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Please read the following passage.

A widespread use of math in nature makes sense,experts say,  considering the challenges to survival in the wild. By recognizing which bush offers more berries, for instance, or which pack of lions is more fearsome, an animal might improve its own chances of survival.

In thes passage, is it OK to use the phrase,"a pack of lions," instead of "a pride of lions" ?

I have learned the phrase "a pack of" is used for "dogs" or "wolves," etc.

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Hi, mmaassuu,

@mmaassuu posted:

Please read the following passage.

A widespread use of math in nature makes sense,experts say,  considering the challenges to survival in the wild. By recognizing which bush offers more berries, for instance, or which pack of lions is more fearsome, an animal might improve its own chances of survival.

In thes passage, is it OK to use the phrase,"a pack of lions," instead of "a pride of lions" ?

I have learned the phrase "a pack of" is used for "dogs" or "wolves," etc.

What is normal to use is 'a pride of lions', as you have mentioned. Unlike 'a pride of lions', a pack of lions' has only three hits on COCA. So, it is quite clear that it is not common. However, sometimes, people forget a specific word and try to use any word that might convey their intended meaning. In one of our books, I once read 'a family of lions'. It works well and doesn't affect the meaning.

Last edited by ahmed_btm

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