Skip to main content

Comma before a modifier

As vital as their igloos, which permit the Innuits to live in reasonable comfort in an icy land, and just as ingenious, is their winter clothing, so perfect in design and material that it makes them nearly impervious to any arctic weather. (Source of this sentence: as vital as their igloos which permit the innuits to live in).

Subject of this sentence is winter clothing (their winter clothing). I faced no trouble to find out what the subject is. As winter clothing is the subject, all verbs assoiciated with winter clothing will be sigular as well.

What is which permit the Innuits to live in reasonable comfort in an icy land talking about? Is it talking about winter clothing? Or is it talking about iglooswhich permit the Innuits to live in reasonable comfort in an icy land contains a verb, permit, which is in plural form. So it is talking about igloos.

 

However, I cannot understand about what and just as ingenious is talking. Is it giving an extra information about igloos? If it did so, was there any necessecity of placing a comma before and? As just as ingenious and which permit the Innuits to live in reasonable comfort in an icy land both modify igloos, and was enough to join them. Why has a comma been placed infront of and?

 

Original Post
×
×
×
×