Skip to main content

- Supermarket shelves stripped bare by stockpilers were familiar scenes as anxious shoppers loaded up withtoilet rolls and pasta when lockdowns were first imposed. (From The Economist).

It feels to me that "as"  Introduce a  relative clause  modifying "familiar scenes".  But I'm not sure because I only know about "the same as" pattern.

Is that really a modifier? Thanks.

Last edited by Robby zhu
Original Post

Hi, Robby Zhu,

@Robby zhu posted:

- Supermarket shelves stripped bare by stockpilers were familiar scenes as anxious shoppers loaded up with toilet rolls and pasta when lockdowns were first imposed. (From The Economist).

No, "as anxious shoppers loaded up with toilet rolls and pasta when lockdowns were first imposed" is an adverbial clause of time indicating when those scenes (of supermarket shelves being emptied by stockpilers) were familiar. The clause in turn contains another adverbial clause indicating when shoppers purchased those goods ("when lockdowns were first imposed").

Last edited by Gustavo, Contributor

Add Reply

×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×