Should the ownership go to Jane or her life? With the commas of interjection it becomes confusing how to write it correctly. The sentence is.

"Suddenly, a new element has been added to Jane, who is now a young adult's, life." 

or

"Suddenly, a new element has been added to Jane's, who is now a young adult, life."

or something entirely different. This has be so hung up on how one would write this. It's easily said out loud but writing it has me confused. Thanks!

Original Post

Hi, Aliciaballerina,

I think what you are trying to say is: "Suddenly, Jane, who is now a young adult, has a new element added to her life."

ahmed_btm posted:

Hi, Aliciaballerina,

I think what you are trying to say is: "Suddenly, Jane, who is now a young adult, has a new element added to her life."

THANK YOU

Yeah, I would agree with Ahmed's solution - the original sentence is difficult, and it's better to create a new one that works better.

If you want to understand the principle of how to use the apostrophe in the original, it needs to go with the main clause about Jane because that's what the new element is being added to, not the subordinate clause, which is interjecting a bit of extra information about her. To use this principle properly in the future (when it's already a smoother sentence), consider where the main and subordinate clauses are, and which one the belonging element goes with. In your example, the belonging element - "life" - belongs to Jane, so the apostrophe goes with her. The subordinate clause is describing her, so "life" can't belong to 'young adult' because that is used as a description of the sentence subject (Jane) and because "life" is part of the main clause. The subordinate one is already ended before "life" comes in, so it has to relate to the first part of the main clause, i.e. Jane.

That was a nice, lovely, long-winded explanation for you. Hope it made sense.

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