Reply to "Gerund or participle"

It's possible to say "I saw a video clip of your singing as well as "I saw a video clip of you singing. As you discern, there is a slight difference in meaning.

"Your singing" is very correct in rules of formal English. Here, "singing" is the noun form of the verb "sing" (the gerund), and can/should be modified by an adjective, a possessive adjective: "your" in this case. Note that "your singing" might be, in other cases, "'my singing," "his singing," "her singing," "our singing " or "their singing." or "Pavarotti's singing" or "Jenny's singing," etc. Or even "this singing" or "that singing." In this sentence, the focus is on the singing.

"You singing" is also correct in your sentence, "I saw a video clip of you singing." This construction focuses on "you" and "singing" is, as you note, a present participle used to mean "as you were singing."

Rachel
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