Good afternoon! 

Could you, please, explain to me the functions of the articles in the following example: 

"In this type of review, the names of the reviewers are hidden from the author. This is the traditional method of reviewing and is the most common type by far" (https://www.elsevier.com/revie.../what-is-peer-review)

Why does the author place the article (THE) if reviewers and authors are unknown for us from the context? It's like general information for publication of scientific works.  

Another one: 

"But bear in mind that despite the above, reviewers can often identify the author through their writing style, subject matter or self-citation – it is exceedingly difficult to guarantee total author anonymity". (https://www.elsevier.com/revie.../what-is-peer-review)

Why in this case reviewers are written with no article and the author with the definite? Both reviewers and the author are unknown to the author. 

Thank you!

Original Post

Hello, DoraD, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange.

DoraD posted:

Could you, please, explain to me the functions of the articles in the following example: 

"In this type of review, the names of the reviewers are hidden from the author. This is the traditional method of reviewing and is the most common type by far" (https://www.elsevier.com/revie.../what-is-peer-review)

Why does the author place the article (THE) if reviewers and authors are unknown for us from the context? It's like general information for publication of scientific works.

The reviewers and the author are the reviewers and the author of some specific work.

DoraD posted:

 

"But bear in mind that despite the above, reviewers can often identify the author through their writing style, subject matter or self-citation – it is exceedingly difficult to guarantee total author anonymity". (https://www.elsevier.com/revie.../what-is-peer-review)

Why in this case reviewers are written with no article and the author with the definite? Both reviewers and the author are unknown to the author.

"reviewers" is used generically. "the" accompanies "author" because there is only one author and it would be ungrammatical to say: Reviewers can often identify author.

Gustavo, thank you for your letter! 

But, as far as I know, the generic function is when we want to indicate that the noun is a composite image of the class (we place the article THE before the noun, not the zero article).  

"But bear in mind that despite the above, reviewers can often identify the author through their writing style, subject matter or self-citation – it is exceedingly difficult to guarantee total author anonymity". (https://www.elsevier.com/revie.../what-is-peer-review)

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