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Reply to "The use of 'are' followed by of"

@Diana Gaus posted:

Thank you for your answers. @David : I found the sentence in a dissertation of a PhD student. The complete sentence is like the following:

'The positive externalities and non-financial are overlooked by students and institutions at their consideration, yet these benefits are of important values and needed by society and the students themselves'.



Hi, Diana—Is the Ph.D. student who wrote this a nonnative speaker of English? The opening  coordinate structure ("the positive externalities and non-financial") does not work: we don't coordinate noun phrases with adjectives (e.g., "the apple and yellow").

Also, I'm not sure what "at their consideration" is supposed to mean. Does "their" refer to "students and institutions"? In any case, despite the fact that seeing the whole sentence gives me little idea as to what the author is trying to say, it appears that he or she does mean to say "are of great value."

@Diana Gaus posted:

Is there a specific condition where the sentence: 'are of important values' needed  rather than these benefits have important values? what about the sentence like "  This may be of your interest', why not this may be your interest.

"Are of important values" is a phrase, not a sentence. As I indicated in my last post, "these benefits are of important values" could be used in a context in which benefits of a certain type were being discussed, namely, benefits which important values have. For example, a benefit of the value of honesty (i.e., of having honesty as a value) is the absence of deception and the evils thereof.

Last edited by David, Moderator
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