrase's exact origin or how to attribute it, though certainly Alito's leaked draft mentions it...what do you think?Read More...
Last Reply By Andrew Van Wagner · First Unread Post

Pronunciation of UK

Hi. I hope you entertain questions on pronunciation. When we say ' the UK ', do we place the stress on the U or on the K ? In other words, is it pronounced as U-k (with the U being said a little higher/louder then the K and the voice dipping/falling when the k is pronounced) or u-K (with the K being the dominant letter and having a sort of a rising tone)? I have always said it as the u-KAY , but I was listening to a British speaker today and she said that she is from Oxford in 'the U-kay '.Read More...
Hi, David. Thank you for your prompt response and the links that confirm the pronunciation. It's a relief to know that I wasn't pronouncing it wrongly Thanks so very much for your help.Read More...
Last Reply By gilbert · First Unread Post

Just looking to tie up loose ends!

Thanks for your incredible help on this forum; I really don't know what I would do without this forum. I should really have to pay for this service! :) I still need help with the below threads, so I wonder if anyone saw these threads: https://thegrammarexchange. infopop.cc/topic/how-do-you- deal-with-the-issue-of-a- pattern-applying-to-multiple- elements https://thegrammarexchange. infopop.cc/topic/no-quite-a- grammar-issue-but-what-does- home-city-mean https://thegrammarexchange.Read More...

paintings that were on the walls

a. They stole the diamonds and precious paintings that were on the walls. b. The diamonds, and precious paintings that were on the walls, were stolen. Were all of the precious paintings that were on the walls stolen, or some of them only, or that is unclear? Many thanks,Read More...
Hi, Azz and Ahmed—Thank you, Ahmed, for your useful comments on Azz's pair of sentences here. I'm going to take a somewhat different approach because I think that Azz's question here has strictly to do with syntax and logic. In (a), it is unclear whether "all of the precious paintings that were on the walls" were stolen or whether only some of them were. It is also unclear in (a) whether the diamonds were on the walls or whether only the precious paintings were. Syntactically, (a) may be...Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

an engineer and an entrepreneur

1) I was talking to an engineer and entrepreneur. Can we be sure that I was talking to one person? 2) I was talking to an engineer and an entrepreneur. Can we be sure that I was talking to two people? 3) An engineer and entrepreneur walked into the room. Can we be sure one person walked into the room? 4) An engineer and an entrepreneur walked into the room. Can we be sure two people walked into the room? 5) He is the son of an engineer and entrepreneur. Can we be sure one parent is both an...Read More...

If the first vampire <came> into existence

Hello, everyone, “Costas Efthimiou is a University of Central Florida physics professor claims he has mathematic proof that the vampires–at least as they are depicted in legend–simply can’t exist. The logic goes something like this: “On Jan 1, 1600, the human population was 536,870,911. If the first vampire came into existence that day and bit one person a month, there would have been two vampires by Feb. 1, 1600 . A month later there would have been four, and so on. In just two-and-a-half...Read More...
Hi, Gustavo, really appreciate. With my sincere RESPECTs to You.Read More...
Last Reply By deepcosmos · First Unread Post

at the federal level vs at state level

Hello! The following is an excerpt from The Economist: The idea is to discourage drug smugglers by taking away their profits. At the federal level , forfeited assets go into a dedicated fund. But at state level , various rules apply. In Indiana, for example, extra money goes to a general school fund. ( https://www.economist.com/unit...0/the-sheriffs-stash ) Would you please explain to me why "federal level" takes the definite article while "state level" doesn't?Read More...
Thank you!Read More...
Last Reply By alexey-86 · First Unread Post

Reduction in sentence

Hello, I have came across this sentence. ''A creative leader is self-aware and not weighed down with insecurities, constantly worrying about how they are perceived by their employees and peers. '' what is the long form of the sentence? Is it possible like that; ''A creative leader is self-aware and not weighed down with insecurities, which is constantly worrying about how they are perceived by their employees and peers. '' Best regardsRead More...
Hi, Erdal, First of all, please note that the participle of "come" is "come," not "came": - I have come across this sentence. In reply to your question, "constantly worrying" refers to the subject "a creative leader" but is governed by "not." The subject complement is formed by two main components: - A creative leader is self-aware and (is) not [ weighed down with insecurities, constantly worrying about how they are perceived by their employees and peers ].Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

prevent him <from doing / doing>

Hello, everyone, 1) “Friction can be a useful force because it prevents our shoes slipping on the pavement when we walk and stops car tyres skidding on the road . When you walk, friction is caused between the tread on shoes and the ground. This friction acts to grip the ground and prevent sliding.” *source; https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize...nrd/articles/zxqrdxs 2) Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English Online; ‘prevent somebody/something ( from ) doing something’ My questions are as...Read More...
Hi, David, really appreciate your clear explanation.Read More...
Last Reply By deepcosmos · First Unread Post

Here, let me...

Hello, everyone. When we want to help someone do something, we often start the sentence/offer with, ' Here , let me (help you with that)'. It's something I would say, anyway. I'm just wondering what here means in that expression. I googled it, but I couldn't find any explanation of what here means in such a structure. I know it's really trivial and maybe even unnecessary to even bother about what it means, but I'd sleep better if I knew. I'd really appreciate your help with this. Many thanks.Read More...
Hahahaha! I tried, David! Thank you so much, David, for putting this in perspective for me. You've enriched my understanding by saying that Here functions as an interjection that is (and I quote from what you wrote) merely performing an abstract function as a discourse marker and social cue . And thank you for the links. Grateful as always, GilbertRead More...
Last Reply By gilbert · First Unread Post

Self-driving cars <is/are> an example

Hello, everyone, “ A newer approach, joint cognitive systems, treats a robot as part of human-machine team where the intelligence is synergistic, arising from the contributions of each agent. The team consists of at least one robot and one human and is often called a mixed team because it is a mixture of human and robot agents. Self-driving cars, where a person turns on and off the driving, is an example of a joint cognitive system . Entertainment robots are examples of mixed teams as are...Read More...
Hi, David, how could I thank you enough? Gustavo has almost saved me from another headache with a conditional sentence. With my sincere RESPECTs to all of you in G/Exchange~!!Read More...
Last Reply By deepcosmos · First Unread Post

What does the "also" here even refer to?

See here: https://www.nytimes.com/2022/06/19/climate/supreme-court-climate-epa.html West Virginia v. E.P.A., No. 20–1530 on the court docket, is also notable for the tangle of connections between the plaintiffs and the Supreme Court justices who will decide their case. The Republican plaintiffs share many of the same donors behind efforts to nominate and confirm five of the Republicans on the bench — John G. Roberts, Samuel A. Alito Jr., Neil M. Gorsuch, Brett M. Kavanaugh and Amy Coney...Read More...
Thank you so much! I think that you totally nailed it!Read More...
Last Reply By Andrew Van Wagner · First Unread Post

How do you deal with the issue of a pattern applying to multiple elements?

So look at this excerpt: https://www.nytimes.com/2022/06/19/climate/supreme-court-climate-epa.html West Virginia v. E.P.A., No. 20–1530 on the court docket, is also notable for the tangle of connections between the plaintiffs and the Supreme Court justices who will decide their case. The Republican plaintiffs share many of the same donors behind efforts to nominate and confirm five of the Republicans on the bench — John G. Roberts, Samuel A. Alito Jr., Neil M. Gorsuch, Brett M. Kavanaugh and...Read More...

the only possibility

a. The only possibility for the show to be cancelled is if it rains. b. The only wa y for the show to be cancelled is if it rains. c. The only way it is possible for the show to be cancelled is if it rains. d. The only possibility for the show to be cancelled is that it rains. e. The only way for the show to be cancelled is that it rains. f. The only way it is possible for the show to be cancelled is that it rains. Which of the above are grammatically correct and meaningful? Many thanksRead More...

No quite a grammar issue, but what does "home city" mean?

Sorry to bother this forum that something isn't really a grammar issue, but see here: https://www.wired.com/story/india-deadly-combination-heat-humidity/ On May 1, 2022, the wet-bulb temperature in Lakshmanan’s home city of Chennai hit 31 degrees Celsius . I took this to mean that Lakshmanan lives in Chennai, but actually this COULD mean either that he lives there or that he grew up there, so which is it? Sorry again for the nuisance.Read More...
this is how I described it: there’s a resident of Chennai —Lakshmanan—whose “job involves standing for long hours outdoors at construction sites, pounding screws with careful precision onto steel rods”Read More...
Last Reply By Andrew Van Wagner · First Unread Post

would rather X would do

1 I would rather he did it this evening. 2 I would rather he would do it this evening. What's the difference?Read More...
1 uses the unreal past and expresses a strong wish. It means that the other person is not in the habit of doing something and I would rather he did it this evening. It is much more common than 2. I think 2 has more than one interpretation. This is could be the future subjunctive, in which we use 'would' instead of 'will' and here the time is not so general as 1. Also, there might be an implied conditional: "I would rather he would do it this evening (if everything went fine)''. A third...Read More...
Last Reply By ahmed_btm · First Unread Post

Repetition of today

Is it correct to repeat "today" in the same sentence? e.g. Great to speak with you today a nd great efforts on completing all the required tasks todayRead More...
Tony, it is unclear to me what the second "today" refers to. Does it refer to the completion of the tasks? What is clearly wrong is that what comes after "and" seems to lack a verb phrase, or part of a verb phrase, to make full sense: - (It was) Great to speak with you today and ((it was) nice to see?) the great efforts ...Read More...
Last Reply By Gustavo, Co-Moderator · First Unread Post

At the top and on the top

Can you provide me some guidelines the best use of at the top and on the top . Are the following sentences correct? 1. You can find your student ID at the top of page 1 of your handout. 2. If you see at the top right hand corner of your screen , you will see.... 3. The difference between 6 and 9 is: 6 the round one is at the bottom, but 9 the round one is at the top 4. Mr Axelson is currently a t the top o f the ranking for the BWFRead More...
Thanks David! 1) Just confirming so in the below sentence, I should use on, instead of at? Mr Axelson is currently on the top of the ranking for the BWF. 2) Just to be safe, as on can be used as a substitute for on. Just use "on" for all sentences. What's your thoughts on this?Read More...
Last Reply By Tony C · First Unread Post

How can you use the word "among"?

These are the posts that I still need help with and that I would be eternally grateful for some help with: https://thegrammarexchange.infopop.cc/topic/can-i-use-normal-quotes-here-if-i-used-double-quotes-elsewhere https://thegrammarexchange.infopop.cc/topic/what-is-good-policy-in-terms-of-narrowing-your-quotations-down https://thegrammarexchange.infopop.cc/topic/i-don-t-want-extremely-to-modify-easily-linked-does-it-do-so-though And I was wondering about the ambiguity regarding "among"...Read More...
Thanks! I'll do that!Read More...
Last Reply By Andrew Van Wagner · First Unread Post

Can I paraphrase "a lot of the problem is X" with the paraphrase "much of the problem is X"?

Is there any semantic difference between the two sentences below? - "A lot of the problem is X." - "Much of the problem is X."Read More...
Thank goodness! I really prefer "much of the problem" so I really wanted to be able to do that paraphrase! Thank you so much for your incredible help!Read More...
Last Reply By Andrew Van Wagner · First Unread Post

to have come

Is there any other way of saying this sentence? What is the difference between "to have come" and "to come"? ▪ There was nowhere for a rock that size to have come from.Read More...
Hi, dukulrahman12345—The sentence may be paraphrased like this: There was nowhere that a rock of that size could have come from. If you changed "to have come" to "to come," the related paraphrase would be: There was nowhere that a rock of that size could come from.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post

Is this just a straight-up error from CNN?

My last 3 posts haven't been responded to by the way; this forum is incredible and useful and wonderful so I'm not in any way complaining of course but I hope one day I can get help with those. See here (note that "role" is singular and the verb "have" doesn't seem to agree with it): https://join.substack.com/p/urgent-16-questions “The role that Trump’s allies in Congress played have been of interest to the committee, which has subpoenaed five House GOP members, including Biggs and House...Read More...
Thanks so much! I really appreciate your help!Read More...
Last Reply By Andrew Van Wagner · First Unread Post

I think to myself now that...

Do both of them mean the same thing? If not, please explain why. I had a hard time understanding the first sentence due to its grammatical issues. Is the first one a "mixed conditional sentence"? 1) I think to myself now that if I didn't have that pen knife from my father I would be dead and my mom, grandma and grandfather would be as well. 2) I think to myself now that if I hadn't had that pen knife from my father I would have been dead/died and my mom, grandma and grandfather would have...Read More...
Hello, dukulrahman12345, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange. Both sentences are correct (assuming "would have been dead" is used in (2)), but they have different meanings. In (1), it is implied that the speaker has the pen knife now . A counterfactual inference about the present is drawn. In (2), it is implied that the speaker had the pen knife in the past . A counterfactual inference about the past and/or the present is drawn.Read More...
Last Reply By David, Moderator · First Unread Post
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