Reply to "Whose"

David, Moderator posted:


Since you have found the example in a legal dictionary, there is a chance that lawyers use "whose" to mean "He whose" or "whosever" or "whoever's." In the OED, the last example of such a usage is by John Milton, in the year 1667.

  • He whose right it is to institute something may abrogate it.
  • Whosever right it is to institute something may abrogate it.
  • Whoever's right it is to institute something may abrogate it.

Actually, David, that phrase seems to be the literal translation of a definition in Latin:

Source: 

As a legal translator, I'd definitely use the first sentence you provided as an option:

  • He whose right it is to institute something may abrogate it.

which is another way of saying:

- Whoever institutes something is entitled to abrogate it.

or the more restrictive:

- Only he who institutes something is entitled to abrogate it.

Attachments

Photos (2)
×
×
×
×