Skip to main content

Hi,

I wish to ask whether the phrase “shoot to fame” can be in the passive voice. For example, is this sentence from a newspaper “Nation Thailand” using the phrase correctly?

“Phoudoi Xayachak was shot to fame after his photo was posted on social media. He is now thought to be the tallest man in Laos.”

Here, I rule out the possible scenario where someone could be made famous by being violently shot with a gunman. In other words, can “be shot to fame” be interchangeable with “shoot to fame”? The passive voice doesn’t make sense to me, but seems to be widely used by some Asian journalist writers as I observe on the Internet.

Thanks.

Original Post

Replies sorted oldest to newest

Hi, Kinto,

@Kinto posted:

Hi,

I wish to ask whether the phrase “shoot to fame” can be in the passive voice. For example, is this sentence from a newspaper “Nation Thailand” using the phrase correctly?

“Phoudoi Xayachak was shot to fame after his photo was posted on social media. He is now thought to be the tallest man in Laos.”

Here, I rule out the possible scenario where someone could be made famous by being violently shot with a gunman. In other words, can “be shot to fame” be interchangeable with “shoot to fame”? The passive voice doesn’t make sense to me, but seems to be widely used by some Asian journalist writers as I observe on the Internet.

Thanks.

I see that 'shoot to fame' is used exactly like 'rise to fame'. Both of them can't be passivized. On COCA, all the examples with 'shoot to fame' are in the active voice.

Last edited by ahmed_btm
@Kinto posted:

I see that ‘rise to fame’ is a perfect way to understand ‘shoot to fame’, only that I’ve never seen anyone write ‘be risen to fame’ while ‘be shot to fame’ is so popular in my searches that it’s giving me doubts. But yes, I now believe it’s a common error.

Hi, Kinto,

I agree with Ahmed that "shoot" in "shoot to fame" is intransitive, as is "rise."

You have never seen anyone write "be risen to fame" not only because the idiom is "rise to fame" but also because "rise" is always intransitive. The transitive form is "raise," so you can only find "be raised," and never "be risen."

Last edited by Gustavo, Co-Moderator

Add Reply

×
×
×
×
Link copied to your clipboard.
×