Reply to "Determiners and Adjectives"

quote:
Possesive pronouns (eg, my etc), object pronouns (mine etc), demonstrative pronouns (this etc).

I was taught that those are pronouns that function as adjectives.


Hi, Reenie, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange!

(Sorry, David, if I didn't tackle the question before, but I don't know much about how things changed in grammar through the years, and rightly assumed you were the one who could give the best possible answer. Now that you've done the difficult part, I guess I can make my small contribution. Smile )

English is only my second language, Reenie, but I never heard of those determiners (possessive or demonstrative) being called pronouns. Notice, however, that demonstrative determiners can function as demonstrative pronouns in the absence of a noun, as is also the case with the possessive determiner his (His book is old / This book is his). Other possessives change depending on whether they are determiners or pronouns: my/mine, her/hers, our/ours, their/theirs. Pronouns substitute for nouns, while determiners modify nouns:

- This (pronoun) is my (determiner) book.
- This (determiner) book is mine (pronoun).

I reserve the term "object pronouns" for those pronouns that typically appear after verbs and prepositions (me, him, her, us, them).

quote:
Could I logically say, then, that adverbs, adjectives, and determiners are all modifiers?


Yes, Reenie. While adjectives and determiners modify nouns, adverbs modify verbs, adjectives or other adverbs.

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