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Which modifying a clause

I've read in most places that "which" can not modify a clause.  However,  I've seen it used that way quite a bit, and I'm trying to see if they're any exceptions to the rule.

This is what I'd like to say:

Option 1 ("which" modifying preceding clause):  "The father got into a physical altercation with the mother, which the child was present for."

These are some alternate ways I can think of saying it, though none of them really seem to work:

Option 2 (appositive phrase): "The father got into a physical altercation, with the mother, which the child was present for."

Option 3 (relative clause): "The father got into a physical altercation, which the child was present for, with the mother."

Option 4 (changing the wording): "The father got into a physical altercation with the mother, and the child was present for the altercation."

Option 5 (leaving the original wording without adding a comma):  "The father got into a physical altercation with the mother which the child was present for."

Last edited by Jacob B.
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