Humans, animals, or physical objects can change as time passes.

For example, a calf turns into a bull, a children turns into an adult, and etc.

In this context, a bull is here. Could we say "the calf was cuter than the bull is" to indicate the different look of the bull in different stages?

If not, what is the better sentence?

In this context, the weather changes day by day.

Why could we use "yesterday's weather" to indicate what the weather was like yesterday, and "today's weather" to indicate what the weather is like today, but why could not we use "yesterday's table" to  indicate what the table was like yesterday, and "today's table" to indicate what the identical table is like today?

Thank you!

 

Original Post

Hi, Levy,

I'm not sure I understand your questions very well, but I'll make a try.

In reference to an adult (person / animal), you can say:

- X person / animal was cuter when he / she / it was young.

or

- X person / animal was cuter as a child / as a calf/puppy/kitten.

The adverbs yesterday, today and tomorrow in the genitive case will generally be followed by more abstract nouns. You can say, for example:

- Today's party is definitely more exciting than yesterday's meeting.

In the case of the table, it is the same table, and that's why the genitive doesn't work. If it is the same table, we can say:

- Today the table looks nicer than it did yesterday.

If it is a different table, then we can say:

- Today's table is nicer than yesterday's. It was a good idea to change it.

Gustavo, Contributor posted:

Hi, Levy,

I'm not sure I understand your questions very well, but I'll make a try.

In reference to an adult (person / animal), you can say:

- X person / animal was cuter when he / she / it was young.

or

- X person / animal was cuter as a child / as a calf/puppy/kitten.

The adverbs yesterday, today and tomorrow in the genitive case will generally be followed by more abstract nouns. You can say, for example:

- Today's party is definitely more exciting than yesterday's meeting.

In the case of the table, it is the same table, and that's why the genitive doesn't work. If it is the same table, we can say:

- Today the table looks nicer than it did yesterday.

If it is a different table, then we can say:

- Today's table is nicer than yesterday's. It was a good idea to change it.

Thank you, Gustavo!

I think you almost understand my question.

In my question, I want to know could we use different nouns to indicate different stages of the same entity (e.g. person, animal, object).

For example, I am a boss now and was an employee.

If I want to compare the responsibility of my different position stage, could we use "the boss has more  responsibility than the employee DID (emphasis for my question).

If not, what is the better sentence?

Meanwhile, you said "today's table is nicer than yesterday's."

The sentence indicates table substitution happens, not table painting happens?(For example, a red table was painted with blue, and now the table is a blue table)

So we can't say today's table is a blue table, yesterday's table was a red table.

Thank you!

 

Levy posted:

In my question, I want to know could we use different nouns to indicate different stages of the same entity (e.g. person, animal, object).

For example, I am a boss now and was an employee.

If I want to compare the responsibility of my different position stage, could we use "the boss has more  responsibility than the employee DID (emphasis for my question).

If not, what is the better sentence?

If you are speaking about different roles or stages of the same person, you can say (notice the tenses):

- Now that I am a boss I have more responsibilites than I did when I was an employee.

- Now that he is a boss he has more responsibilites than he did when he was an employee.

Levy posted:

 Meanwhile, you said "today's table is nicer than yesterday's."

The sentence indicates table substitution happens, not table painting happens?(For example, a red table was painted with blue, and now the table is a blue table)

So we can't say today's table is a blue table, yesterday's table was a red table.

If there is no change of table, then you can say:

- Today the table is brighter than (it was) yesterday. (The genitive case will not be possible in this case.)

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