Reply to "What does "those" refer to in this sentence?"

Gustavo, Contributor posted:
Answer 2: "those" refers to "advance jobs."


Answer 3: More than necessary, I think "those" makes that exemplification clearer. Without "those," I'd use "as" instead of "such as" (do you agree, David and DocV?):

"It also limits potentially qualified students from participating in the talent pool tapped to fill advance jobs where the work force is dwindling, as (is the case/happens) in science, technology and engineering."

While the phrase starting with "such as" refers back to the noun phrase "advance jobs" --hence the convenience to use "those"--, the "as"-phrase is more like a sentence modifier. Notice that we could replace it with "which": "... which is the case/which happens in science, technology and engineering."

Hi, Apple and Gustavo,

While I fully support your answer as a definite possibility, Gustavo, part of me wonders whether the intended referent of "those" might in fact be "students."

I think we should bear in mind that this is a spoken sentence. It could be that a "such as" phrase relating to "students" has been delayed -- viz.:

  • It also limits potentially qualified students, such as those [students] in science, technology, and engineering, from participating in the talent pool tapped to fill advance jobs where the work force in dwindling.

 

  • It also limits potentially qualified students from participating in the talent pool tapped to fill advance jobs where the work force is dwindling, such as those [students] in science technology, and engineering.

I am inclined toward that interpretation because the article as a whole is focused on students, not jobs. Incidentally, I question the accuracy of "advance jobs."

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