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Reply to "onto and on to"

Hi, Apple,

"Onto" generally indicates motion of one thing onto another. For example, "He jumped onto the hood of the car."

Because the motion of software onto a computer is figuratively involved in downloading software, "onto" would have been a better choice than "on to."

As to "on to," we use it when "on" and "to" function separately. For example, "drove on" & "to San Francisco" are separate in "They drove on to San Francisco."

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