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Hello, GBLSU,

@GBLSU posted:

Fittingly so, sometimes true genius simply cannot be put into words. (source)

What does <Fittingly so> mean, not <fittingly>?

Are those different?

I cannot find where the sentence in question appears within the text. My understanding is that there could be an em dash instead of the comma to mean that what was said before was correct or appropriate as confirmed by what follows, in this case ("so" refers to what was said before):

Fittingly so — sometimes true genius simply cannot be put into words.

See some other good examples I found on the Internet:

- It was a genuine jazz moment, and fittingly so in an evening full of them. The New York Times - Arts

- "My mother" are the first two words of the opening chapter, and fittingly so. The New York Times - Books

- It tells an epic story: fittingly so, since it is itself epic in scope, ambition and achievement. The Guardian - Books

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