Hello, Chuck, and welcome to the Grammar Exchange!

Yes, they are both grammatically correct -- unless one takes the prescriptive position that "unique" is a non-gradable adjective. I am not one to take that position. In practice, native speakers commonly say "very unique," etc.

I can't say that I have a preference between "a home as unique as you" and "a home as unique as you are." You can take your pick. The pronoun "you" doesn't show a distinction between subjective and objective case, so things are easy. ♣

 

Chuck T,

davidmoderator posted:
The pronoun "you" doesn't show a distinction between subjective and objective case, so things are easy. ♣

 

In addition to what David says, the fact that these are sentence fragments leaves much to the imagination.  "We want to sell A HOME AS UNIQUE AS YOU" can either mean "We want to sell a home as unique as one that you would sell" or "We want to sell a home that is as unique as you are".  Out of context, I could imagine the entire phrase to be "A HOME AS UNIQUE AS YOU could ever find in Fiji".

Since you represent this as "a custom home in this headline for an ad", I'm guessing that the latter interpretation is the one intended.  I'm also guessing that you make a living writing advertising copy and want free expert copy editing.  We're not in that business.  But if I'm wrong about this, please let me know.

DocV

docvguestcontributor posted:
In addition to what David says, the fact that these are sentence fragments leaves much to the imagination.  "We want to sell A HOME AS UNIQUE AS YOU" can either mean "We want to sell a home as unique as one that you would sell" or "We want to sell a home that is as unique as you are".  Out of context, I could imagine the entire phrase to be "A HOME AS UNIQUE AS YOU could ever find in Fiji".

Very interesting, DocV. I didn't mention what I was taking to be the implicit component of the sentence. It's not very creative, I admit, but I'd like to think that William of Ockham might have approved, or at least his razor. I think the missing words are "This is." If the phrase "a home as unique as you" appeared on a sign next to a home, or in a magazine or flyer next to a picture of the home, the phrase would presumably take the house it was next to as its referent.

That's how I reconstruct the "this." And "is," the simple copula, connects the referent with the noun phrase "a home as unique as you." Thus we have: "This is a home as unique as you (are)." Within that sentence, I read "as unique as you (are)" as a reduced relative clause, such that we may reconstruct the whole as: "This is a home that is as unique as you (are)." Assuming that reconstruction is valid, I don't think that "are" contributes anything of importance. ♣

davidmoderator posted:

This is a home that is as unique as you (are)." Assuming that reconstruction is valid, I don't think that "are" contributes anything of importance. ♣

I agree, David.  I do have to say, though, that the phrase needs to be reconstructed as a complete sentence as you've done here, with "This is", or it needs "are".  But without the reconstruction, it is simply an advertising slogan, as you appear to acknowledge in your post.  Is editing advertising copy what I'm getting paid for?  Because, in case you haven't noticed, I'm not getting paid at all.

Therefore, as much as I'd like to, I really don't think it would be appropriate for me to comment further on CHUCK T's thread.

DocV

Thanks, DocV.

As a point of reference, I happened upon this site through a Google search and did not realize it was not appropriate to ask for advice for professional work. Didn't see that anywhere in the guidelines. Sorry to have offended you.  It was never my intent to ask for free editing. I was just wondering if both were grammatically correct as stated in my original post. 

Thanks very much to all for weighing in. Your input was very helpful and very much appreciated. 

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