Reply to "2 Synonyms in 1 Sentence/ A comma before "and""

Hello, Blue_Delta_47, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange!

Blue_Delta_47 posted:
I’m wondering whether it looks well-written and, most importantly, grammatically correct to use 2 synonyms at once in my following sentence: 
Pacemaker Cells make up only about 1% of the total number of cardiac muscle cells and constitute the cardiac conduction system.
If it looks well-written and is grammatically correct when the audience read it, do you recommend me using a ‘comma’ after ‘muscle cells’ to prevent it from sounding too long for a sentence?

Your sentence is grammatically correct. There is no rule barring the use of synonymous verbs in a sentence with two coordinated verb phrases. The comma is optional: the sentence is correct with or without it.

What I think would improve the sentence from a stylistic standpoint is making one idea the main idea and the other the background idea, by using a nonrestrictive relative clause:

(A) Pacemaker Cells, which make up only about 1% of the total number of cardiac muscle cells, constitute the cardiac conduction system.

(B) Pacemaker Cells, which constitute the cardiac conduction system, make up only about 1% of the total number of cardiac muscle cells.

Are you sure you want to capitalize "Cells"?

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