Hello,
Which of the following are correct? And some explanation would be appreciated.

I had to bring my daughter to school.
I had to take my daughter to school.

Thanks for the help.

Original Post
Both of your sentences are correct, but each one is correct in a different context.

"Bring" refers to movement toward the speaker or writer; "take" means movement away from the speaker or writer.

You would bring your daughter to school if your were speaking from the school and you had your daughter with you. If, for example, you were a teacher in the school and you couldn't leave your young daughter at home, you might say to another teacher: "I had to bring my daughter to school today."

You would take your daughter to school if you had left your daughter at school and were now speaking from another place. For example, you might say to your boss: "I'm sorry I'm late this morning. I had to take my daughter to school."

An example that the New York Times Manual of Style and Usage* has on page 49:

"...So the Canadian prime minister cannot be bringing a group of industrialists to a conference in Detroit, except in an article written from Detroit."
_______

Michael Swan** states:

"In British English, we use bring for movements to the place where the speaker or hearer is, but we use take for movements to other places...

This is a nice restaurant. Thanks for bringing me here."
(spoken from inside the restaurant.)

A speaker might say after leaving the restaurant:
That was a nice restaurant. Thanks for taking me there.

Swan also states:

"We can also use bring for a movement to a place where the speaker or hearer was or will be...:

I'll be arriving at the hotel about six o'clock. Can you bring the car round at six-thirty?
Can you take the car to the garage tomorrow? I won't have time.
"

A footnote states that these rules are not always followed in American English.
_______

Yet, in the American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language***, a usage note at "bring" states:

"In most dialects of American English, bring is used to denote motion toward the place of speaking or the place from which the action is regarded:

Bring it over here.
The prime minister brought a large retinue to Washington with her.
[The reporter is in Washington or maybe the U.S., but certainly not in the prime minister's country.]

Take is used to denote motion away from a place:

Take it over there.
The president will take several advisors with him when he goes to Moscow.
" [The reporter is not in Moscow.]

Interestingly, the American Heritage goes on to say: "...when the relevant point of focus is not the place of speaking itself, the difference obviously depends on the context. We can say either "The labor leaders brought (or took) their requests to the mayor's office," depending on whether we want to describe things from the point of view of the labor leaders or the mayor. Perhaps for this reason, the distinction between bring and take has been blurred in some areas..."

Rachel
_______
*The New York Times Manual of Style and Usage by Allan M. Siegal and William G. Connolly. Random House. 1999
**Practical English Usage by Michael Swan Oxford University Press. 2e. 1995
***The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language. Houghton Mifflin Company. 1996

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