Reply to "I am wanting"

Tara,

I think I see the misunderstanding.  To simplify, the dialog went like this:

DocV:  If you'd like suggestions as to how to make your presentation even more elegant, send me an e-mail.  ...  So, you have directly quoted a three-paragraph section from a post ...
Tara:  Sorry DocV, I really don't have any suggestion
DocV:  About what?
Tara:  About this that you said" If you'd like suggestions as to how to make your presentation even more elegant, send me an e-mail."

What I was saying was that I had a suggestion that I wanted to offer to you.  I often try to confine my replies to questions that are actually being asked, rather than correct other things that haven't been asked about (such as the lack of a period after "I really don't have any suggestion").  This is meant out of respect.  I don't want to make you, or any other member, feel stupid.  Participation in this forum is a learning experience for everyone, and some of us are farther along than others.  I offered the e-mail option because, by some accident that occurred about a month ago, you are one of very few members of Grammar Exchange that actually has access to my e-mail address.

The suggestion that I was going to offer had to do with the three-paragraph section that you quoted:

"'I want him to go to nursery school.'
has a subtle difference in meaning from
'I'm wanting him to go to nursery school.'

The first is a simple statement of fact - and expresses a feeling you have that you have no doubt about.

The second is more refelctive: you have had internal doubts - or possibly you think someone may challenge or be surprised at your view. "

Rules of punctuation in English get a bit tricky when multiple-paragraph quotes are defined by actual quotation marks.  The rule is that each paragraph within the quote must begin with an opening quotation mark, but the ending quotation mark only occurs at the end of the entire quote.  Thus, this passage is more correctly rendered as:

"'I want him to go to nursery school.'
has a subtle difference in meaning from
'I'm wanting him to go to nursery school.'

"The first is a simple statement of fact - and expresses a feeling you have that you have no doubt about.

"The second is more reflective: you have had internal doubts - or possibly you think someone may challenge or be surprised at your view."

Notice that I have corrected Mr Cordell's spelling of "reflective" and omitted the space between the period and endquote after "view".

The more elegant presentation involves using indentation rather than quotation marks to show that the passage is a direct quote.  To do this, highlight the passage that is being quoted.  Then select "Formats" on the toolbar as you're editing your post.  This will bring up a menu with "Blocks" as one of the options.  Clicking on "Blocks" will bring up a sub-menu with the option "Blockquotes".  What you end up with should look like this:

'I want him to go to nursery school.'
has a subtle difference in meaning from
'I'm wanting him to go to nursery school.'

The first is a simple statement of fact - and expresses a feeling you have that you have no doubt about.

The second is more reflective: you have had internal doubts - or possibly you think someone may challenge or be surprised at your view.

The primary advantage is that it is immediately obvious to all readers where the quoted material begins and ends.  Also, you don't have to worry about single and double quotation marks and how they need to interact with each other.

For some reason, on my computer screen, the vertical bar on the left is nearly invisible from most angles.  I'm sorry if this is true for you as well, but this is beyond my control.

I hope you find this information helpful.

With regard to your other question:

Sorry, "state verbs express states or conditions which are relatively static.", how can we use them to express a temporary condition?

I think that in the earlier thread, both Rachel and Dr Ibrahim provide equally valid answers.  There are two ways of observing the situation.

The first is to understand the flexibility of the term "relatively" in the term "relatively static".  "Relatively static" can be interpreted to mean "permanent, for all practical purposes":

1: The Rio Grande defines most of the border between the United States and Mexico,

or it can mean a current state that could change at any time:

2: The Senate and the Supreme Court are currently dominated by dangerous right-wing fanatics.

I would say that in both of these examples, the main verbs ("define" and "dominate") are stative.

On the other hand, consider the verb "rotate" in the following sentence:

3: From the standpoint of an observer outside of our solar system, the Earth rotates on its axis 366.2425 times every time it revolves around the Sun.

This is a condition that is likely to remain true long after the facts of (1) and (2) have changed.  And yet, we must consider "rotate" to be an action verb, not a stative verb.

In this universe, everything is temporary.  And the English language is never static.

I hope this was helpful.  If not, let me know and I'll try again.

DocV

PS:  Tara, I got an e-mail earlier indicating that you had made another post to this thread, but I can't find it now.  Is this true, or is it just a glitch in my e-mail system?

×
×
×
×