Skip to main content

I have two questions regarding adverbial adjuncts.

The first one is, in the sentence "The report adds that divorce can have both short-term and long-term effects on children

Is "on children" a prepositional phrase functioning as an adverbial adjunct, or is it included in the noun phrase direct object? And if it is an adjunct, what kind of adjunct is it?

The second questions is about this sentence: 

"Three mechanisms are given for the prospective effect of marriage, the main one being that it acts as a buffer against  stress and anxiety." 

Is "For the prospective effect of marriage" an adverbial adjunt of reason or an adverbial adjunct of purpose?

Original Post

Hello, Lucas, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange.

@Lucas09 posted:

The first one is, in the sentence "The report adds that divorce can have both short-term and long-term effects on children

Is "on children" a prepositional phrase functioning as an adverbial adjunct, or is it included in the noun phrase direct object? And if it is an adjunct, what kind of adjunct is it?

The phrase "on children" is an adverbial adjunct of place — not a physical but a figurative one, but a place after.

@Lucas09 posted:

"Three mechanisms are given for the prospective effect of marriage, the main one being that it acts as a buffer against  stress and anxiety." 

Is "For the prospective effect of marriage" an adverbial adjunt of reason or an adverbial adjunct of purpose?

The sentence above is somewhat strange semantically speaking, and since you are asking us the concept the "for"-phrase expresses, the definition is not so easy. Where have you taken it from? I wouldn't think of the condition of being a buffer against stress an anxiety as a mechanism.

I'd classify the adjunct as one of subject-matter, being more or less equivalent to "regarding/in connection with the prospective effect of marriage."

Last edited by Gustavo, Contributor

 

The sentence above is somewhat strange semantically speaking, and since you are asking us the concept the "for"-phrase expresses, the definition is not so easy. Where have you taken it from? I wouldn't think of the condition of being a buffer against stress an anxiety as a mechanism.

I'd classify the adjunct as one of subject-matter, being more or less equivalent to "regarding/in connection with the prospective effect of marriage."

Hello, I'm from Argentina and I am taking a language course in the University. I was given some passages to analyse and I found this sentence in one of them.

I'll attach a picture of the passage to this answer, the sentence is highlighted in black in the second column.

Thank you so much for your answer!

Attachments

Images (1)
  • Marriage is the key to long, healthy life
@Lucas09 posted:

Hello, I'm from Argentina and I am taking a language course in the University.

It's nice to hear you are from Argentina. So am I 

@Lucas09 posted:

I was given some passages to analyse and I found this sentence in one of them.

I'll attach a picture of the passage to this answer, the sentence is highlighted in black in the second column.

Thank you so much for including the source. That always helps. The Buenos Aires Herald article you have been provided with dates from 1995 and, back in those years, that paper used to be very well written. Even though the author seems to be a native British speaker, I still find the term "mechanism" strange. Notice that at the end the term "processes," which is more suitable in my opinion, is used. I will transcribe the whole paragraph for the sake of clarity, and will highlight the different nouns employed:

Three mechanisms are given for the protective effect of marriage, the main one being that it acts as a buffer against stress and anxiety. Another theory is that healthy people are more likely to be the ones that get married, while another view is that marriage break-up leads people to risky behaviour, such as smoking, drinking and unsafe sex. "There is strong evidence that all three processes occur," McAllister says.

Figuratively speaking, "mechanism" can apply to "buffer," but not to the other two situations. I think the first sentence could be improved if written as follows:

- Three circumstances are associated with the protective effect of marriage, the main one being that it acts as a buffer against stress and anxiety.

Add Reply

×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×