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Firstly, thank you for taking the time to read the question.

I have encountered a sentence beginning with 'although,' and a question arose.

Although postal banking is effective in other countries and many post offices are located in regions where banks are critically needed, some critics of the proposal contend that post offices are ill-equipped to act as banks.

Here, do I need to put a comma between "in other countries" and "and many post offices" in the dependent clause beginning with 'although'?

I mean, like this:

Although postal banking is effective in other countries, and many post offices are located in regions where banks are critically needed, some critics of the proposal contend that post offices are ill-equipped to act as banks.

I'd really appreciate it if you could teach me whether a comma is necessary or not in the sentence. Thank you.

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Hello, Deku, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange.

@Deku posted:


Although postal banking is effective in other countries and many post offices are located in regions where banks are critically needed, some critics of the proposal contend that post offices are ill-equipped to act as banks.

Here, do I need to put a comma between "in other countries" and "and many post offices" in the dependent clause beginning with 'although'?



The sentence is correct with or without a comma after "countries." The use of a comma is optional there.

Placing a comma there would have the virtue of ensuring that "many post offices" will not be understood as the second object (noun-phrase complement) of the preposition "in": "in other countries and many post offices."

On the other hand, it is not necessary. The pattern "Although [subordinate clause] and [subordinate clause], [main clause]" is perfectly correct.

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