Hello, teachers!
Would you please help me with this?
Which is/are the correct and common choice/choices in the place of [____]?

[1] I'd like 4 cheeseburgers, 3 Cokes, and 1 milk shake. / That [____] 15 dollars and 45 cents.
1. is,
2. will be
3. would be
4. is going to be
5. [comes to, will come to, would come to, is coming to]
6. [runs to, will run to, would run to, is going to run to]

[2] I'd like two milk shakes and three Cokes. / [____] / Yes, that's all.
1. Is that all?
2. Will that be all?
3. Would that be all?
4. Is that going to be all?

Thank you very much.
Have a good day.
Original Post
I can only speak for establishments in the U.S. Such announcements vary with individuals and regions, but the most frequent forms are, in order of frequency:

(The price alone)
That's ...
That'll be...
That's gonna be...
That comes to ... (more formal)

The rest of the possibilities are not appropriate.

"Runs to" is not appropriate. The Random House Unabridged Dictionary* defines "run [to]" thus: To amount to; total: The bill ran to $100.

The expression is most often used to describe a past or present cost or an estimate of future costs in approximate, not absolute, terms. It implies "up to (this amount)." "Run to" is never used in announcing the total of a charge to a customer.

Google examples include:

Warner-Lambert, Rezulin's manufacturer, estimated that the one-time costs of the recall ran to $100 million, but the damage inflicted has been much greater.

For years they were bombed indiscriminately and their losses during the war ran to over a million.

[2] I'd like two milk shakes and three Cokes. / [____] / Yes, that's all.
1. Is that all?
2. Will that be all?
3. Would that be all?
4. Is that going to be all?

The usual question in a fast-food restaurant in the U.S. is "[Is] that it?" Other possibilities are

Is that all?
Is that gonna be all?

In a shop where you would make a purchase at a counter, the associate might say "Will that be all?" but that is rather formal style. "Would be" is not used in any case.

Again, much depends on the speaker, and also probably on the region of the country.

Marilyn Martin

*1977

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