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Reply to "On the premise or on the premises"

Hi, Tony,

@Tony C posted:

2. I don’t quite get the response to my question 3, why is it better to use for the 2020 income year, instead of in the 2020 income year.

If you say "for," it means that the document corresponds to the 2020 income year. If you say "in," it means that the document was prepared in the 2020 income year. It is clear that you mean to say the former.

@Tony C posted:

We are not satisfied with the tax return completed by you for the 2020 income year, on the premise that no expenditure has been incurred by you, but you reported an expense of $5K.

My interpretation is that the tax return was completed on the premise (= assuming) that no expenditure had been incurred by the taxpayer. This is in clear contradiction with the fact that the taxpayer did report a expense. My feeling is that there is a problem with the commas surrounding the "on the premise" phrase, as well as with its position. I would rewrite the sentence above differently:

- You reported an expense of $5K, so we are not satisfied with the 2020 tax return you completed on the premise that no expenditure has been incurred by you.

- We are not satisfied with the 2020 tax return you completed on the premise that no expenditure has been incurred by you, because you reported an expense of $5K.

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator
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