A: Hey, Mike. How about a drink?
B: Thanks, but not tonight.
A: Wouldn't you care for just a glass of wine?
B: I'd like, but I'm the designated driver tonight.

Is the last line correct?
How about this below?
I'd like 'to', but I'm 'a' designated driver tonight.

Thanks!
Original Post
You have to say, "I'd like TO."

Here's an explanation from a few days ago. If it is not clear, please tell me and I'll try to clarify further:

I'm going to write Swan's description of "to" used in place of the whole infinitive.

"to used instead of whole infinitive

We can use to instead of the whole infinitive of a repeated verb (and following words), if the meaning is clear.

Are you and Gillian getting married? = We hope to.
Let's go for a walk. - I don't want to.
I don't dance much now, but I used to a lot.
Sorry I shouted at you. I didn't mean to.
Somebody ought to clean up the bathroom. - I'll ask John to."

Note that in the responses, the verbs that take the to-infinitive are only the ones that take "to." And with these verbs, you must include the "to" in a short answer (unless you use a pronoun to refer to a thing: e.g., "Yes, I want it.") For example, we can't answer "I considered to" or "I enjoyed to" because "consider" and "enjoy" are not followed by infinitives, but by gerunds.

All the verbs in the examples that Swan gave are verbs which, when followed by a second verb, have that second verb in the infinitive form.

The long form of the verbs in the example would be

We hope to get married.
I don't want to go for a walk.
I used to dance a lot.
I didn't mean to shout at you.
I'll ask John to clean up the bathroom.
_______

"Struggle" is a verb that is often followed by the infinitive with "to." as in "struggle to do something." But, "struggle" can also be another kind of verb -- one that appears without "to."

"Struggle" can be followed by "with" or "against," too, as in "struggle with a weight problem" or "struggle against poverty."

"Struggle can also be used alone, as in a sentence like this:

A: How are John and Mary doing?
B: They're struggling. They're young and poor and living far from home. They'll be OK, though.
_______

So, in your sentence, Kis, you can say: "I'm struggling."

This means that you are having difficulties. The struggling relates to your entire life situation.

You can also say: "I'm struggling to."

This means that you are struggling to reach a decision because the question included "reach a decision." This part is understood. It does not relate to the rest of your life. "Struggling to refers to "struggling to reach a decision.

Rachel
quote:
A: Hey, Mike. How about a drink?
B: Thanks, but not tonight.
A: Wouldn't you care for just a glass of wine?
B: I'd like, but I'm the designated driver tonight.

Is the last line correct?
How about this below?
I'd like 'to', but I'm 'a' designated driver tonight.


a. Is this below the long form of the 'to'?

I'd like to care for a glass of wine.

b. Isn't it possible to use 'I'd like' to indicate 'I'd like a glass of wine', in which case 'to infintive' ins't needed?

c. Could you answer the question about the article?

Thanks!
You can say either:

I'd like a glass of wine.

OR

I'd care for a glass of wine.

You can't have both "like" and "care for" as the main verbs. They mean the same thing.

If the question is "Would you like a glass of wine?" the short answer would be, "Yes, I would."

If the question is "Would you care for a glass of wine, the answer would be, "Yes, I would."
______

If the question is, "Would you like to have a glass of wine?" the short answer is, "Yes, I would," or "Yes, I'd like TO."

If the question is, "Would you care to have a glass of wine?" the short answer is, "Yes, I would." We just don't usually say, "I'd care to."

Rachel
quote:
If the question is "Would you care for a glass of wine, the answer would be, "Yes, I would."
______

If the question is, "Would you like to have a glass of wine?" the short answer is, "Yes, I would," or "Yes, I'd like TO."

If the question is, "Would you care to have a glass of wine?" the short answer is, "Yes, I would." We just don't usually say, "I'd care to."


I'm still having trouble understanding what you say. This is the original unit:
A: Wouldn't you care for just a glass of wine?
B: __________, but I'm the designated driver tonight.

According to your explanation above, the right response is "Yes, I would" not "Yes, I'd like to". But you originally said it must be "I'd like to". Could you tell me what I misunderstand?

Thanks!
Right. The original question:

A: Wouldn't you care for just a glass of wine?
B: __________, but I'm the designated driver tonight

calls for the response, "Yes, I would."

I'm afraid I was lumping the other questions on this thread – using "like" and "care to" both as the main verb" – together in my response. I'm sorry if it was confusing.

Rachel

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×