1) Money is better than absolute poverty.
2) A little money is better than absolute poverty.
3) Some money is better than absolute poverty.

4) No money is better than being heavily in debt.

Which of the above are grammatically correct and make sense?
Which are idiomatic?
Which are acceptable in formal English?
.

Gratefully,
Navi

Original Post

I don't really like any of your examples, Navi.

For the first three, these sound better to me:

1a: Having money is better than being in absolute poverty.
2a: Having a little money is better than being in absolute poverty.
3a: Having some money is better than being in absolute poverty.

As to (4), unless you are dealing with criminals, it is nearly impossible to become heavily in debt unless you already have a lot of money to begin with.

DocV

PS: Can you see how (4), as written, could be ambiguous?

Thank you very much, DocV,

The only other meaning meaning I can come up with for '4' is:

5) There isn't any money that is better than being heavily in debt.

But I am not even sure that '5' is a legitimate sentence. How can one compare money with being in debt?

I can't come up with any other meaning.

Gratefully and respectfully,

Navi

 

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