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Yes, right in both cases.

"I'm in favor of what he does" includes the noun clause "what he does." The noun clause can't be directly preceded by "all" or by any other determiner. (It could, however, be preceded by "all of" or "some of" or "much of.")

"I'm in favor of all (or everything) that he does" is also acceptable. In this case, "that he does" is the relative clause modifying an indefinite pronoun – "all" or "everything." If you have the relative clause "that he does," you do need something for it to modify, so you can't omit "all" or "everything." It's possible, however, to omit "that." In standard English, "what" is not used as a pronoun introducing a relative clause.

Marilyn has brought this to my attention: that in some dialects of English, mostly in the UK, "what" is used as a relativizer: "I'm goin' home with the guy what brung me." This kind of construction is used frequently by Eliza Doolittle in "My Fair Lady" before her transformation into refinement by her intense mentor and coach, Dr. Henry Higgins.

Rachel
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